CloudForms: Manage your IT and Hybrid Cloud through a single platform

Before I start talking about IT and how you can manage, control, and optimize your Hybrid IT infrastructure, I propose that we reflect directly on your living room, where you usually watch TV,  movies, listen to music, play video games, etc. Even if you do not enjoy this type of entertainment, you know that for each of these devices, it is common to use a remote control allowing you to switch between them, manage them, and control all of your favorite programming. While these devices are converging to an all-in-one architecture, they are truly multi-functional. We’ve learned how to handle remote controls at a very young age and it’s the reality we live in. In this case, you are faced with heterogeneous devices and various remote controls, where the number of controls increases as you acquire new devices. It is difficult to have to manage the complexity of a simple task that is to manage your schedule, operating multiple devices, through different controls, with numerous features, and different vendors. Products and vendors bring specific features, use different nomenclature, and provide some features which may or may not be compatible with each other. Going beyond, some of these features made available by vendors, will not even be used throughout the lifetime of these devices, a real waste!

Picture 1 – Managing many devices with many remote controls

Considering this scenario, you might be wondering: What is the relationship of the complexity of having to deal with various entertainment devices and remote controls with your IT infrastructure? And what does this have to do with cloud computing or Hybrid IT?

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Build your Software Defined Data Center with Red Hat CloudForms and Openstack – part 2

Welcome back, here we will continue with the second part of my post, where we will work with Red Hat Cloudforms. If you remember, in our first post we spoke about Red Hat OpenStack Platform 11 (RHOSP). In addition to the blog article, at the end of this article is also a demo video I created to show to our customers/partners how they can build a fully automated software data center.

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Build your Software Defined Data Center with Red Hat CloudForms and Openstack – part 1

In this blog, I would like to show you how you can create your fully software-defined data center with two amazing Red Hat products: Red Hat OpenStack Platform and Red Hat CloudForms. Because of the length of this article, I have broken this down into two parts.

As you probably know, every organization needs to evolve itself becoming a Tech Company, leveraging its own Digital Transformation, embracing or enhancing existing processes, evolving people’s mindset, people’s soft/hard skills and of course using new technologies.

Remember we are living in a digital era where if you don’t change yourself and your organization someone will disrupt your business!

So, how can I become disruptive in my business?

Well, speaking from a purely technical perspective a good approach should consider cloud technologies.

These kinds of technologies can be the first brick of your digital transformation strategy because they can grant business and technologies values.

Continue reading “Build your Software Defined Data Center with Red Hat CloudForms and Openstack – part 1”

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Guide to starting to use AWX, the upstream of Red Hat Ansible Tower, on top of OpenShift

Introduction

This is the first post in a series that shows how to use the new release of the community version of Red Hat Ansible Tower. In this post, we will start with the installation of AWX on top of OpenShift. In the next post, I’ll show how to set a dynamic inventory to access the servers from AWS (EC2) and how to run a playbook to access our AWS EC2 inventory.

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Using Falcon to cleanup Satellite host records that belong to terminated OSP instances

Overview

In an environment where OpenStack instances are automatically subscribed to Satellite, it is important that Satellite is notified of terminated instances so that is can safely delete its host record. Not doing so will:

  • Exhaust the available subscriptions, leading to unsubscribed hosts not being able to apply updates and security errata.
  • In the event that an emergency security errata needs to be deployed across the organization, Satellite administrators would be unable to determine if a host was either off or terminated, leading to uncertainty with their security posture.

In smaller environments, where one team is responsible for both OSP and Satellite, it’s possible to have one system administrator do this by using their administrator level access across both systems to determine which host records can be safely deleted in Satellite when the corresponding instance no longer exists.

Continue reading “Using Falcon to cleanup Satellite host records that belong to terminated OSP instances”

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