Cloud

Using Ansible Galaxy Roles in Ansible Playbook Bundles

[In case you aren’t following the OpenShift blog, I’m cross posting my article here because I think it will be of interest to the Red Hat Developer commnity.]

The Open Service Broker API standard aims to standardize how services (cloud, third-party, on-premise, legacy, etc) are delivered to applications running on cloud platforms like OpenShift. This allows applications to consume services the exact same way no matter on which cloud platform they are deployed. The service broker pluggable architecture enables admins to add third-party brokers to the platform in order to make third-party and cloud services available to the application developers directly from the OpenShift service catalog. As an example AWS Service Broker created jointly by Amazon and Red Hat, Azure Service Broker created by Microsoft and Helm Service Broker created by Google to allow consumption of AWS services, Azure services and Helm charts on Kubernetes and OpenShift. Furthermore, admins can create their own brokers in order to make custom services like provisioning an Oracle database on their internal Oracle RAC available to the developers through the service catalog.

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Container Testing in OpenShift with Meta Test Family

Without proper testing, we should not ship any container. We should guarantee that a given service in a container works properly. Meta Test Family (MTF) was designed for this very purpose.

Containers can be tested as “standalone” containers and as “orchestrated” containers. Let’s look at how to test containers with the Red Hat OpenShift environment. This article describes how to do that and what actions are needed.

MTF is a minimalistic library built on the existing Avocado and behave testing frameworks, assisting developers in quickly enabling test automation and requirements. MTF adds basic support and abstraction for testing various module artifact types: RPM-based, Docker images, and more. For detailed information about the framework and how to use it check out the MTF documentation.

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Apache Camel URI completion: easy installation for Eclipse, VS Code, and OpenShift.io

Discoverability and ease of installation of Apache Camel tooling based on the Language Server Protocol has been improved. Manual download and installation of binaries is no longer necessary!  For the Eclipse desktop IDE and the VS Code environment you can now find and install the Camel tooling directly from the marketplaces for each development environment.

Camel Language Server is now also available in Red Hat OpenShift.io!

In this article, I will show you how you can install Camel tooling via the marketplaces for Eclipse and VS Code.  I will also show how to enable Camel tooling in your OpenShift.io workspace.

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Signage for the Red Hat Summit at Moscone West in San Francisco

Red Hat Summit: Functions as a Service with OpenWhisk and OpenShift

Serverless computing (often called Functions-as-a-Service, or FaaS) is one of the hottest emerging technologies today. The OpenWhisk project, currently in incubation at Apache, is an open-source implementation of FaaS that lets you create functions that are invoked in response to events. Our own Brendan McAdams gave a presentation and demo that explained the basics of serverless, how the OpenWhisk project works, and how to run OpenWhisk in OpenShift.

Brendan outlined the three properties of a serverless / FaaS platform:

  1. It responds to events by invoking functions
  2. Functions are loaded and executed on demand
  3. Functions can be chained together with triggered events from outside the FaaS platform itself.

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How to Debug Your Node.js Application on OpenShift with Chrome DevTools

Recently, I wrote a post called Zero to Express on OpenShift in Three Commands, which shows how to get started using Node.js, Express, and OpenShift together as fast as possible using the Node.js s2i (source-to-image) images that were recently released as part of Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes (RHOAR).

This post will add to the last one and show how we can start to debug and inspect our running code using the Chrome Developer Tools (DevTools) inspector.

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A Red Hat Summit sign on the streets of San Francisco

Red Hat Summit: An introduction to OpenShift.io

Red Hat OpenShift.io is an innovative online service for development teams. Installing and configuring IDEs, libraries, and various tools is a major time sink. OpenShift.io is a cloud-native set of zero-install tools for editing and debugging code, agile planning, and managing CI/CD pipelines. It also features package analytics (an unbelievably cool feature we’ll discuss more in a minute), and has various quick starts for common frameworks. Because everyone on the team uses the exact same tools, “It works on my machine” becomes a thing of the past.

