Mobile

Integration of external application details (Part 3)

Integration of external application details (Part 3)

In Part 2 of this series, we took a high-level view of the common architectural elements that determine how your integration becomes the key to transforming your customer experience.

I laid out how I’ve approached the use case and how I’ve used successful customer portfolio solutions as the basis for researching a generic architectural blueprint. The only thing left to cover was the order in which you’ll be led through the blueprint details.

This article takes you deeper to cover details pertaining to the specific elements (mobile and web application deployments) of the generic architectural overview.

Continue reading “Integration of external application details (Part 3)”

Share
Building Red Hat Mobile Applications on your own hardware

Building Red Hat Mobile Applications on your own hardware

This guide is related to the recent deprecation of the Red Hat Mobile Application Platform Build Farm. Throughout this guide, we’ll guide you through the steps required to build on a machine of your own an application that was originally built using the Build Farm. Further information surrounding the Build Farm deprecation is available in our product release notes.

Red Hat Mobile Supported Configurations Documentation

Before getting started, it’s important to be aware of the versions of the tools, frameworks, and SDKs that the Build Farm uses to build mobile applications. This information can be found on the Red Hat Mobile Application Platform Supported Configurations page. This guide will call out the specific versions in each section and also note where you need to confirm versions for your specific project and/or requirements.

Continue reading “Building Red Hat Mobile Applications on your own hardware”

Share
Configuring the MongoDB WiredTiger memory cache for RHMAP

Configuring the MongoDB WiredTiger memory cache for RHMAP

This article describes how to configure MongoDB’s WiredTiger memory cache in Red Hat Mobile Application Platform (RHMAP) to prevent high-usage memory issues and Nagios alerts. If the WiredTiger cache consumes all the memory available for a container, memory issues and Nagios alerts will occur.

The WiredTiger storage engine is the default storage engine starting in MongoDB version 3.2. It uses MultiVersion Concurrency Control (MVCC) architecture for write operations in order to allow multiple different modifications to the same document at the same time.

WiredTiger also caches data and creates checkpoints to give you the ability to recover anytime it’s necessary. For example, if a MongoDB image deployed in a container fails, it is useful to recover the data that was not persisted. Additionally, WiredTiger can recover un-checkpointed data with its journal files. See the journal documentation and snapshots and checkpoint documentation for more information.

Continue reading “Configuring the MongoDB WiredTiger memory cache for RHMAP”

Share
Integrating Intercede RapID with Red Hat Mobile and OpenShift

Integrating Intercede RapID with Red Hat Mobile and OpenShift

At Red Hat Mobile we understand the need for a flexible product that enables our customers to integrate with the tools they need to build their current and future applications. Our position as a leading contributor to the Kubernetes project ensures that the Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform offers this tremendous flexibility to customers and end users.

Red Hat Mobile also supports highly flexible integrations to a range of 3rd party services and products. In this article, we’ll demonstrate how Red Hat Mobile v4 and OpenShift v3 enable customers to rapidly deploy and secure their mobile applications by integrating with a third party product provided by Intercede. We’ll be using Intercede’s RapID product to enable two-way TLS (often referred to as Client Certificate Authentication or CCA) for our mobile application.

Continue reading “Integrating Intercede RapID with Red Hat Mobile and OpenShift”

Share
OpenID Connect Identity Brokering with Red Hat Single Sign-On

OpenID Connect Identity Brokering with Red Hat Single Sign-On

Introduction

In this post, I will provide a walk through of how to set up Identity Brokering on an RH-SSO server.

Red Hat Single Sign-On (RH-SSO) provides Web single sign-on and identity federation based on SAML 2.0, OpenID Connect and OAuth 2.0 specifications.

For this tutorial, you will need:

  • An RH-SSO Instance.
  • A Web/Mobile Application with an OpenID Connect adapter.
  • An OpenID Connect Provider Server (Such as Keycloak) to be used as the 3rd Party Identity Provider.

Continue reading “OpenID Connect Identity Brokering with Red Hat Single Sign-On”

Share
How to quick install Red Hat Mobile on Openshift

How to quick install Red Hat Mobile on Openshift

Introduction

As you may already know, the Red Hat Mobile Application Platform (RHMAP) is available as a self-administered, on-premise, installation as well as a hosted platform. This offers more opportunities for customers to benefit from increased security, flexibility and control over their platform.

Note: This installation is strictly for sandbox demonstration purposes. In the interests of simplicity, it will be running on infrastructure that will not be secure so no confidential data should be stored in this instance.

Continue reading “How to quick install Red Hat Mobile on Openshift”

Share
Using New Relic in Red Hat Mobile Node.js Applications

Using New Relic in Red Hat Mobile Node.js Applications

Introduction

New Relic is an application-monitoring platform that provides in-depth analytics and analysis for applications regardless of the type of environment where they are deployed, or as New Relic put it themselves:

“Gain end-to-end visibility across your customer experience, application performance, and dynamic infrastructure with the New Relic Digital Intelligence Platform.” – New Relic

You might ask why there’s a use for New Relic’s monitoring capabilities when Red Hat Mobile Application Platform (RHMAP) and OpenShift Container Platform both offer insights into the CPU, Disk, Memory, and general resource utilization of your server-side applications. While these generic resource reports are valuable, they might not offer the detail required to debug a specific issue. Since New Relic is built as an analytics platform from the ground up it is capable of providing unique insights into the specific runtime of your applications. For example, the JavaScript code deployed in Node.js applications is run using the V8 JavaScript engine which has a life-cycle that can have a significant impact on the performance of your application depending on how you’ve written it. Utilizing New Relic’s Node.js module provides a real-time view of V8 engine performance and how they might be affecting the performance of your production application. By using this data, you can refine your application code to reduce memory usage, which in turn can free CPU resources due to less frequent garbage collections. Neat!

Continue reading “Using New Relic in Red Hat Mobile Node.js Applications”

Share