Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes

Use Node.js 12 on Red Hat OpenShift today

Use Node.js 12 on Red Hat OpenShift today

On April 23, Node.js released its latest major version with Node.js 12. Because this is an even-numbered release, it will become a Long Term Support (LTS) release in October, code-named Erbium.

This release brings a host of improvements and features, which this blog post isn’t going to cover. Instead, I will focus on how to start using this new release today on Red Hat OpenShift. If you’re interested in more about the various improvements and new features, check out the articles listed at the end of this post.

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Red Hat OpenShift 3.11 disconnected installation using Satellite Docker registry

Red Hat OpenShift 3.11 disconnected installation using Satellite Docker registry

In this article, I will discuss the prerequisites and requirements for the successful implementation of Red Hat OpenShift 3.11 disconnected installation using Red Hat Satellite as the local Docker registry, which I have been able to do with the support of my colleagues. I also discuss adjustments that may be required post install.

This work is based on the following references:

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Getting started with CodeReady Workspaces and Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes launcher

Getting started with CodeReady Workspaces and Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes launcher

Watch this video for an introduction to CodeReady Workspaces and Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes, their functionality, and how they complement each other for cloud-native application development on OpenShift. This is the first part of a video series, and the subsequent videos will cover step-by-step instructions to use Launcher and CodeReady workspaces. To try hands-on labs, refer to the tutorial on GitHub.

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Node.js for Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes wins a Devie award

Node.js for Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes wins a Devie award

For the past year and a half or so, Red Hat Middleware has provided a supported Node.js runtime on OpenShift as part of Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes (RHOAR). Our goal has been to provide rapid releases within a week or two of the upstream Node.js core project, booster applications to get developers up and running quickly, and, of course, provide world-class service and support for customers.

This past week at the DeveloperWeek 2019 conference in San Francisco, that focus and dedication paid off as Red Hat was awarded a “Devie” award in the category of “Code Frameworks and Libraries.” I couldn’t have been more thrilled to accept the award on behalf of our team.

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Extending support to Spring Boot 2.x for Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes

Extending support to Spring Boot 2.x for Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes

What Red Hat is providing

Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes (RHOAR) is a recommended set of products, tools, and components for developing and maintaining cloud-native applications on the Red Hat OpenShift platform. As part of this offering, Red Hat is extending its support to Spring Boot 2 and related frameworks for building modern, production-grade, Java-based cloud-native applications.

Spring Boot lets you create opinionated Spring-based standalone applications. The Spring Boot runtime also integrates with the OpenShift platform, allowing your services to externalize their configuration, implement health checks, provide resiliency and failover, and much more. To learn more about how Spring Boot applications integrate with the wider Red Hat portfolio, check out the following OpenShift Commons Briefing by Thomas Qvarnstrom:

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Jumpstart your microservices development with MicroProfile Starter (Beta)

Jumpstart your microservices development with MicroProfile Starter (Beta)

In this article, I’ll give you a quick tour of how to use the new MicroProfile Starter (Beta) site to generate, download, and build a Maven-based MicroProfile project with just a few clicks. Using this online project generator, you choose the MicroProfile version and server (such as Thorntail) that you want your project to be based on. Then you’ll be able to choose what example code to include in your project to see how to use the APIs that are part of the MicroProfile specifications such as Config, Health Check, Metrics, CDI, and more.

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Full API lifecycle management: A primer

Full API lifecycle management: A primer

APIs are the cornerstone of so many recent breakthroughs: from mobile applications, to the Internet of Things, to cloud computing. All those technologies expose, consume, and are built on APIs. And those APIs are a key driver for generating new revenue. Salesforce generates 50% of its revenue through APIs, Expedia generates 90% of its, and eBay generates 60% of its. With APIs becoming so central, it becomes essential to deal with full API lifecycle management. The success of your digital transformation project depends on it!

This article describes a set of full API lifecycle management activities that can guide you from an idea to the realization, from the inception of an API program up to management at scale throughout your whole company.

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Modern web applications on OpenShift: Part 3 — Openshift as a development environment

Modern web applications on OpenShift: Part 3 — Openshift as a development environment

Welcome back to the final part of this multipart series about deploying modern web applications on Red Hat OpenShift. In the first post, we took a look at how to deploy a modern web application using the fewest commands.

In the second part, we took a deeper look into how the new source-to-image (S2I) web app builder works and how to use it as part of a chained build.

This third and final part will take a look at how you can run your app’s “development workflow” on OpenShift.

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Monitoring Node.js Applications on OpenShift with Prometheus

Monitoring Node.js Applications on OpenShift with Prometheus

Observability is Key

One of the great things about Node.js is how well it performs in a container. Its fast start up time, and relatively small size make it a favorite for microservice applications on OpenShift. But with this shift to containerized deployments comes some complexity. As a result, monitoring Node.js applications can be difficult. At times it seems as though the performance and behavior of our applications become opaque to us. So what can we do to find and address issues in our services before they become a problem? We need to enhance observability by monitoring the state of our services.

Instrumentation

Instrumentation of our applications is one way to increase observability. Therefore, in this article, I will demonstrate the instrumentation of a Node.js application using Prometheus.

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