Unlock your Microsoft Excel data with Red Hat JBoss Data Virtualization

After Unlock your MariaDB/MySQL data, Unlock your PostgreSQL data, and Unlock your Hadoop data with Hortonworks episodes, let’s continue the journey with this new episode of the series: “Unlock your [….] data with Red Hat JBoss Data Virtualization.” Through this blog series, we will look at how to connect Red Hat JBoss Data Virtualization (JDV) to different and heterogeneous data sources.

JDV is a lean, virtual data integration solution that unlocks trapped data and delivers it as easily consumable, unified, and actionable information. It makes data spread across physically diverse systems — such as multiple databases, XML files, and Hadoop systems — appear as a set of tables in a local database. By providing the following functionality, JDV enables agile data use:

  1. Connect: Access data from multiple, heterogeneous data sources.
  2. Compose: Easily combine and transform data into reusable, business-friendly virtual data models and views.
  3. Consume: Makes unified data easily consumable through open standards interfaces.

It hides complexities, like the true locations of data or the mechanisms required to access or merge it. Data becomes easier for developers and users to work with.

This post will guide you step-by-step on how to connect JDV to a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet using Teiid Designer and the Microsoft Excel translator. A translator acts as the bridge between JBoss Data Virtualization and an external system. The Microsoft Excel translator provides a quick and easy way to read a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet and provides contents of the spreadsheet in the tabular form that can be integrated with other sources.

Continue reading “Unlock your Microsoft Excel data with Red Hat JBoss Data Virtualization”


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Unlock your PostgreSQL data with Red Hat JBoss Data Virtualization

And here we go for another episode of the series: “Unlock your [….] data with Red Hat JBoss Data Virtualization.” Through this blog series, we will look at how to connect Red Hat JBoss Data Virtualization (JDV) to different and heterogeneous data sources.

JDV is a lean, virtual data integration solution that unlocks trapped data and delivers it as easily consumable, unified, and actionable information. It makes data spread across physically diverse systems — such as multiple databases, XML files, and Hadoop systems — appear as a set of tables in a local database. By providing the following functionality, JDV enables agile data use:

  1. Connect: Access data from multiple, heterogeneous data sources.
  2. Compose: Easily combine and transform data into reusable, business-friendly virtual data models and views.
  3. Consume: Makes unified data easily consumable through open standards interfaces.

It hides complexities, like the true locations of data or the mechanisms required to access or merge it. Data becomes easier for developers and users to work with. This post will guide you step-by-step on how to connect JDV to a PostgreSQL database using Teiid Designer. We will connect to a PostgreSQL database using the PostgreSQL JDBC driver.

Continue reading “Unlock your PostgreSQL data with Red Hat JBoss Data Virtualization”


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Installing Red Hat Developer Studio 10.2.0.GA through RPM

With the release of Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio 10.2, it is now possible to install Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio as an RPM. It is available as a tech preview. The purpose of this article is to describe the steps you should follow in order to install Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio.

Red Hat Software Collections

JBoss Developer Studio RPM relies on Red Hat Software Collections. You don’t need to install Red Hat Software Collections but you need to enable the Red Hat Software Collections repositories before you start the installation of the Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio.

Enabling the Red Hat Software Collections base repository

The identifier for the repository is rhel-server-rhscl-7-rpms on Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server and rhel-workstation-rhscl-7-rpms on Red Hat Enterprise Linux Workstation.

The command to enable the repository on Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server is:

sudo subscription-manager repos --enable rhel-server-rhscl-7-rpms

The command to enable the repository on Red Hat Enterprise Linux Workstation is:

sudo subscription-manager repos --enable rhel-workstation-rhscl-7-rpms

For more information, please refer to the Red Hat Software Collections documentation.

JBoss Developer Studio repository

As this is a tech preview, you need to manually configure the JBoss Developer Studio repository.

Create a file /etc/yum.repos.d/rh-eclipse46-devstudio.repo with the following content:

[rh-eclipse46-devstudio-stable-10.x]
name=rh-eclipse46-devstudio-stable-10.x
baseurl=https://devstudio.redhat.com/static/10.0/stable/rpms/x86_64/
enabled=1
gpgcheck=1
upgrade_requirements_on_install=1
metadata_expire=24h

Red Hat developer signing key

As this is a tech preview, you need to accept the Red Hat developer signing key that has been used for producing the JBoss Developer Studio RPM.

