Integration

Modern business logic tooling workshop, lab 4: Create a process

Modern business logic tooling workshop, lab 4: Create a process

Since starting to update the free online rules and process automation workshops that showcase how to get started using modern business logic tooling, you’ve come a long way with process automation. The updates started with moving from JBoss BPM  to Red Hat Decision Manager and from JBoss BPM Suite to Red Hat Process Automation Manager.

In previous labs, we showed how to install Red Hat Decision Manager on your laptop, how to create a new project, and how to create a domain model. This article highlights the newest lab update for Red Hat Process Automation Manager, where you learn to design a process.

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Subsecond deployment and startup of Apache Camel applications

Subsecond deployment and startup of Apache Camel applications

The integration space is in constant change. Many open source projects and closed source technologies did not withstand the tests of time and have disappeared from the middleware stacks for good. After a decade, however, Apache Camel is still here and becoming even stronger for the next decade of integration. In this article, I’ll provide some history of Camel and then describe two changes coming to Apache Camel now (and later to Red Hat Fuse) and why they are important for developers. I call these changes subsecond deployment and subsecond startup of Camel applications.

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Self-service messaging with Red Hat AMQ Online and GitOps

Self-service messaging with Red Hat AMQ Online and GitOps

This article explores the service model of Red Hat AMQ Online 1.1 and how it maps to a GitOps workflow for different teams in your organization. For more information on new features in AMQ Online 1.1, see the release notes.

AMQ Online is an operator of stateful messaging services running on Red Hat OpenShift. AMQ Online is built around the principle that the responsibility of operating the messaging service is separate from the tenants consuming it. The operations team in can manage the messaging infrastructure, while the development teams provision messaging in a self-service manner, just as if they were using a public cloud service.

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Bringing IoT to Red Hat AMQ Online

Bringing IoT to Red Hat AMQ Online

Red Hat AMQ Online 1.1 was recently announced, and I am excited about it because it contains a tech preview of our Internet of Things (IoT) support. AMQ Online is the “messaging as service solution” from Red Hat AMQ. Leveraging the work we did on Eclipse Hono allows us to integrate a scalable, cloud-native IoT personality into this general-purpose messaging layer. And the whole reason why you need an IoT messaging layer is so you can focus on connecting your cloud-side application with the millions of devices that you have out there.

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Automated migration from JBoss AMQ 6 to Red Hat AMQ 7 on Red Hat OpenShift

Automated migration from JBoss AMQ 6 to Red Hat AMQ 7 on Red Hat OpenShift

Since Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform was first released, Red Hat Middleware products were provided to deploy on it and help developers to build more complex solutions. Messaging Brokers are a very important piece in most new application architectures, such as microservices, event sourcing, and CQRS. Red Hat JBoss AMQ was provided from the beginning to deploy Messaging Brokers on Red Hat OpenShift easily.

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Manage your APIs deployed with Istio service mesh

Manage your APIs deployed with Istio service mesh

With the rise of microservices architectures, companies are looking for a way to connect, secure, control, and observe their microservices. Currently, a service mesh such as Istio is the best option to reach this goal.

  • Connect: Istio can intelligently control the flow of traffic between services, conduct a range of tests and upgrade gradually with blue/green deployments.
  • Secure: Automatically secure your services through managed authentication, authorization, and encryption of communication between services.
  • Control: Apply policies and ensure that they are enforced and that resources are fairly distributed among consumers.
  • Observe: See what’s happening with rich automatic tracing, monitoring, logging of all your services.

And, as explained in “Distributed microservices architecture: Istio, managed API gateways and, enterprise integration”, a service mesh does not relieve the need for an API management solution. A service mesh manages services and the connections between them, whereas an API management solution manages APIs and their consumers. In this article, I’ll describe how to manage APIs using the Red Hat Integration adapter for Istio.

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Optimizing Red Hat Fuse 7 Spring Boot container images

Optimizing Red Hat Fuse 7 Spring Boot container images

Working with Red Hat Fuse 7 on Spring Boot is straightforward. In my field experience, I have seen many development (a.k.a. integrator) teams moving to Fuse 7 on Spring Boot for their new integration platforms on Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform (well aligned with agile integration).

Lately, however, I have also seen some teams worried about the size of the final images and the deployment pipeline. In most cases, they had developed a set of common libraries or frameworks to extend or to homogenize the final integration projects. All the cases have the same result:

  • Several dependencies copied in each integration project
  • Always replacing the container images with the latest fat JAR (including the same dependencies) in each build pipeline

Spring Boot is usually packaged as “fat JARS” that contain all runtime dependencies. Although this is quite convenient, because you only need a JRE and a single JAR to run the application, in a container environment such as Red Hat OpenShift, you have to build a full container image to deploy your application.

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Using Quiver with AMQ on Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform

Using Quiver with AMQ on Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform

As part of the Red Hat UKI Professional Services team, I have worked with several customers who are implementing AMQ Broker on Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform (OCP). One question customers typically ask is, “How do we validate that the AMQ configuration is correct for our scenario?” Previously, I would have suggested one of the following:

These tools can give you indicators around:

  • Is the broker up and running? That is, can it receive/publish messages for this configuration?
  • Can the broker handle a certain performance characteristic? That is, what is my minimum publish rate per second for this configuration?
  • And much more.

The problem with these tools is that you cannot choose the client technology. This could lead to real-world differences and limited technology choices, which in turn might lead you down the wrong technology path. In other words:

  • Do you get the same performance from JMeter versus the AMQ clients you would use in production? Are you comparing like for like? Apples with apples?

So, what do I think is the answer? Quiver [1]. In this article, I’ll provide an overview and demo of using Quiver with Red Hat AMQ on Red Hat OpenShift.  If you’re looking for more information on Red Hat AMQ and how it can help, check out this webinar.

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Modern business logic tooling workshop, lab 3: Create a domain model

Modern business logic tooling workshop, lab 3: Create a domain model

Since starting to update my free online rules and process automation workshops that showcase how to get started using modern business logic tooling, we’ve come a long way with process automation. The updates started with moving from JBoss BPM to Red Hat Decision Manager and from JBoss BPM Suite to Red Hat Process Automation Manager.

The first lab update showed how to install Red Hat Decision Manager on your laptop, and the second lab showed how to create a new project.  This article highlights the newest lab update for Red Hat Process Automation Manager, where you’ll learn how to create a domain model.

Let’s take a look at the lab, shall we?

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