OpenShift

How to reduce Red Hat Fuse image size

How to reduce Red Hat Fuse image size

Red Hat Fuse is a leading integration platform, which is capable of solving any given problem with simple enterprise integration patterns (EIP).  Over time, Red Hat Fuse has evolved to cater to a wide range of infrastructure needs.

For more information on each of these, check out the Red Hat Fuse documentation. The Fuse on Red Hat OpenShift flavor uses a Fuse image that has runtime components packaged inside a Linux container image.  This article will discuss how to reduce the size of the Fuse image. The same principle can be used for other images.

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How to configure Red Hat OpenShift 4 to use Auth0

How to configure Red Hat OpenShift 4 to use Auth0

My colleague and I recently had to stand up a Red Hat OpenShift 4 cluster for a customer to determine how difficult it would be for them to port their application. Although they could have achieved a similar outcome with CodeReady Containers, their local development machines did not have enough resources (8GB RAM minimum, which is one problem of developing on tablets).

To reduce the overhead of adding and removing users from the project during the trial, we decided to skip over the simple HTPasswd provider and use the OAuth provider backed by Auth0. We also wanted to publish our guide to make it easier for others to adopt a similar deployment.

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Getting started with Golang Operators by using Operator SDK

Getting started with Golang Operators by using Operator SDK

The open source Operator Framework is a toolkit to manage Kubernetes-native applications. The framework and its features provide the ability to develop solutions to simplify some complexities, such as the process to install, configure, manage and package applications on Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift. It provides the ability to use a client to perform CRUD actions, that is, operations to create, read, update, and delete data on these platforms.

By using operators, it’s possible not only to provide all expected resources but also to manage them dynamically, programmatically, and at execution time. To illustrate this idea, imagine if someone accidentally changed a configuration or removed a resource by mistake; in this case, the operator could fix it without any human intervention. We’ll take a look at Operators and the Operator SDK in this article.

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Deploy Red Hat AMQ Streams and Fuse on OpenShift Container Platform 4

Deploy Red Hat AMQ Streams and Fuse on OpenShift Container Platform 4

In the following video, I demonstrate how to deploy Red Hat AMQ Streams (based on upstream Apache Kafka) on OpenShift 4.

I will also demonstrate how to use AMQ Streams in a basic way using Red Hat Fuse.  There is a Camel route exposing a REST endpoint at /goodbye, which—when hit—sends a “Goodbye World” message to the topic.  There is also a timer sending “Hello World” messages periodically to the topic.  A separate Camel route consumes from the topic and logs the messages for our visibility.

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4 steps to set up the MQTT secure client for Red Hat AMQ 7.4 on OpenShift

4 steps to set up the MQTT secure client for Red Hat AMQ 7.4 on OpenShift

In this article, we show how to set up Red Hat AMQ 7.4 on Red Hat OpenShift. Also, we show how to connect the external Message Queuing Telemetry Transport (MQTT) secure client to the AMQ 7.4 platform. MQTT is a Java-based client that uses the Eclipse Paho library and can publish and consume messages from Red Hat AMQ 7.4 Broker on OpenShift using secure transport. These commands and code have been verified with OpenShift 3.11.

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Using Red Hat OpenShift image streams with Kubernetes deployments

Using Red Hat OpenShift image streams with Kubernetes deployments

This article demonstrates an application update scenario which leverages Red Hat OpenShift image streams together with standard Kubernetes native resources. It also shows how image streams automatically redeploy application pods after an update to their container image.

Best of all, Kubernetes resources enhanced with OpenShift image streams are still compatible with standard Kubernetes clusters. This fact enables the use of the same resource definitions to support multiple Kubernetes distributions, and at the same time take advantage of features unique to OpenShift.

At the end of this article, we present a few considerations around using image IDs and image name tags to manage your ability to roll back to previous versions of an application.

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DevNation Live Bengaluru: 9 steps to awesome with Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift

DevNation Live Bengaluru: 9 steps to awesome with Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift

Our first DevNation Live regional event was held in Bengaluru, India in July. This free technology event focused on open source innovations, with sessions presented by elite Red Hat technologists.

Kubernetes has become the de facto standard for hybrid cloud portable application architecture, and in this session, Burr Sutter shows why Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift provide the ideal solution for deploying and managing microservices in your organization.

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Understanding Red Hat OpenShift’s Application Monitoring Operator

Understanding Red Hat OpenShift’s Application Monitoring Operator

Monitoring systems are usually composed of three layers: a database layer that hosts metrics data, a layer to display the stored metric data graphically in dashboards, and an alerting layer to send out notifications via methods such as email, on-call notification systems, and chat platforms. This article presents an overview of the components used in Red Hat OpenShift‘s Application Monitoring Operator, how to install them using the Operator, and an example of the Operator in action.

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Red Hat OpenShift 4 on your laptop: Introducing Red Hat CodeReady Containers

Red Hat OpenShift 4 on your laptop: Introducing Red Hat CodeReady Containers

We are pleased to announce that Red Hat CodeReady Containers is now available as a Developer Preview. CodeReady Containers brings a minimal, preconfigured OpenShift 4.1 or newer cluster to your local laptop or desktop computer for development and testing purposes. CodeReady Containers supports native hypervisors for Linux, macOS, and Windows 10. You can download CodeReady Containers from the Red Hat CodeReady Containers product page.

CodeReady Containers is designed for local development and testing on an OpenShift 4 cluster. For running an OpenShift 3 cluster locally, see Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK) or Minishift.

In this article, we’ll look at the features and benefits of CodeReady Containers, show a demo of how easy it is to create a local Red Hat OpenShift 4 cluster, and show how to deploy an application on top of it.

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Cloud-native messaging on Red Hat OpenShift with Quarkus and AMQ Online

Cloud-native messaging on Red Hat OpenShift with Quarkus and AMQ Online

Quarkus is a Kubernetes-native Java stack tailored for GraalVM and OpenJDK HotSpot, crafted from the best of breed Java libraries and standards, according to the project website. Starting with the 0.17.0 release, Quarkus supports using the Advanced Message Queuing Protocol (AMQP), which is an open standard for passing business messages between applications or organizations.

Red Hat AMQ Online is a Red Hat OpenShift-based mechanism for delivering messaging as a managed service. Previously, we have seen how to use AMQ Online to provision messaging. In this article, we will combine AMQ Online and Quarkus to show how you can create a modern messaging setup on OpenShift using two new technologies from the messaging space.

The guide assumes you have an installation of AMQ Online on OpenShift. Read the installation guide for more information. AMQ Online is based on the EnMasse open source project.

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