Looking for DevNation 2017 CFP

You may have seen (or maybe missed) that in 2017, DevNation will be folded into Red Hat Summit 2017.

The CFP deadline has been pushed back to December 16, so I look forward to seeing your submissions for application development!

Speakers:  submit your Application Development proposals today!
  1. Submit your proposal on the Summit CFP site [1] and tag it with the primary theme of Application Development.
  2. We’re interested in advanced technical topics of all developer-related topics, but especially looking for sessions on: Microservices, MicroProfile, Containers, .NET, modern coding practices, CI/CD, DevOps, cloud/OpenShift, Mobile, Eclipse / Che, IoT, Node.js / Javascript, Software Collections, C++, performance tools, etc.
  3. Got a developer topic that’s not listed in item 2?  Submit it.

[1] Submit your proposals at redhat.com/summit and check out the guide at http://redhat.slides.com/events/2017-red-hat-summit-submission-guide#/

 


Join Red Hat Developers, a developer program for you to learn, share, and code faster – and get access to Red Hat software for your development.  The developer program and software are both free!

 


More about DevNation:  DevNation 2014 was our inaugural open source, polyglot conference for application developers and maintainers. View some of the DevNation 2015 session recordings here.  DevNation 2016 will be in San Francisco, USA, the week of June 26.  Be sure to follow its status and register at www.devnation.org.

Red Hat Summit, DevNation, and an Application Development call for papers

Red Hat Summit has always catered to multiple user roles and this year will be no different.  What will be different in 2017 is an expanded focus on professional application developers much like DevNation has done in recent years.  As such, we will not be hosting a separate DevNation event alongside Summit 2017. Instead, Summit will include more advanced Application Development sessions, CodeStarters, labs, birds of a feathers, a new “Developer Zone” in the expo area, and much more.
What does this mean for you?
  • Attendees:  Every attendee can now access everything that’s developer-related and at no extra cost.
  • Speakers:  You now have a larger audience to share your application development story, plus you and co-presenters get access to the entire Summit event.
Speakers:  submit your Application Development proposals today!

Continue reading “Red Hat Summit, DevNation, and an Application Development call for papers”


Join Red Hat Developers, a developer program for you to learn, share, and code faster – and get access to Red Hat software for your development.  The developer program and software are both free!

 


More about DevNation:  DevNation 2014 was our inaugural open source, polyglot conference for application developers and maintainers. View some of the DevNation 2015 session recordings here.  DevNation 2016 will be in San Francisco, USA, the week of June 26.  Be sure to follow its status and register at www.devnation.org.

A week of hacking the Java Language Server

As you may recall, Red Hat recently announced support for a common language server protocol. Furthermore, we demoed our initial implementation for a Java language server during the DevNation keynote. I posted an earlier blog covering these topics, and I would like to do an update in this post on the progress we’ve made since DevNation.

While preparing for DevNation, we had the idea that it would be a good feature boost if  the engineering teams from Red Hat, Microsoft and CodeEny come together on a hackathon. Later, the participant list was extended to include engineers from IBM.

Microsoft’s Visual Studio Code team hosted the hackathon in their Zurich location. The collective engineering team, which is probably a recruiter’s dream of engineering talent, started working on issues around the Java language server.

I will not go into the details of individual issues worked on but as this is a true open source effort and you can check out the project yourself to find out about them. Instead, here is a screen cast of the hackathon release of the Java language server together with with Visual Studio Code. You can also download the VS Code extension (.vsix) and install and try the release yourself.

As a bonus, Java language server was also integrated to the Eclipse Orion project, demonstrating the effectiveness of a common protocol for providing language features on different editors.

Stay tuned for more updates as we continue to make progress and develop new web-IDE features and functionality!


Join Red Hat Developers, a developer program for you to learn, share, and code faster – and get access to Red Hat software for your development.  The developer program and software are both free!

