Unlock your Red Hat JBoss Data Grid data with Red Hat JBoss Data Virtualization

Welcome to another episode of the series: “Unlock your Red Hat JBoss Data Grid (JDG) data with Red Hat JBoss Data Virtualization (JDV).”

This post will guide you through an example of connecting to Red Hat JBoss Data Grid data source, using Teiid Designer. In this example, we will demonstrate connecting to a local JDG data source.  We’re using the JDG 6.6.1, but you can connect to any local or remote JDG source (version 6.6.1) if you wish, using the same steps.

Continue reading “Unlock your Red Hat JBoss Data Grid data with Red Hat JBoss Data Virtualization”


Join Red Hat Developers, a developer program for you to learn, share, and code faster – and get access to Red Hat software for your development.  The developer program and software are both free!

 

Running Spark Jobs On OpenShift

Introduction:

A feature of OpenShift is jobs and today I will be explaining how you can use jobs to run your spark machine, learning data science applications against Spark running on OpenShift.  You can run jobs as a batch or scheduled, which provides cron like functionality. If jobs fail, by default OpenShift will retry the job creation again. At the end of this article, I have a video demonstration of running spark jobs from OpenShift templates against Spark running on OpenShift v3.

Continue reading “Running Spark Jobs On OpenShift”


Join Red Hat Developers, a developer program for you to learn, share, and code faster – and get access to Red Hat software for your development.  The developer program and software are both free!

 


For more information about Red Hat OpenShift and other related topics, visit: OpenShift, OpenShift Online.

Announcing Red Hat JBoss Data Grid 7

We are very excited to announce General Availability (GA) of Red Hat JBoss Data Grid (JDG) 7!

JDG supercharges today’s modern applications and allows developers to meet tough requirements of high performance, availability, reliability, and elastic scale. JBoss Data Grid is compatible with the existing data tier as well as applications written in any language, using any framework and any platform via multiple APIs such as memcached, HotRod, and REST. Red Hat JBoss Data Grid empowers developers to obtain a streamlined approach to standing up new applications, avoiding the challenges normally associated with integrating applications and traditional databases.

JDG 7 introduces the following major new features:

Real-time Data Analytics

  • Distributed Streams
    JDG 7 introduces a distributed version of the Java 8 Stream API which enables you to perform rich analytics operations on data stored in JDG using the functional expressions available in the Stream API.
  • Apache Spark integration
    JDG 7 introduces a Resilient Distributed Dataset (RDD) and Discretized Stream (DStream) integration with Apache Spark version 1.6. This enables you to use JDG as a highly scalable, high-performance data source for Apache Spark, executing Spark and Spark Streaming operations on data stored in JDG.
  • Apache Hadoop Integration
    JDG 7 features a Hadoop InputFormat/OutputFormat integration, which enables use of JDG as a highly scalable, high performance data source for Hadoop. This enables use of tools from the Hadoop ecosystem which support InputFormat/OutputFormat for processing on data stored in JDG.
  • Remote Task Execution
    JDG 7 features the ability to execute tasks (business logic) on JDG Server from the Java Hot Rod client. The task can be expressed as a Java executable loaded on JDG Server or as stored JavaScript procedure which executes on the Java 8 (Nashorn) scripting engine on JDG Server.

Continue reading “Announcing Red Hat JBoss Data Grid 7”


Join Red Hat Developers, a developer program for you to learn, share, and code faster – and get access to Red Hat software for your development.  The developer program and software are both free!

 

DevNation Live Blog: Building Reactive Applications with Node.js and Red Hat JBoss Data Grid

At DevNation, Red Hat’s Galder Zamarreño gave a talk with a live demo, Building reactive applications with Node.js and Red Hat JBoss Data Grid. The demo consisted of building an event-based three tier web application using JBoss Data Grid (JDG) as the data layer, an event manager running on Node.js, and a web client. Recently, support for Node.js clients was added to JDG, opening up the performance of a horizontally scalable in-memory data grid, to reactive web and mobile applications.

JDG is capable of processing and storing real-time streams of data, while maintaining very fast response times. It does this by using the memory available from a dynamically scalable grid of machines. Galder described JDG as a four-in-one package capable of being:

  • a distributed cache.
  • a high performance NoSQL primary data store.
  • an event-driven data store, particularly for real time event processing.
  • a big data and Internet of Things (IoT) data store.