Execute the following command:

sudo rpm --import "https://www.redhat.com/security/a5787476.txt"

Install Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio

You’re now ready to install Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio through RPM.

Enter the following command:

sudo yum install rh-eclipse46-devstudio

Answer ‘y’ when asked and after all required dependencies have been downloaded and installed, Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio is available on your system through the standard update channel !!!

You should see messages like the following:

rh eclipse46 devstudio.log

Launch Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio

From the system menu, mouse over the Programming menu, and the Red Hat Eclipse menu item will appear.

programming menu

Select this menu item and Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio user interface will appear then:

devstudio

Enjoy!

Jeff Maury 


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Red Hat Releases New Versions of DevStudio, CDK, and DevSuite

As the interest in container application development continues to grow, so does our expansion of development tools and features.

Today, Red Hat released new versions of the following:

Here’s a listing of the new features:

Continue reading “Red Hat Releases New Versions of DevStudio, CDK, and DevSuite”

Securing Fuse 6.3 Fabric Cluster Management Console with SSL/TLS

Introduction

Enabling SSL/TLS in a Fabric is slightly more complex than securing a jetty in a standalone Karaf container. In the following article, we are providing feedback on the overall process. For clarity and simplification, the article will be divided into two parts.

 

Part1: The Management Console

Part2: Securing Web Service:including gateway-http

 

For the purpose of this PoC, the following environment will be used.

Continue reading “Securing Fuse 6.3 Fabric Cluster Management Console with SSL/TLS”


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Unlock your MariaDB/MySQL data with Red Hat JBoss Data Virtualization

Welcome back to a new episode of the series: “Unlock your [….] data with Red Hat JBoss Data Virtualization.” Through this blog series, we will look at how to connect Red Hat JBoss Data Virtualization (JDV) to different and heterogenous data sources.

JDV is a lean, virtual data integration solution that unlocks trapped data and delivers it as easily consumable, unified, and actionable information. It makes data spread across physically diverse systems — such as multiple databases, XML files, and Hadoop systems — appear as a set of tables in a local database. By providing following functionality, JDV enables agile data use:

  1. Connect: Access data from multiple, heterogeneous data sources.
  2. Compose: Easily combine and transform data into reusable, business-friendly virtual data models and views.
  3. Consume: Make unified data easily consumable through open standards interfaces.

It hides complexities, like the true locations of data or the mechanisms required to access or merge it. Data becomes easier for developers and users to work with.

This post will guide you step-by-step how to connect JDV to a MariaDB/MySQL database using Teiid Designer. We will connect to a MariaDB 10.1 server using MySQL Connector/J 5.1, a JDBC driver for communicating with MariaDB/MySQL servers. Indeed, you can follow this same tutorial with a MySQL instance.

Continue reading “Unlock your MariaDB/MySQL data with Red Hat JBoss Data Virtualization”


Join Red Hat Developers, a developer program for you to learn, share, and code faster – and get access to Red Hat software for your development.  The developer program and software are both free!

 

Deliver support for new languages in Eclipse IDE faster with Generic Editor and Language Servers

If you’re a regular on this blog, you’re probably well aware of Red Hat’s efforts in improving the Eclipse IDE and of the rise of Language Servers Protocol to develop common developer tools. Red Hat fully jumped on this opportunity to better factorize and share language-specific logic which is very likely to benefit to multiple editors, IDEs and languages at once. It also better separates the concerns of what an editor or IDE is supposed to do (text edition, integration with SCM, debug and deployment workflows…) with the target language itself. With this approach, a single language server can enable language features to multiple development tools at once, and a single development tool can be made more generic to support new languages for free, just by binding to the language server through the protocol.

