OpenShift

Self-service messaging with Red Hat AMQ Online and GitOps

Self-service messaging with Red Hat AMQ Online and GitOps

This article explores the service model of Red Hat AMQ Online 1.1 and how it maps to a GitOps workflow for different teams in your organization. For more information on new features in AMQ Online 1.1, see the release notes.

AMQ Online is an operator of stateful messaging services running on Red Hat OpenShift. AMQ Online is built around the principle that the responsibility of operating the messaging service is separate from the tenants consuming it. The operations team in can manage the messaging infrastructure, while the development teams provision messaging in a self-service manner, just as if they were using a public cloud service.

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Use the Kubernetes Python client from your running Red Hat OpenShift pods

Use the Kubernetes Python client from your running Red Hat OpenShift pods

Red Hat OpenShift is part of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) Certified Program, ensuring portability and interoperability for your container workloads. This also allows you to use Kubernetes tools to interact with an OpenShift cluster, like kubectl, and you can rest assured that all the APIs you know and love are right there at your fingertips.

The Kubernetes Python client is another great tool for interacting with an OpenShift cluster, allowing you to perform actions on Kubernetes resources with Python code. It also has applications within a cluster. We can configure a Python application running on OpenShift to consume the OpenShift API, and list and create resources. We could then create containerized batch jobs from the running application, or a custom service monitor, for example. It sounds a bit like “OpenShift inception,” using the OpenShift API from services created using the OpenShift API.

In this article, we’ll create a Flask application running on OpenShift. This application will use the Kubernetes Python client to interact with the OpenShift API, list other pods in the project, and display them back to the user.

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Announcing odo: Developer-focused CLI for Red Hat OpenShift

Announcing odo: Developer-focused CLI for Red Hat OpenShift

Following the first announcement of odo earlier in the year, we are pleased to announce the beta release of odo, an official project hosted on the OpenShift GitHub repository. After months of hard work, the beta release indicates that the API is stable and that functionality going forward will not change.

OpenShift Do (odo, for short) is a fast and straightforward CLI for developers who write, build, and iterate constantly on their source code. Instead of using more-refined tools such as oc, odo focuses on the iterative inner-loop cycle of coding (iterating on code changes prior to committing to Git) rather than the management of each application deployed to OpenShift. This article provides an overview of odo’s functionality.

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Easing application development on Red Hat OpenShift with odo

Easing application development on Red Hat OpenShift with odo

Have you ever developed applications on a platform like Red Hat OpenShift?

I’m a Java developer with more than 15 years of coding experience, and although I’ve been working with OpenShift for more than three years now, I haven’t found it especially easy to use as a day-to-day development platform. Why? There are many reasons, but the key ones involve complexity and speed. In this article, I’ll explain further and provide an introduction to the odo command-line tool.

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Get started with Jenkins CI/CD in Red Hat OpenShift 4

Get started with Jenkins CI/CD in Red Hat OpenShift 4

Automation is what we (developers) do. We automate ticket sales and automobiles and streaming music services and everything you can possibly tie into an analog-to-digital converter. But, have we taken the time to automate our processes?

In this article, I’ll show how to build an automated integration and continuous delivery pipeline using Jenkins CI/CD and Red Hat OpenShift 4. I will not dive into a lot of details—and there are a lot of details—but we’ll get a good overview. The details will be explained later in this series of blog posts.

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Automated migration from JBoss AMQ 6 to Red Hat AMQ 7 on Red Hat OpenShift

Automated migration from JBoss AMQ 6 to Red Hat AMQ 7 on Red Hat OpenShift

Since Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform was first released, Red Hat Middleware products were provided to deploy on it and help developers to build more complex solutions. Messaging Brokers are a very important piece in most new application architectures, such as microservices, event sourcing, and CQRS. Red Hat JBoss AMQ was provided from the beginning to deploy Messaging Brokers on Red Hat OpenShift easily.

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Build and deploy an API with Camel K on Red Hat OpenShift

Build and deploy an API with Camel K on Red Hat OpenShift

With the growing number of APIs and microservices, the time given to creating and integrating them has become shorter and shorter. That’s why we need an integration framework with tooling to quickly build an API and include capabilities for a full API life cycle. Camel K lets you build and deploy your API on Kubernetes or Red Hat OpenShift in less than a second. Unbelievable, isn’t it?

For those who are not familiar with it, Camel K is a subproject of Apache Camel with the target of building a lightweight runtime for running integration code directly on cloud platforms like Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift. It was inspired by serverless principles, and it will also target Knative shortly. The article by Nicola Ferraro will give you a good introduction.

In this article, I’ll show how to build an API with Camel K. For that, we will start first by designing our API using Apicurio Studio, which is based on the OpenAPI standard, and then we will provide the OpenAPI standard document to Camel K in order to implement the API and deploy it to Red Hat OpenShift.

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Red Hat OpenShift 4.0 Developer Preview on AWS: Up and running with Windows

Red Hat OpenShift 4.0 Developer Preview on AWS: Up and running with Windows

In a previous article, “OpenShift 4.0 Developer Preview on AWS is up and running” I included instructions for using macOS or Linux to install and manage your Red Hat OpenShift 4.0 cluster. Since I recently added a Windows 10 PC to my technology mix, I decided to try to use Windows as my only choice.

I was saddened to learn that the installer, openshift-install, isn’t available for Windows. But, like any developer who won’t be denied; I found a way.

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