 


More about DevNation:  DevNation 2014 was our inaugural open source, polyglot conference for application developers and maintainers. View some of the DevNation 2015 session recordings here.  DevNation 2016 will be in San Francisco, USA, the week of June 26.  Be sure to follow its status and register at www.devnation.org.

Help, I accidentally hit CTRL-ALT-F8 on my Red Hat Enterprise LInux VM on Hyper-V!

Last week, I attended a DevNation talk, “Getting Started with C# on Red Hat Enterprise Linux and OpenShift”, given by Scott Hunter from Microsoft. The first thing Scott asked was, “Does anyone know how to recover from hitting CTRL-ALT-F8 in Red Hat Enterprise Linux?”

Apparently, an hour or two before his presentation, Scott accidentally hit that key sequence while trying to use a keyboard shortcut for Hyper-V which was running his Red Hat Enterprise Linux VM on his Microsoft Surface convertible. That key sequence resulted in an unresponsive blank screen with a blinking cursor that he couldn’t figure out how to recover from.

Of course this gave Scott a mini heart attack given his imminent presentation that was to include a live demo. If you’ve been around Linux long enough, you probably know that this is a feature called Linux Virtual Consoles. I’ll explain that in a bit. But the point of is we are in new world where we’ve got a lot of developers who are new to Linux.

So the question is how to give developers who aren’t system administrators, concise easily accessible Linux know-how so they can get their jobs done? If you’ve been following developers.redhat.com, you may have noticed a few answers to that question:

Getting answers to your questions

  • Developer focused Get Started guides for Red Hat products — these are short how-to style documents with the goal of getting you to the point where you can start developing as quickly as possible.
  • Stack Overflow for Red Hat products — by using the appropriate tag, you can get answers to your questions directly on Stack Overflow. The selected tags match Red Hat product names, which enables Red Hat engineers to find your questions.
  • Red Hat Developer Forums — recently, the popular JBoss.org forums have extended to cover all of the Red Hat products that are of interest to developers. You will find discussions on containers, developer tools such as software collections, and .Net for Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

Linux Virtual Consoles

The answer to Scott’s problem is to hit CTRL-ALT-F1 to go back to the virtual console where his desktop was running. Since the early days of Linux, there has been support for multiple virtual consoles that you can get to by hitting CTRL-ALT-Fn. Each of these is like having an additional virtual display and keyboard attached to your system. Most users only ever see the first console. If you are running a graphical desktop, it will be on the first virtual console. If you hit CTRL-ALT-F2, you’ll get a text-based login prompt. You could log in there, and start another, different graphical desktop. You could then flip back and forth between the two. On Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7, virtual console 2 through 6 are configured for text based logins. By default there is nothing running on virtual console 7 through 12, which is why Scott saw only a blinking cursor.

Multiple virtual consoles exist because in many cases they can be a real help if something goes wrong with your desktop, such as a misconfigured video driver, making your screen unreadable. This feature was used heavily by those developing components such as the X window server, desktops such as GNOME, or even the Red Hat installer Anaconda. When you are installing Red Hat Enterprise Linux, you will normally only see the installer screen. However, if something goes wrong, you can flip through the virtual consoles to see the logs, or get a text based shell that can be used for installing other drivers, fixing configuration problems, or capturing diagnostic info to send to Red Hat.

If you are running in a VM today, you probably won’t have a need to use Linux Virtual Consoles. Hopefully now you will know how to recover if you accidentally switch to the wrong console. I was able to explain this to Scott after his talk.

So what questions do you have about developing on Red Hat Enterprise Linux?   See you on Stack Overflow or in the forums.


Join Red Hat Developers, a developer program for you to learn, share, and code faster – and get access to Red Hat software for your development.  The developer program and software are both free!

 


More about DevNation:  DevNation 2014 was our inaugural open source, polyglot conference for application developers and maintainers. View some of the DevNation 2015 session recordings here.  DevNation 2016 will be in San Francisco, USA, the week of June 26.  Be sure to follow its status and register at www.devnation.org.

