Guide to starting use AWX on top of OpenShift, the upstream of Red Hat Ansible Tower

Introduction

This is the first post in a series that shows how to use the new release of the community version of Red Hat Ansible Tower. In this post, we will start with the installation of AWX on top of OpenShift. In the next post, I’ll show how to set a dynamic inventory to access the servers from AWS (EC2) and how to run a playbook to access our AWS EC2 inventory.

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How to quick install Red Hat Mobile on Openshift

Introduction

As you may already know, the Red Hat Mobile Application Platform (RHMAP) is available as a self-administered, on-premise, installation as well as a hosted platform. This offers more opportunities for customers to benefit from increased security, flexibility and control over their platform.

Note: This installation is strictly for sandbox demonstration purposes. In the interests of simplicity, it will be running on infrastructure that will not be secure so no confidential data should be stored in this instance.

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Fuse development environment with Development Suite installer

Red Hat JBoss Fuse is an open source, lightweight and modular integration platform that allows you to connect services and systems across your entire application portfolio. If you’re familiar with Fuse, you’re probably familiar with the Fuse Tooling that comes with Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio.

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JBoss A-MQ on OpenShift Cheat Sheet

We hear about Microservices a lot nowadays. Its implementation requires us to deal with new challenges. A key question that comes with using microservices is how to handle interactions in an asynchronous way. The answer to that is messaging.

Among other things, messaging features the following:

  • Loose coupling since it decouples client from services.
  • Improved availability since the message broker buffers messages until the consumer is able to process them.
  • Supports a variety of communication patterns including request/reply, notifications, request/async response, publish/subscribe, publish/async response and more.

One of the most famous products in messaging is JBoss A-MQ. Among the questions I receive from customers is whether it’s possible to run Red Hat JBoss A-MQ on Red Hat OpenShift. The answer is yes, Red Hat JBoss A-MQ (A-MQ) is available as a containerized image that is designed for use with OpenShift. It allows developers to quickly deploy an A-MQ message broker in a hybrid cloud environment.

The configuration of the broker can be performed two ways:

Before we proceed with how to deploy A-MQ on OpenShift, let’s take a look at different A-MQ architectures in high availability environment.

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Using Falcon to cleanup Satellite host records that belong to terminated OSP instances

Overview

In an environment where OpenStack instances are automatically subscribed to Satellite, it is important that Satellite is notified of terminated instances so that is can safely delete its host record. Not doing so will:

  • Exhaust the available subscriptions, leading to unsubscribed hosts not being able to apply updates and security errata.
  • In the event that an emergency security errata needs to be deployed across the organization, Satellite administrators would be unable to determine if a host was either off or terminated, leading to uncertainty with their security posture.

In smaller environments, where one team is responsible for both OSP and Satellite, it’s possible to have one system administrator do this by using their administrator level access across both systems to determine which host records can be safely deleted in Satellite when the corresponding instance no longer exists.

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Entropy in RHEL based cloud instances

According to Wikipedia, entropy is the randomness collected by an operating system or application for use in cryptography or other uses that require random data.

Entropy is often overlooked, misconfigured or forgotten and it can originate in sporadic errors whether it can be timeouts, refused connections, etc. Such errors are difficult to debug as the errors happen only when there is not enough entropy available.

This article tries to explain briefly how to check if this can be a problem in a RHEL system and how to fix it.

NOTE: This article is meant to provide some helpful hints about entropy. It is not meant to be exhaustive or definitive. There are hundreds of information sources on the Internet such as KCS articles; https://access.redhat.com/articles/221583 and https://access.redhat.com/solutions/19866 where this article is based. Check the bibliography section for more information.

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