Operating System

What Red Hat OpenShift Connector for JetBrains products offers developers

What Red Hat OpenShift Connector for JetBrains products offers developers

We are extremely pleased to announce that the preview release of the Red Hat OpenShift Connector for JetBrains products (IntelliJ IDEA, WebStorm, etc.) is now available in Preview Mode and supports Java and Node.js components. You can download the OpenShift Connector plugin from the JetBrains marketplace or install it directly from the plugins gallery in JetBrains products.

In this article, we’ll look at features and benefits of the plugin and installation details, and show a demo of how using the plugin improves the end-to-end experience of developing and deploying Spring Boot applications to your OpenShift cluster.

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The evolution of serverless and FaaS: Knative brings change

The evolution of serverless and FaaS: Knative brings change

Are serverless and Function as a Service (FaaS) the same thing?

No, they’re not.

Wait. Yes, they are.

Frustrating, right? With terms being thrown about at conferences, in articles (I’m looking at myself right now), conversations, etc., things can be confusing (or, sadly, sometimes misleading). Let’s take a look at some aspects of serverless and FaaS to see where things stand.

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Avoiding Windows rsync permission problems with Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio

Avoiding Windows rsync permission problems with Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio

The JBoss Tools OpenShift tooling uses rsync to sync files between your local workstation and the running pods on an OpenShift cluster. This is used by the OpenShift server adapter to provide hot deploy and debugging features for the developer. If you’re running Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio or JBoss Tools on Windows, there are some issues with file permissions that can be painful. These problems are due to file permission model used on the underlying Windows filesystem being different than the model used by Linux. Linux and macOS users won’t run into these problems. The aim of this article is to explain the root cause and how to fix it.

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Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio on MacOS X- an alternative setup

The  recommended steps for setting up the Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio (JBDS), on all supported platforms, are found here. The instructions are pretty straight-forward and it is enough to get started right away – as long as you have a suitable java SDK installed on your machine.

However, if I go along that path, I would later have to deal with the Java SDK updates to go along with the compatibility of the existing tools. Eventually, I may end up having to install multiple versions of the Java SDK.

This led me to look for other alternatives. I thought to myself, the Linux’y way to go would be to run the JBDS as a container and have it display on my Desktop. I figured that I already have the tools for such task: XQuartz as an X11 server, socat to relay the display ports, and my Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) virtual machine. Yey!

The following are the steps on how I got all these to work together.

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Using Visual Studio with Linux (Hint: Windows is still required)

Running .NET on Linux, using the Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK), means your Linux VM is running “headless” — you don’t have a desktop UI. You have a command line, and that’s it.

Note: If you aren’t running .NET on Linux, hop over to the Red Hat Developer’s web page and download the CDK to get started.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux’s built-in editor, VIM, which is launched by the command vi, is not a full-featured development environment. Not even close. That’s like saying a first-grader in the annual holiday play isn’t Meryl Streep; there’s a world of difference.

So what is a Windows developer to do? You’re accustomed to using Visual Studio — the worlds greatest development environment in my not-so-humble opinion — but you want to start developing code on your Linux VM.

The short answer is “Shared Volume”. Since we’re going to assume that the CDK is being used, this blog post will get down to the very specifics you need. Following these instructions, you can share a directory|folder (“directory” is the chosen vocabulary in Linux; “folder” is more frequently used in Windows) between the Linux VM and Windows, then use any editor to edit your code. Of course, you’ll choose Visual Studio, because it’s so awesome.

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CI Security on Red Hat Enterprise Linux from a Windows Perspective

The sheer number of tasks involved in building out automation infrastructure for a new organization never ceases to amaze me. One of the most often overlooked groups of tasks, however, is security. Though I am in no way a security expert, I know there are some basic steps we should take to protect ourselves and our precious systems.

I also know that not everyone who administers RHEL systems has an extensive background working with Linux. If, like me, you’re normally a Windows admin, yet you find yourself having to secure a RHEL system, fret not. Here are some tips for adapting what you already know about Windows security best practices to RHEL environments.

(Some of) The Basics

For our purposes here, I’m going to run through three things that I would do quickly on Windows and discuss their equivalent on RHEL. We’re in no danger of this becoming a comprehensive guide. As far as starting points go, it should be fair enough.

  • Software Updates
  • User/Group Isolation
  • Port Closings

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