Guide to starting use AWX on top of OpenShift, the upstream of Red Hat Ansible Tower

Introduction

This is the first post in a series that shows how to use the new release of the community version of Red Hat Ansible Tower. In this post, we will start with the installation of AWX on top of OpenShift. In the next post, I’ll show how to set a dynamic inventory to access the servers from AWS (EC2) and how to run a playbook to access our AWS EC2 inventory.

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Using Falcon to cleanup Satellite host records that belong to terminated OSP instances

Overview

In an environment where OpenStack instances are automatically subscribed to Satellite, it is important that Satellite is notified of terminated instances so that is can safely delete its host record. Not doing so will:

  • Exhaust the available subscriptions, leading to unsubscribed hosts not being able to apply updates and security errata.
  • In the event that an emergency security errata needs to be deployed across the organization, Satellite administrators would be unable to determine if a host was either off or terminated, leading to uncertainty with their security posture.

In smaller environments, where one team is responsible for both OSP and Satellite, it’s possible to have one system administrator do this by using their administrator level access across both systems to determine which host records can be safely deleted in Satellite when the corresponding instance no longer exists.

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Entropy in RHEL based cloud instances

According to Wikipedia, entropy is the randomness collected by an operating system or application for use in cryptography or other uses that require random data.

Entropy is often overlooked, misconfigured or forgotten and it can originate in sporadic errors whether it can be timeouts, refused connections, etc. Such errors are difficult to debug as the errors happen only when there is not enough entropy available.

This article tries to explain briefly how to check if this can be a problem in a RHEL system and how to fix it.

NOTE: This article is meant to provide some helpful hints about entropy. It is not meant to be exhaustive or definitive. There are hundreds of information sources on the Internet such as KCS articles; https://access.redhat.com/articles/221583 and https://access.redhat.com/solutions/19866 where this article is based. Check the bibliography section for more information.

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Using New Relic in Red Hat Mobile Node.js Applications

Introduction

New Relic is an application-monitoring platform that provides in-depth analytics and analysis for applications regardless of the type of environment where they are deployed, or as New Relic put it themselves:

“Gain end-to-end visibility across your customer experience, application performance, and dynamic infrastructure with the New Relic Digital Intelligence Platform.” – New Relic

You might ask why there’s a use for New Relic’s monitoring capabilities when Red Hat Mobile Application Platform (RHMAP) and OpenShift Container Platform both offer insights into the CPU, Disk, Memory, and general resource utilization of your server-side applications. While these generic resource reports are valuable, they might not offer the detail required to debug a specific issue. Since New Relic is built as an analytics platform from the ground up it is capable of providing unique insights into the specific runtime of your applications. For example, the JavaScript code deployed in Node.js applications is run using the V8 JavaScript engine which has a life-cycle that can have a significant impact on the performance of your application depending on how you’ve written it. Utilizing New Relic’s Node.js module provides a real-time view of V8 engine performance and how they might be affecting the performance of your production application. By using this data, you can refine your application code to reduce memory usage, which in turn can free CPU resources due to less frequent garbage collections. Neat!

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OpenShift 3.6 – Release Candidate (A Hands-On)

Hi, Everybody!

Today I want to introduce you to some features of OpenShift 3.6 while giving you the chance to have a hands-on experience with the Release Candidate.

First of all:

  1. It’s a Release Candidate and the features I’ll show you are marked as Tech Preview, so use them for testing purpose ONLY!
  2. We cannot use Minishift just because there is no Minishift updated yet. Anyway, I’ll show how could use its base iso-image.
  3. I don’t want to use ‘oc cluster up’ in a virtual machine just because setting up a virtual machine, to run it, would be a waste of time.

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