Seven must try user experience tactics for developers

Users have higher expectations than ever from applications. Your website or application has only 10 seconds to make a good impression, and only 20 min to help your users achieve a goal where they feel successful.

How many of you are developers? (99% are developers in DevNation 2016 audience) How many of you have worked with a UX designer? (40% have worked with a UX designer). Regardless of whether you have a designer or not, you are responsible either alone or as part of the team for making your user experience excellent.

Learning UX will make you a better developer, and make sure that you spend your development effort in the areas that have the biggest impact on your users. Here are seven tactics you can try on your applications to not only meet, but exceed your users’ expectations.

Continue reading “Seven must try user experience tactics for developers”


Join Red Hat Developers, a developer program for you to learn, share, and code faster – and get access to Red Hat software for your development.  The developer program and software are both free!

 


More about DevNation:  DevNation 2014 was our inaugural open source, polyglot conference for application developers and maintainers. View some of the DevNation 2015 session recordings here.  DevNation 2016 will be in San Francisco, USA, the week of June 26.  Be sure to follow its status and register at www.devnation.org.

DevNation Live Blog: fabric8-ing Continous Improvement with Kubernetes and Jenkins Pipeline

I’m sure you have heard and read a lot about microservices in the recent past  and how they are here to defend our end users from the horrible monolith. Breaking an application up into many components is a great start, but to take your organization to the next level requires a platform focused on integrating microservices into your continuous improvement process. Red Hat’s James Rawlings & James Strachan led us through achieving our new goal of continuous delivery with containerized microservices. The way to go fast while developing is ensuring that all microservices have their own release cycle. Splitting your team up to align with your microservices will allow faster changes, the ultimate goal. In order to take advantage of many rapid releases your deployment and testing processes must be automated. Automating your build process and creating continuous feedback loops is the way to go.

IMG_6235

Fabric8 enables you to create microservices, build immutable containers, perform rolling upgrades across runtime environments. Your services gain capabilities for service discovery and scaling, management and feedback. As a platform, it will automate many of the tasks your team is performing today like connecting Jenkins to your Git repository and deploying the new build to a testing environment.

The other presenter, also named James, then took the stage and walked us through a great demo showing Fabric8 running on the Google Compute Engine. Using the kubectl tool James connected the  GCE cluster directly to his Kubernetes cluster. Using a few simple command he created and deployed the Fabric8 components, and was editing, building, and deploying a Java application (using Camel!) in no time. Monitoring came out of the box with Kibana for visualizing log events across pods. Fabric8 will even help coordinate a rolling upgrade of a new version of the application.

Then we got a detailed overview of the three big underlying components powering Fabric8; Docker, Kubernetes, and Jenkins. There are several features Fabric8 adds on top of these three giants like re-usable pipelines to make the platform work for you. Fabric8 makes use of many other services such as: ElasticSearch for storing logs, Kibana for viewing those logs, Prometheus for service monitoring and metrics with a Grafana frontend. Having the logs is great, but Fabric8 builds on top of that by using Zipkin for fine-grained tracing between microservices.

I’m looking forward to hearing more from the Fabric8 team about continuing to provide a platform for microservices.


Join Red Hat Developers, a developer program for you to learn, share, and code faster – and get access to Red Hat software for your development.  The developer program and software are both free!

 


More about DevNation:  DevNation 2014 was our inaugural open source, polyglot conference for application developers and maintainers. View some of the DevNation 2015 session recordings here.  DevNation 2016 will be in San Francisco, USA, the week of June 26.  Be sure to follow its status and register at www.devnation.org.

Summit Live Blog: Middleware security: Authentication, authorization, and auditing services

As you would expect, security is a key focus for Red Hat.  Secure by default is more than a goal, it is a guiding principle across all product lines.  Middleware is no exception and there are some amazing things going on in this space. Divya Mehra and Vikas Kumar of Red Hat walked us through some of the recent innovations, including the recently released Red Hat SSO, product built upon KeyCloak. Derek Walker of SWIFT also spoke about how the leading financial system message broker relies upon JBoss Fuse for secure messaging.

