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Checkpointing Java from outside of Java

Checkpointing Java from outside of Java

When OpenJDK‘s Java virtual machine (JVM) runs a Java application, it loads a dozen or so classes before it starts the main class. It runs a method several hundred times before it invokes the optimizing compiler on that method. This preparation is a critical component of Java’s “write once, run anywhere” power, but it comes at the cost of long startup times.

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Set up continuous integration for .NET Core with OpenShift Pipelines

Set up continuous integration for .NET Core with OpenShift Pipelines

Have you ever wanted to set up continuous integration (CI) for .NET Core in a cloud-native way, but you didn’t know where to start? This article provides an overview, examples, and suggestions for developers who want to get started setting up a functioning cloud-native CI system for .NET Core.

We will use the new Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines feature to implement .NET Core CI. OpenShift Pipelines are based on the open source Tekton project. OpenShift Pipelines provide a cloud-native way to define a pipeline to build, test, deploy, and roll out your applications in a continuous integration workflow.

In this article, you will learn how to:

  1. Set up a simple .NET Core application.
  2. Install OpenShift Pipelines on Red Hat OpenShift.
  3. Create a simple pipeline manually.
  4. Create a Source-to-Image (S2I)-based pipeline.

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Troubleshooting user task errors in Red Hat Process Automation Manager and Red Hat JBoss BPM Suite

Troubleshooting user task errors in Red Hat Process Automation Manager and Red Hat JBoss BPM Suite

I’ve been around Red Hat JBoss BPM Suite (jBPM) and Red Hat Process Automation Manager (RHPAM) for many years. Over that time, I’ve learned a lot about the lesser-known aspects of this business process management engine.

If you are like most people, you might believe that user tasks are trivial, and learning about their details is unnecessary. Then, one day, you will find yourself troubleshooting an error like this one:

User '[User:'admin']' was unable to execution operation 'Start' on task id 287271 due to a no 'current status' match.

Receiving one too many similar error messages led me to learn everything that I know about user tasks, and I have decided to share my experience.

User tasks are a vital part of any business process management engine, jBPM included. Their behavior is defined by the OASIS Web Services—Human Task Specification, which has been fully adopted by Business Process Model and Notation (BPMN) 2.0—the standard for business processes diagrams. The spec defines two exceptionally important things that I will discuss in this article: The user task lifecycle and task access control. Without further ado, let’s jump right in.

Note: These troubleshooting tips are applicable to Red Hat JBoss BPM Suite 6.2 and above and Red Hat Process Automation Manager 7.

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Migrating from Fabric8 Maven Plugin to Eclipse JKube 1.0.0

Migrating from Fabric8 Maven Plugin to Eclipse JKube 1.0.0

The recent release of Eclipse JKube 1.0.0 means that the Fabric8 Maven Plugin is no longer supported. If you are currently using the Fabric8 Maven Plugin, this article provides instructions for migrating to JKube instead. I will also explain the relationship between Eclipse JKube and the Fabric8 Maven Plugin (they’re the same thing) and introduce the highlights of the new Eclipse JKube 1.0.0 release. These migration instructions are for developers working on the Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift platforms.

Eclipse JKube is the Fabric8 Maven Plugin

Eclipse JKube and the Fabric8 Maven Plugin are one and the same. Eclipse JKube was first released in 2014 under the name of Fabric8 Maven Plugin. The development team changed the name when we pre-released Eclipse JKube 0.1.0 in December 2019. For more about the name change, see my recent introduction to Eclipse JKube. This article focuses on the migration path to JKube 1.0.0.

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How to run Red Hat CodeReady Containers on Windows 10 Enterprise

How to run Red Hat CodeReady Containers on Windows 10 Enterprise

Red Hat CodeReady Containers allows you to spin up a small Red Hat OpenShift cluster on your local PC, with the need for a server, a cloud, or a team of operations people. For developers who want to get started immediately with cloud-native development, containers, and Kubernetes (as well as OpenShift), it’s a simple and slick tool. It runs on macOS, Linux, and all versions of Windows 10.

Except for Windows 10 Enterprise.

Which I painfully learned.

Because I lazily didn’t pay attention to the documentation.

OK, so I’m the only developer who glosses over documentation. Fortunately for you, I struggled and managed to get CRC running on my Windows 10 Enterprise notebook computer, and this article explains what is involved to get it working. So, in a sense, you’re welcome that I’m lazy.

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How to install the CouchbaseDB Operator for Red Hat OpenShift on your laptop using Red Hat CodeReady Containers and Red Hat Marketplace

How to install the CouchbaseDB Operator for Red Hat OpenShift on your laptop using Red Hat CodeReady Containers and Red Hat Marketplace

Red Hat Marketplace is an online store of sorts, where you can choose the software that you want to install and run on your Red Hat OpenShift cluster. The analogy is a phone app store, where you select an app, and it’s automagically installed on your phone. With Marketplace, you simply register your cluster(s), select the software that you want, and it is installed for you. It could not be easier.

In this article, I show you how to install Couchbase Server Enterprise Edition on an OpenShift cluster. In my case, the cluster is running on Fedora 32 using Red Hat CodeReady Containers (CRC). Couchbase Server Enterprise Edition is currently available as a free trial, and CRC is also available at zero cost. This setup offers a no-risk way to try containers, Kubernetes, OpenShift, and, in this case, Couchbase. This is definitely “developers playing around with the software”-level stuff.

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Install Red Hat OpenShift Operators on your laptop using Red Hat CodeReady Containers and Red Hat Marketplace

Install Red Hat OpenShift Operators on your laptop using Red Hat CodeReady Containers and Red Hat Marketplace

Red Hat CodeReady Containers (CRC) is the quickest way for developers to get started with clusters on Red Hat OpenShift 4.1 or newer. CodeReady Containers is designed to run on a local computer. It simplifies setup and testing by emulating the cloud development environment locally with all of the tools that you need to develop container-based applications.

Red Hat Marketplace is an open cloud marketplace that makes it easy to discover and purchase the certified, containerized tools you need to build enterprise-first applications. It was created to help developers using OpenShift build applications and deploy them across a hybrid cloud. Red Hat Marketplace works on any developer workstation that is running CodeReady Containers.

This article guides you through the steps of setting up Red Hat Marketplace and installing containerized products in your local CodeReady Containers-based OpenShift clusters.

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Add Java language support for Apache Camel K inside Eclipse Che

Add Java language support for Apache Camel K inside Eclipse Che

Apache Camel K should be as lightweight as possible. Therefore, the Camel K project provides standalone Java files that describe a Camel integration. The downside to this practice is that existing IDEs cannot provide complete support out of the box. A few months ago, I mentioned the Java language support for Apache Camel K that was discussed in Red Hat Visual Studio Code (VS Code) extension, and how it provides Java language support for Apache Camel K. In this article and demo, I show you how to do the same with Eclipse Che and che.openshift.io.

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Vulnerability analysis with Red Hat CodeReady Dependency Analytics and Snyk Intel

Vulnerability analysis with Red Hat CodeReady Dependency Analytics and Snyk Intel

Red Hat CodeReady Dependency Analytics is a hosted service on OpenShift that provides vulnerability and compliance analysis for your applications, directly from your IDE. It automatically analyzes your software composition and provides recommendations to address security holes and licensing issues. The 0.1 release of CodeReady Dependency Analytics includes access to the Snyk Intel Vulnerability Database, which is a curated database of both unique and known open source software security advisories.

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