The three-tiered web app in the demo consisted of:

  • A web client written in Elm, which is a functional language that compiles to JavaScript.  It is statically typed, which the presenter feels leads to well architected code. Elm competes with platforms such as React and Angular. Any of those other platforms could be used, but Galder chose Elm for the live demo, particularly given the useful error messages the compiler generates as a virtue of using a statically typed language.
  • An event manager running on Node.js using Express.js.
  • JBoss Data Grid as the data store.  Three nodes were used, running on the same laptop. Each element was guaranteed to be stored in two nodes, providing redundancy for fail over.

Node.js based applications have become very popular. Many use JavaScript on all three tiers, including NoSQL data stores. However, most of those data stores can’t match the scalability and response times of JDG. Traditionally, developers have needed to use Java to take advantage of JBoss Data Grid. The new fully asynchronous Node.js interface to JBoss Data Grid should enable developers to build some truly interesting next-generation reactive applications.

You can download JBoss Data Grid from developers.redhat.com. If you’d like to get involved, join the open source community at infinispan.org.

 


Join Red Hat Developers, a developer program for you to learn, share, and code faster – and get access to Red Hat software for your development.  The developer program and software are both free!

 


More about DevNation:  DevNation 2014 was our inaugural open source, polyglot conference for application developers and maintainers. View some of the DevNation 2015 session recordings here.  DevNation 2016 will be in San Francisco, USA, the week of June 26.  Be sure to follow its status and register at www.devnation.org.

DevNation 2016: Galder Zamarreno on “Building reactive applications with Node.js and Red Hat JBoss Data Grid”

DevNation sneak peek is a behind-the-scenes preview of sessions and information that will take place at DevNation 2016. Sign up for DevNation at www.devnation.org. Learn more. Code more. Share more. Join the Nation.

Building reactive applications with Node.js and Red Hat JBoss Data Grid

JBoss Data Grid is a distributed in-memory key/value data store from Red Hat, which can be used for caching, temporary and permanent storage. Although Java developers were its primary audience initially, the team has been expanding its appeal to C++, C# and even Javascript developers.

The latest JBoss Data Grid release includes a fully asynchronous Node.js client for interacting with JBoss Data Grid servers and my talk at DevNation is focused on how Javascript developers can make the most of the client to cache or store their data.

The talk has been designed around a web application that promotes JBoss Data Grid talks in forthcoming conferences, user groups… etc. The application will contain a Node.js component whose job will be to interact with the backend JBoss Data Grid servers to store and retrieve data, as well as receiving events when new information has been added to the backend. Through the live coding of this application, the audience will get an understanding of how to interact with the newly released Node.js JBoss Data Grid client, and after the talk they’ll have access to the code to be able to try it themselves.

Tuesday
3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Room 133

galder

About the presenter:

This will be my first time speaking at DevNation and I’m really excited about it because it brings together speaks and attendees not only from the Java/JVM space, but from other important developer communities such as Javascript.

Although I started as a Java developer, over the past decade I’ve become more and more interested in other programming languages, in particular functional programming languages such as Scala and Javascript, which I’ve been able to apply directly at my job.

These days I’m hugely interested by the purely functional ones such as Haskell, Elm or Purescript because the lack of mutability makes their solutions both elegant and easier to reason about. I’m also keeping a close eye as well on the Erlang ecosystem, e.g. Elixir, because I feel that the predictable latency offered by the Erlang VM is something that it’s not so easy to achieve in Java Virtual Machine.

I think learning other programming languages is one of the best things a developer can do, because it opens your mind to different points of view, different ways to solve problems, and widens the solution space.

 


Join Red Hat Developers, a developer program for you to learn, share, and code faster – and get access to Red Hat software for your development.  The developer program and software are both free!

 


More about DevNation:  DevNation 2014 was our inaugural open source, polyglot conference for application developers and maintainers. View some of the DevNation 2015 session recordings here.  DevNation 2016 will be in San Francisco, USA, the week of June 26.  Be sure to follow its status and register at www.devnation.org.