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New features in Red Hat CodeReady Studio 12.16.0.GA and JBoss Tools 4.16.0.Final for Eclipse 2020-06

New features in Red Hat CodeReady Studio 12.16.0.GA and JBoss Tools 4.16.0.Final for Eclipse 2020-06

JBoss Tools 4.16.0 and Red Hat CodeReady Studio 12.16 for Eclipse 4.16 (2020-06) are now available. For this release, we focused on improving Quarkus– and container-based development and fixing bugs. We also updated the Hibernate Tools runtime provider and Java Developer Tools (JDT) extensions, which are now compatible with Java 14. Additionally, we made many changes to platform views, dialogs, and toolbars in the user interface (UI).

This article is an overview of what’s new in JBoss Tools 4.16.0 and Red Hat CodeReady Studio 12.16 for Eclipse 4.16 (2020-06).

Installation

First, let’s look at how to install these updates. CodeReady Studio (previously Red Hat Developer Studio) comes with everything pre-bundled in its installer. Simply download the installer from the Red Hat CodeReady Studio product page and run it as follows:

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Fixing the oc and Red Hat OpenShift install “not downloaded” error on macOS

Fixing the oc and Red Hat OpenShift install “not downloaded” error on macOS

I recently decided to use my macOS machine to create a Red Hat OpenShift cluster. After downloading the openshift-install command-line tool and running it, however, I received the following error:

(Yes, I know the above error is related to the oc command, but it also threw the error and, after I fixed the openshift-install command, I was unable to “unfix” it.)

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Managing JBoss EAP/Wildfly using Jcliff

Managing JBoss EAP/Wildfly using Jcliff

Systems management can be a difficult task. Not only does one need to determine what the end state should be but, more importantly, how to ensure systems attain and remain at this state. Doing so in an automated fashion is just as critical, because there may be a large number of target instances. In regard to enterprise Java middleware application servers, these instances are typically configured using a set of XML based files. Although these files may be manually configured, most application servers have a command-line based tool or set of tools that abstracts the end user from having to worry about the underlying configuration. WebSphere Liberty includes a variety of tools to manage these resources, whereas JBoss contains the jboss-cli tool.

Although each tool accomplishes its utilitarian use case as it allows for proper server management, it does fail to adhere to one of the principles of automation and configuration management: idempotence. Ensuring the desired state does not equate to executing the same action with every iteration. Additional intelligence must be introduced. Along with idempotence, another core principle of configuration management is that values be expressed declaratively and stored in a version control system.

Jcliff is a Java-based utility that is built on top of the JBoss command-line interface and allows for the desired intent for the server configuration to be expressed declaratively, which in turn can be stored in a version control system. We’ll provide an overview of the Jcliff utility including inherent benefits, installation options, and several examples showcasing the use.

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Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio on MacOS X- an alternative setup

The  recommended steps for setting up the Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio (JBDS), on all supported platforms, are found here. The instructions are pretty straight-forward and it is enough to get started right away – as long as you have a suitable java SDK installed on your machine.

However, if I go along that path, I would later have to deal with the Java SDK updates to go along with the compatibility of the existing tools. Eventually, I may end up having to install multiple versions of the Java SDK.

This led me to look for other alternatives. I thought to myself, the Linux’y way to go would be to run the JBDS as a container and have it display on my Desktop. I figured that I already have the tools for such task: XQuartz as an X11 server, socat to relay the display ports, and my Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) virtual machine. Yey!

The following are the steps on how I got all these to work together.

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