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From zero to Quarkus and Knative: The easy way

From zero to Quarkus and Knative: The easy way

You’ve probably already read about Quarkus, but you may not know that the superfast startup speed of Quarkus makes it the best candidate for working with Knative and serverless for your Function-as-a-Service (FaaS) projects.

Quarkus, also known as Supersonic, Subatomic Java, is a Kubernetes native Java stack tailored for GraalVM and OpenJDK HotSpot, crafted from the best-of-breed Java libraries and standards. Knative is a Kubernetes-based platform to build, deploy, and manage modern serverless workloads. You can learn more in this article series.

This article does not provide a full deep dive on Knative or Quarkus. Instead, I aim to give you a quick and easy way to start playing with both technologies so you can further explore on your own.

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The evolution of serverless and FaaS: Knative brings change

The evolution of serverless and FaaS: Knative brings change

Are serverless and Function as a Service (FaaS) the same thing?

No, they’re not.

Wait. Yes, they are.

Frustrating, right? With terms being thrown about at conferences, in articles (I’m looking at myself right now), conversations, etc., things can be confusing (or, sadly, sometimes misleading). Let’s take a look at some aspects of serverless and FaaS to see where things stand.

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Init Container Build Pattern: Knative build with plain old Kubernetes deployment

Init Container Build Pattern: Knative build with plain old Kubernetes deployment

With Kubernetes evolving at supersonic speed and seeing a lot of adoption in the enterprise world, the developer community is now looking for solutions to common Kubernetes problems, such as patterns. In this article, I will explore a new Kubernetes pattern using Init Containers.

Let’s start with the use case that gave birth to this problem: Quarkus—Supersonic and Subatomic Java—has excited the Java developer community with its amazing speed and all new native build artifact for Java applications. As one of those excited developers, I want to quickly build and deploy a Quarkus application on to Kubernetes.

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Quarking Drools: How we turned a 13-year-old Java project into a first-class serverless component

Quarking Drools: How we turned a 13-year-old Java project into a first-class serverless component

“The question of whether a computer can think is no more interesting than the question of whether a submarine can swim.” (Edsger W. Dijkstra)

Rule-based artificial intelligence (AI) is often overlooked, possibly because people think it’s only useful in heavyweight enterprise software products. However, that’s not necessarily true. Simply put, a rule engine is just a piece of software that allows you to separate domain and business-specific constraint from the main application flow. We are part of the team developing and maintaining Drools—the world’s most popular open source rule engine and part of Red Hat—and, in this article, we will describe how we are changing Drools to make it part of the cloud and serverless revolution.

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