JBoss A-MQ

Self-service messaging with Red Hat AMQ Online and GitOps

Self-service messaging with Red Hat AMQ Online and GitOps

This article explores the service model of Red Hat AMQ Online 1.1 and how it maps to a GitOps workflow for different teams in your organization. For more information on new features in AMQ Online 1.1, see the release notes.

AMQ Online is an operator of stateful messaging services running on Red Hat OpenShift. AMQ Online is built around the principle that the responsibility of operating the messaging service is separate from the tenants consuming it. The operations team in can manage the messaging infrastructure, while the development teams provision messaging in a self-service manner, just as if they were using a public cloud service.

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Automated migration from JBoss AMQ 6 to Red Hat AMQ 7 on Red Hat OpenShift

Automated migration from JBoss AMQ 6 to Red Hat AMQ 7 on Red Hat OpenShift

Since Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform was first released, Red Hat Middleware products were provided to deploy on it and help developers to build more complex solutions. Messaging Brokers are a very important piece in most new application architectures, such as microservices, event sourcing, and CQRS. Red Hat JBoss AMQ was provided from the beginning to deploy Messaging Brokers on Red Hat OpenShift easily.

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Using Quiver with AMQ on Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform

Using Quiver with AMQ on Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform

As part of the Red Hat UKI Professional Services team, I have worked with several customers who are implementing AMQ Broker on Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform (OCP). One question customers typically ask is, “How do we validate that the AMQ configuration is correct for our scenario?” Previously, I would have suggested one of the following:

These tools can give you indicators around:

  • Is the broker up and running? That is, can it receive/publish messages for this configuration?
  • Can the broker handle a certain performance characteristic? That is, what is my minimum publish rate per second for this configuration?
  • And much more.

The problem with these tools is that you cannot choose the client technology. This could lead to real-world differences and limited technology choices, which in turn might lead you down the wrong technology path. In other words:

  • Do you get the same performance from JMeter versus the AMQ clients you would use in production? Are you comparing like for like? Apples with apples?

So, what do I think is the answer? Quiver [1]. In this article, I’ll provide an overview and demo of using Quiver with Red Hat AMQ on Red Hat OpenShift.  If you’re looking for more information on Red Hat AMQ and how it can help, check out this webinar.

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Red Hat AMQ 6.3 on OpenShift: Set up, connect SSL client, and configure logging

Red Hat AMQ 6.3 on OpenShift: Set up, connect SSL client, and configure logging

In this article, we will discuss how to set up Red Hat AMQ 6.3 on OpenShift. We will also set up an external Camel-based SSL client to connect to AMQ Broker, a pure-Java multiprotocol message broker.

By using the procedures in this article, you can easily set up the broker in your OpenShift environment and also set up a Camel-based client to quickly produce and consume messages. Also, you can change the log level to get verbose logs, thus getting a better understanding of the complete setup.

I recommend using a source-to-image (s2i) approach for deploying Red Hat AMQ 6.x on OpenShift, but if you do not use an s2i  approach, this article will help you to configure logging to get verbose logs.  Note that the Red Hat AMQ image used here is ephemeral; it doesn’t support persistence.

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Full integration to Salesforce with Red Hat Integration (Part 2)

Full integration to Salesforce with Red Hat Integration (Part 2)

This article is the second in a series of three articles about Red Hat Integration. The first article described how the new Red Hat Integration bundle allows citizen integrators to quickly provide an API through tools that make creating an API in five simple steps effortless, and we implemented a demo showing the full API lifecycle on Red Hat Integration. The demo was about providing wine labeling and ranking info via APIs.

In this article, I am going to take you further by implementing a real business transaction with Salesforce. We will create an event-driven integration solution with no code on Red Hat Integration.

The idea of this demo is to receive an order from the client web application through a gated, secured API that will then process the order and forward the needed data to the corresponding Salesforce modules. From there, Salesforce will take care of the order content.

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Announcing Kubernetes-native self-service messaging with Red Hat AMQ Online

Announcing Kubernetes-native self-service messaging with Red Hat AMQ Online

Microservices architecture is taking over software development discussions everywhere. More and more companies are adapting to develop microservices as the core of their new systems. However, when going beyond the “microservices 101” googled tutorial, required services communications become more and more complex. Scalable, distributed systems, container-native microservices, and serverless functions benefit from decoupled communications to access other dependent services. Asynchronous (non-blocking) direct or brokered interaction is usually referred to as messaging.

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How to configure a JDBC Appender for Red Hat Fuse 7 with Karaf

How to configure a JDBC Appender for Red Hat Fuse 7 with Karaf

For some integration projects it is helpful to persist application logs in a relational database instead of a plain log file. In this article, I show how to configure a JDBC appender for Red Hat Fuse 7 running in an Apache Karaf environment. There are instructions that describe how to persist messagess with PostgreSQL. Instead, I will show how to setup a JDBC appender for Oracle Database 11g.

I have tested this procedure with Oracle Database 11g Express Edition. A major difference I found is with the table syntax and the fact that the Oracle Database 11g sequence and trigger were required to auto-generate the primary key. Hence, users of Oracle Database 11g should find this article useful.

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How to integrate a remote Red Hat AMQ 7 cluster on Red Hat JBoss EAP 7

How to integrate a remote Red Hat AMQ 7 cluster on Red Hat JBoss EAP 7

It is very common in an integration landscape to have different components connected using a messaging system such as Red Hat AMQ 7 (RHAMQ 7). In this landscape, usually, there are JEE application servers, such as Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7 (JBoss EAP 7), to deploy and run applications connected to the messaging system.

This article describes in detail how to integrate a remote RHAMQ 7 cluster on a JBoss EAP 7 server, and it covers in detail the different configurations and components and some tips to improve your message-driven beans (MDBs) applications.

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How to run Kafka on Openshift, the enterprise Kubernetes, with AMQ Streams

How to run Kafka on Openshift, the enterprise Kubernetes, with AMQ Streams

On October 25th Red Hat announced the general availability of their AMQ Streams Kubernetes Operator for Apache Kafka. Red Hat AMQ Streams focuses on running Apache Kafka on Openshift providing a massively-scalable, distributed, and high performance data streaming platform. AMQ Streams, based on the Apache Kafka and Strimzi projects, offers a distributed backbone that allows microservices and other applications to share data with extremely high throughput. This backbone enables:

  • Publish and subscribe: Many to many dissemination in a fault tolerant, durable manner.
  • Replayable events: Serves as a repository for microservices to build in-memory copies of source data, up to any point in time.
  • Long-term data retention: Efficiently stores data for immediate access in a manner limited only by disk space.
  • Partition messages for more horizontal scalability: Allows for organizing messages to maximum concurrent access.

One of the most requested items from developers and architects is how to get started with a simple deployment option for testing purposes. In this guide we will use Red Hat Container Development Kit, based on minishift, to start an Apache Kafka cluster on Kubernetes.

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Logging incoming and outgoing messages for Red Hat AMQ 7

Logging incoming and outgoing messages for Red Hat AMQ 7

In this article, I will discuss how to capture incoming and outgoing messages for Red Hat AMQ 7 (RHAMQ 7). This might advantageous if you need to log the incoming or outgoing traffic, or the messages from a broker, or during development and/or testing when you want to see all message. Additionally, There may also be a need to modify messages in transit. Using RHAMQ 7 interceptors, you can intercept traffic to and from the RHAMQ 7 broker. You can also modify messages using the interceptor.

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