Product Manager Todd Mancini started the session with a brief overview of the product. There’s so much more here than just the ability to develop code online. Today’s best practices include complex deployment pipelines. With OpenShift.io, you get a Maven repository and a Jenkins pipeline automatically. You can select from several pipeline templates. If you need an approval stage, for example, that’s built in to the product. In short, all the tools you need to create a virtuous circle of analyze, plan, and create are here, with no installation or configuration needed.

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Street Signs for the Red Hat Summit

Red Hat Summit: Clouds today, serverless tomorrow

Have you ever thought to yourself, “Today’s world would be so much richer if we had 29 kinds of hummus?” Neither has Stephanos Bacon, Senior Director of Portfolio Strategy for Red Hat Application Platforms. His entertaining presentation moved from the options available to humans hungry for hummus to a discussion of the bewildering array of choices available to developers and architects. Although too many choices can be a bad thing1, it’s important to understand what choices are relevant today and that the relevance of those choices is always shifting.

There are several things that don’t change, however. Some of the concerns that have been with us since before the dawn of time2 include:

  • Making developers as productive as possible
  • Balancing productivity with governance and compliance
  • Delivering software predictably and in a timely manner
  • Making software as robust as possible
  • Prioritizing usability and accessibility

But beyond these goals, there are three factors that are always in flux:

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From Localhost to the Cloud: Helping Organizations Develop Applications in a Hybrid World

For many developers, desktop tools are where they spend most of their time and feel most comfortable. We also recognize that developers are looking for new ways to build applications and new tools that are designed for these technologies. Developers are now using the cloud to host and manage their developer environment, and we see the tools that developers use moving to the cloud as well.

In the past year, we have taken steps to broaden our portfolio of developer tools. We acquired Codenvy to provide unique container-native offerings for our users, and we have been building Red Hat OpenShift.io, our SaaS offering for cloud-native development.

Today, we are announcing two more leaps toward a container- and cloud-native future:

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Red Hat Summit: Developing .NET Core Apps on Red Hat OpenShift

At Red Hat Summit 2018, Red Hat’s John Osborne and Microsoft’s Harold Wong gave a talk: Developing .NET Core Applications on Red Hat OpenShift.

.NET Core 1.0 availability for Linux was announced two years ago, but many developers still have a number of questions about the differences between .NET Framework and .NET Core. The session started with an overview of the differences. In a nutshell, .NET Framework is the set of APIs and libraries that Windows developers have used to years, which is pretty heavily tied to Microsoft Windows and Windows GUI APIs. On the other hand, .NET Core is the cross-platform set of APIs that are available for building applications that can run on Linux, macOS, or mobile devices via Xamarin.  .Net Core 2.0 was released last August; see Don Schenck’s article.

One of the key questions is when to use one versus the other.  Here’s the summary Harold Wong presented:

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Getting Started with Istio and Jaeger on Your Laptop

[Cross posted from the OpenShift blog]

About a year ago Red Hat announced its participation as a launch partner of the Istio project, a service mesh technology that creates an application focused network that transparently protects the applications from abnormalities in environments. The main goals of Istio are enhancing overall application security and availability through many different capabilities such as intelligent routing, circuit breaking, mutual TLS, rating, and limiting among others. Ultimately Istio is about helping organizations develop and deploy resilient, secure applications and services using advanced design and deployment patterns that are baked into the platform.

As part of our investments in making the technology easily consumable to Kubernetes and OpenShift users, Red Hat has created a ton of content:

  • learn.openshift.com: A web-based OpenShift and Kubernetes learning environment where users get to interact through the web browser with a real running instance of OpenShift and Istio service mesh with zero install time and no sign-up required.
  • Istio tutorial: Want to try the web-based scenario yourself from scratch? This Git repo contains instructions on how to set up an environment for yourself.
  • Introducing Istio Service Mesh for Microservices book by Christian Posta and Burr Sutter
  • Blog posts on the OpenShift and Red Hat Developer blogs

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