Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform

Red Hat Extends JBoss Middleware to OpenShift

Excerpts from Red Hat announcement: Red Hat Doubles Down on Enterprise PaaS: Reveals Plans for First Full Complement of Enterprise Middleware Services within OpenShift

Red Hat recently announced JBoss xPaaS services for OpenShift which provides a rich set of enterprise application, integration and business process automation capabilities and services in an extensible open PaaS platform, and is uniquely positioned to enable accelerated development and deployment of next-generation enterprise applications and business processes in the cloud.  Per the announcement, Gartner uses the term xPaaS to describe the whole spectrum of specialized middleware services that can be offered as PaaS.  See Mark Little’s blog on xPaaS.

The initial phase of Red Hat’s PaaS strategy was marked by the introduction of OpenShift Enterprise, which combined the core enterprise technologies that power OpenShift, including Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform, into an integrated open hybrid cloud application platform, followed by the commercial availability of OpenShift Online, Red Hat’s public PaaS offering.

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A Puppet Module for tuned-adm

Some months ago, I developed and released a small Puppet module for tuned-adm. As this tool is a nice feature of RHEL, I think it is only fair from me to advertise about it here, on the Red Hat developer blog.

Quick overview of ‘tuned-adm’

(Photo credit: Accretion Disc)

To make this brief, this command will take care of tuning the operating system for you, based on the usage you want to make of it. For instance, if you want this system to be a regular server, you’ll use the ‘throughput-performance’ profile, while if you are running your Linux kernel on a laptop, you might prefer the ‘powersave’ profile, to protect your battery, and make it last longer.

To have a better idea of what options are available on your system, you can simply run the following command:

$ tuned-adm list
Available profiles:
- virtual-guest
- latency-performance
- powersave
- balanced
- throughput-performance
- virtual-host
Current active profile: /usr/lib/tuned/powersave/tuned.conf

And with the command ‘active’, you can quickly check, which profile has been activated:

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Why PaaS and how does it work (just enough for Devs & not linux gurus)

Here’s a video of my OpenShift PaaS session from Developer Exchange day in Boston.  It’s something I’ve delivered a bunch of times – I hope you enjoy it!

Session Abstract:

Tired of waiting weeks to get a server or spinning up and configuring your virtual servers. Come learn about how PaaS can make you into a happier and more productive coder. We will start by teaching you the meaning behind some acronyms you see thrown around – IaaS, PaaS, and SaaS. Next we turn to PaaS and talk about why it is a developers dream come true. From there we will use Red Hat’s Open Source PaaS, OpenShift, to demonstrate how easy it is to get started with a PHP web application. This will be about 1/3 slide and 2/3 demo and code in action. Bring your laptop if you want to follow along – it is that easy. If time permits we may also show a little bit of working with MySQL and PHP on OpenShift. Come in skeptical leave with a smile and some working code.

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Learning Django with OpenShift

Background

The goal of this article is use the OpenShift Platform as a Service (PaaS) as a learning platform for Django. Most of the technical articles out there about running Django on OpenShift assume the user already understands how to administer Django environments and projects. This article is written from the perspective of someone who has done some python programming and wants to learn some Django without doing a bunch of setup work.

Since each OpenShift Gear “…is a container with a set of resources that allows users to run their applications”, a user can ssh in to test, troubleshoot, debug and learn. This turns out to be quite convenient for learning Django.

Django Quickstart

First, we must deploy an OpenShift application. The deployment is completely automated with the Django Quickstart. Once completed, the web interface will return all of the connection information necessary for Django, Git, and SSH. Estimate 5 minutes.

https://www.openshift.com/quickstarts/django -> Deploy Now

Screenshot-Django-Quickstart

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