Opinion

7 Things to Worry About w/Microservices

7 Things to Worry About w/Microservices

So recently, the idea that Monoliths should be discouraged and that Microservices be embraced has taken over the Software Development space. A project made into a single code base is to be taken out and broken into manageable pieces. It is better to work with manageable sub-units than a whole bunch of one big stuff. Well, as the saying goes, small-scale always wins.

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Naming Matters

Naming Matters

Everything around us has a name, I mean everything, otherwise, how would we be able to refer to them, particularly in programming. From our project name, directories, variables, and more, a name must be associated with every item or else we lose their meaning and use.

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A Post Mortem on Madness, or Why Process Matters

A Post Mortem on Madness, or Why Process Matters

So, my first programming job was part of the Duke Basketball IT department, while I was enrolled as an undergraduate. To be fair, it wasn’t really a programming job, mostly just churning out scouting reports and videos, but it was a lot of fun. I really liked basketball back then. I wasn’t any good at it but I enjoyed playing all the same, and I had a lot of fun watching it. And as most people know, the culmination of the college basketball season is a 68-team single elimination tournament called March Madness. And it is just that, Madness; employee productivity plummets, players, coaches, and spectators spend thousands of dollars traveling all over the country with a single day’s notice, and a lot of scouting reports get generated. Most people look forward to it, both the participants and the fans, but due to a series of mistakes and poor decisions, I have grown to dread March Madness…

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Observations on Porting from .NET Framework to .NET Core

Observations on Porting from .NET Framework to .NET Core

You’ve heard that .NET has gone open source. You’ve also heard that it has gone cross-platform. And you’ve even heard that Red Hat is shipping a supported version of .NET on Red Hat Enterprise Linux. So maybe you are thinking to yourself, “wow, this is fantastic! I’m going to copy these EXEs and DLLs of my .NET application over to my Red Hat machine and run them!”

Well, unfortunately, it’s not going to be quite that easy. At least not today.

First and foremost, the open source version of .NET is called “.NET Core.” It is available for many platforms, including Windows and Linux. Those .NET projects and applications that you already have running, however, were built on and for .NET Framework. And .NET Framework and .NET Core are not the same thing; they are more like siblings, which also implies that one is not a subset or child of the other.

“Well, then, what’s the point?!”

The good news is that while they are siblings, they do look a lot alike. Although they’re not identical twins, you’ll definitely recognize them as being from the same immediate family. As such, it is possible to port many existing .NET Framework applications to .NET Core.

“How hard is it to port something?”

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Intel Joule Debate: A maker platform ready for widespread IoT use?

Intel Developer Forum 2016 (IDF) produced quite a few announcements this year, including the Joule, a powerful IoT dev kit. Although targeted at makers, Intel and partners spoke about how this Joule can be used for industrial IoT use cases — cases like augmented reality safety glasses for manufacturing environments from PivotHead.

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