Continue reading “Deliver support for new languages in Eclipse IDE faster with Generic Editor and Language Servers”


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Microservices: Comparing DIY with Apache Camel

Microservices are currently enjoying immense popularity. It is rare to find a tech conference without at least a few mentions of them in corridor conversations or titles of talks, and for good reason: microservices can provide a path to better, more maintainable, higher quality software delivered faster. What’s not to love?

Of course there are the “negatives” and details in the implementation of microservices that can trip up even the most seasoned architect-developer, but at the same time we are collectively learning from mistakes and creating or reusing fantastic open source projects and products that can help smooth over those rough bits.

One such project is Apache Camel (and Fuse, its Red Hat-supported distribution.) Created way before the microservices revolution, Apache Camel was born to ease integration of disparate computing systems by implementing well-tested enterprise integration patterns (EIPs) and supplying a developer-friendly interface for writing code to do the integration.

Continue reading “Microservices: Comparing DIY with Apache Camel”


Join Red Hat Developers, a developer program for you to learn, share, and code faster – and get access to Red Hat software for your development.  The developer program and software are both free!

 


Download and learn more about Red Hat JBoss Fuse, an innovative modular, cloud-ready architecture, powerful management and automation, and world class developer productivity. It is Java™ EE 7 certified and features powerful, enterprise-grade features such as high availability clustering, distributed caching, messaging, transactions, and a full web services stack.


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Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio on MacOS X- an alternative setup

The  recommended steps for setting up the Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio (JBDS), on all supported platforms, are found here. The instructions are pretty straight-forward and it is enough to get started right away – as long as you have a suitable java SDK installed on your machine.

However, if I go along that path, I would later have to deal with the Java SDK updates to go along with the compatibility of the existing tools. Eventually, I may end up having to install multiple versions of the Java SDK.

This led me to look for other alternatives. I thought to myself, the Linux’y way to go would be to run the JBDS as a container and have it display on my Desktop. I figured that I already have the tools for such task: XQuartz as an X11 server, socat to relay the display ports, and my Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) virtual machine. Yey!

The following are the steps on how I got all these to work together.

Continue reading “Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio on MacOS X- an alternative setup”


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Looking inside open source innovation

James Kirkland is one of the architects involved in the new open source Kapua project on Eclipse.org. In this blog post he discusses how innovation happens when industry leaders collaborate to make their customers successful.

Over the years, I’ve seen the beginning of a lot of open source projects, but the thing that excites me about the new Kapua project is that until now Eclipse IoT has been a set of individual projects that didn’t interrelate or even interoperate. (Read the Eclipse Foundation’s press release.)Kapua is the first attempt to create an ecosystem of projects that come together to provide functionality that is exponentially greater because of that integration. It’s an example of the sum being greater than the individual parts. The contributors came into this collaboration with the clear intention of solving broader IoT challenges in a unified way rather than each re-inventing the wheel on their own.

The higher goal of this project was to come up with a working IoT platform that would be able to meet the challenges of enterprise IoT. Previously you could take some of the Eclipse IoT projects and put them together with a lot of effort and additional coding to build out an IoT platform. This first release of Kapua code delivers a minimalistic IoT cloud-based management platform for managing IoT devices. This first step was to ensure that you could set it the device management platform, get it working and test it out. The Kura project used the same approach, of quickly getting to the first code release and to something that could be installed on a Raspberry Pi so that developers could easily get to a proof of concept stage for their own IoT gateway projects.

The functional goal was to use Kapua as the integration point for all the services under the Eclipse IoT banner. And to do it in such a way that the solution was not monolithic–that services could be plugged in and out according the needs of a given use case or the technology preferences of the developer.

To jumpstart the project, the companies involved contributed code they had developed within their own walls and proven out with their customers IoT deployments. Whenever you take a project and set it free you always run the risk of someone running with it and pushing it into the direction they prefer. We all had to build trust by doing small things together at first, like integrating just two projects, Camel and Kura. We became comfortable with each other’s work styles and that we were all going to live up to our commitment to collaborating. Then everyone does contribute within their individual areas of expertise. Even if the contribution is not code, but QA or test cases or documentation, it’s still expertise that an individual company might not have access to. Once you do that you’re able to build something bigger than any one company could build on their own–or even two companies.

Visit the Kapua project page and start participating.


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