Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform

What Does the New JBoss EAP CD Release Stream Mean for Developers?

A new release stream of Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform is now available: JBoss EAP continuous delivery (JBoss EAP CD).

JBoss EAP CD provides rapid incremental releases of new JBoss EAP capabilities approximately every quarter and is delivered only in Red Hat OpenShift image format.

What does this new JBoss EAP CD release stream mean for developers?

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Elytron: A New Security Framework in WildFly/JBoss EAP

Elytron is a new security framework that ships with WildFly version 10 and Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (EAP) 7.1. This project is a complete replacement of PicketBox and JAAS. Elytron is a single security framework that will be usable for securing management access to the server and for securing applications deployed in WildFly. You can still use the legacy security framework, which is PicketBox, but it is a deprecated module; hence, there is no guarantee that PicketBox will be included in future releases of WildFly. In this article, we will explore the components of Elytron and how to configure them in Wildfly.

The Elytron project covers the following: 

  • SSL/TLS
  • Secure credential storage
  • Authentication
  • Authorization

In this article, we are going to explore using SSL/TLS in WildFly with Elytron.

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It’s Time To Accelerate Your Application Development With Red Hat JBoss Middleware And Microsoft Azure

The role of applications has changed dramatically. In the past, applications were running businesses, but primarily relegated to the background. They were critical, but more operational in the sense that they kept businesses running, more or less. Today, organizations can use applications as a competitive advantage. In fact, a well-developed, well-timed application can disrupt an entire industry. Just take a look at the hotel, taxi, and movie rental industries respectively.

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Enabling SAML-based SSO with Remote EJB through Picketlink

Lets suppose that you have a remote Enterprise JavaBeans (EJB) application where the EJB client is a service pack (SP) application in a Security Assertion Markup Language (SAML) architecture. You would like your remote EJB to be authenticated using same assertion which was used for SP.

Before proceeding with this tutorial, you should have a basic understanding of EJB and Picketlink.

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Develop and Deploy on OpenShift Online Starter using Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio

The OpenShift Online Starter platform is available for free: visit https://manage.openshift.com/. It is based on Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform 3.7. This offering allows you to play with OpenShift Container Platform and deploy artifacts. The purpose of the article is to describe how to use Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio or JBoss Tools together with this online platform.

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New with JBoss EAP 7.1: Credential Store

In previous versions of JBoss EAP, the primary method of securely storing credentials and other sensitive strings was to use a password vault. A password vault stopped you from having to save passwords and other sensitive strings in plain text within the JBoss EAP configuration files.

However, a password vault has a few drawbacks. For example, each JBoss EAP server can only use one password vault, and all management of the password vault has to be done with an external tool.

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The State of Microservices Survey 2017 – Eight trends you need to know

During the fall of 2017, we conducted a microservices survey with our Red Hat Middleware and Red Hat OpenShift customers. Here are eight interesting trends discerned by the results:

I. Microservices are being used to re-architect existing applications as much as for brand new projects

There seems to be a strong emphasis in the market by technology vendors for positioning microservices as being only for new projects.  However, our survey reveals that organizations are also using microservices to re-architect existing and legacy applications.

Sixty-seven percent of Red Hat Middleware customers and 79 percent of Red Hat OpenShift customers indicated this. This data tells us that microservices offer value to users all along their IT transformation journey — whether they are just looking to update their current application portfolio or are gearing up new initiatives. So, if you are only focused on greenfield projects for microservices, it may be a good idea to also start evaluating your existing applications for a microservice re-architecture analysis. Microservices introduce a set of benefits that our customers have already started seeing, and they are applying these benefits not just to new projects but to existing ones as well.

II. Customers prefer a multi-runtime/multi-technology/multi-framework approach for microservices

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Dynamically Creating Java Keystores in OpenShift

Introduction

With a simple annotation to a service, you can dynamically create certificates in OpenShift.

Certificates created this way are in PEM (base64-encoded certificates) format and cannot be directly consumed by Java applications, which need certificates to be stored in Java KeyStores.

In this post, we are going to show a simple approach to enable Java applications to benefit from certificates dynamically created by OpenShift.

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