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HTTP-based Kafka messaging with Red Hat AMQ Streams

HTTP-based Kafka messaging with Red Hat AMQ Streams

Apache Kafka is a rock-solid, super-fast, event streaming backbone that is not only for microservices. It’s an enabler for many use cases, including activity tracking, log aggregation, stream processing, change-data capture, Internet of Things (IoT) telemetry, and more.

Red Hat AMQ Streams makes it easy to run and manage Kafka natively on Red Hat OpenShift. AMQ Streams’ upstream project, Strimzi, does the same thing for Kubernetes.

Setting up a Kafka cluster on a developer’s laptop is fast and easy, but in some environments, the client setup is harder. Kafka uses a TCP/IP-based proprietary protocol and has clients available for many different programming languages. Only the JVM client is on Kafka’s main codebase, however.

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Choosing the right asynchronous-messaging infrastructure for the job

Choosing the right asynchronous-messaging infrastructure for the job

The term asynchronous means “not occurring at the same time.” In the context of distributed systems and messaging, this term implies that request processing will occur at an arbitrary point in time. Asynchronous interactions hold many advantages over synchronous ones, but they also introduce new challenges. In this article, we will focus on specific considerations for choosing the asynchronous-messaging infrastructure for your event-driven systems.

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Creating event sources in the OpenShift 4.5 web console

Creating event sources in the OpenShift 4.5 web console

Red Hat OpenShift 4.5 makes it easier than ever to deploy and run event-driven applications that react to real-time information via event notifications. Empowered by OpenShift Serverless, applications come to life through events, scaling up resources as needed (or up to a pre-configured limit), and then scaling back to zero after the resource burst is over.

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Deploy your Java web application into the cloud using Eclipse JKube

Deploy your Java web application into the cloud using Eclipse JKube

Before we had Spring Boot and similar frameworks, a web app container was the main requirement for deploying Java web applications. We now live in the age of microservices, and many Java applications are developed on top of Quarkus, Thorntail, or Spring Boot. But some use cases still require an old-school web application.

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New features in Red Hat CodeReady Studio 12.16.0.GA and JBoss Tools 4.16.0.Final for Eclipse 2020-06

New features in Red Hat CodeReady Studio 12.16.0.GA and JBoss Tools 4.16.0.Final for Eclipse 2020-06

JBoss Tools 4.16.0 and Red Hat CodeReady Studio 12.16 for Eclipse 4.16 (2020-06) are now available. For this release, we focused on improving Quarkus– and container-based development and fixing bugs. We also updated the Hibernate Tools runtime provider and Java Developer Tools (JDT) extensions, which are now compatible with Java 14. Additionally, we made many changes to platform views, dialogs, and toolbars in the user interface (UI).

This article is an overview of what’s new in JBoss Tools 4.16.0 and Red Hat CodeReady Studio 12.16 for Eclipse 4.16 (2020-06).

Installation

First, let’s look at how to install these updates. CodeReady Studio (previously Red Hat Developer Studio) comes with everything pre-bundled in its installer. Simply download the installer from the Red Hat CodeReady Studio product page and run it as follows:

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Performance and usability enhancements in Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2.2

Performance and usability enhancements in Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2.2

Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2.2 is now available. For the improvements in this release, we focused on performance and configuration, plus updating CodeReady Workspaces 2.2 to use newer versions of the most popular runtimes and stacks. We also added the ability to allocate only the CPU that you need for IDE plugins, and we introduced a new diagnostic feature that lets you start up a workspace in debug mode.

CodeReady Workspaces 2.2 is available on OpenShift 3.11 and OpenShift 4.3 and higher, including tech-preview support for OpenShift 4.5.

Note: Based on Eclipse Che, CodeReady Workspaces is a Red Hat OpenShift-native developer environment that supports cloud-native development.

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Improved XML grammar binding and more in Red Hat VS Code XML extension 0.13.0

Improved XML grammar binding and more in Red Hat VS Code XML extension 0.13.0

Following closely on the huge 0.12.0 update, the new Red Hat XML extension for Visual Studio Code (VS Code) 0.13.0 release makes XML editing in VS Code even better. For this release, we focused on making it easier to bind and generate a new XML Schema Definition (XSD) or Document Type Definition (DTD) grammar file from an existing XML file. Other highlights include document link support for xsi:schemaLocation, XML catalog snippets, support for XML catalog path validation, and support for DTD SystemId file path completion.

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Automate workshop setup with Ansible playbooks and CodeReady Workspaces

Automate workshop setup with Ansible playbooks and CodeReady Workspaces

At Red Hat, we do many in-person and virtual workshops for customers, partners, and other open source developers. In most cases, the workshops are of the “bring your own device” variety, so we face a range of hardware and software setups and corporate endpoint-protection schemes, as well as different levels of system knowledge.

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