IMG_6237

Security is one of the most important topics in computing today, it can be separated into three key pillars and further mapped into middleware features:

  • Confidentiality
    • Authentication
    • Authorization
  • Integrity
    • Audit logging
    • non-repudiation
  • Availability
    • Clustering
    • Guaranteed Delivery

In short, Red Hat JBoss Middleware is secure and open source throughout the entire product line, giving customers increased assurances, such as:

  • Known, fully open source components
    • built securely from source
  • Proactive security notifications and fixes
  • Standards-based
    • OpenJDK
    • SAML 2.0, Kerberos, OpenID Connect
    • TLS, WS-security

Red Hat SSO is the newest member of this product line, providing a brand new server for complete identity management federation:

  • SAML 2.0
  • OpenID Connect
  • OAuth 2.0

It also comes with client adapters, allowing customers to easily integrate their applications with Red Hat SSO or other standard-compliant identity provider.

Red Hat SSO server is a complete, stand-alone product and is Red Hat’s solution for web-based federation.  It can interface with Red Hat Identity Management (IdM) for integration with internal corporate identity management.  It can also work with Active Directory and plain LDAP.  There is native OpenStack and OpenShift integration with Red Hat SSO coming down the line as well.

Continue reading “Summit Live Blog: Middleware security: Authentication, authorization, and auditing services”


Join Red Hat Developers, a developer program for you to learn, share, and code faster – and get access to Red Hat software for your development.  The developer program and software are both free!

 


More about DevNation:  DevNation 2014 was our inaugural open source, polyglot conference for application developers and maintainers. View some of the DevNation 2015 session recordings here.  DevNation 2016 will be in San Francisco, USA, the week of June 26.  Be sure to follow its status and register at www.devnation.org.


Download and learn more about Red Hat JBoss Fuse, an innovative modular, cloud-ready architecture, powerful management and automation, and world class developer productivity. It is Java™ EE 7 certified and features powerful, enterprise-grade features such as high availability clustering, distributed caching, messaging, transactions, and a full web services stack.

DevNation Blog: End-to-end OpenSCAP for automated compliance

OpenSCAP is a security framework for determining the compliance of a system to some defined set of standards. Jeffrey Blank of the National Security Agency and Shawn Wells of Red Hat gave their talk on automated compliance.

IMG_6235

We, as an industry, needed standardized formats for automated checklists. Specifically, we needed:

  • Standardized inputs
  • Standardized outputs
  • Provide product independence

SCAP is the standard and its checklist language is called XCCDF.  Check instructions are detailed in OVAL or OCIL languages, which are open standards.  Enumerations are defined in CCE, CPE and CVE, basically providing a way of providing identifiers for particular things (vulnerabilities, etc). Risk is detailed in the CVSS framework.  You can read more about these on the SCAP website.

The US Government provides NIST FIPS 140 and NIAP Common Criteria evaluation programs.  Common Criteria looks at source code and performing testing to verify that a vendor’s claim actually matches implementation.  FIPS is validation of security modules.  The protection profiles are developed and kept on GitHub.  SCAP is the US Federal standard to perform security automation to ensure compliance with these profiles and programs.  Basically, SCAP provides a mechanism to query a system to make sure it is compliant with everything which applies to that system.

Red Hat has open sourced and released the SCAP Security Guide, which provides baseline standards for compliance.  Shawn calls them “nerd nobs”, which is just awesome. Security baseline updates are included as part of RHEL minor releases (7.2, 7.3, etc).  Red Hat is shipping the following SCAP profiles:

  • RHEL 7.2
    • PCI-DSS
    • RHEL7 Vendor STIG
  • RHEL 7.3
    • FBI CJIS
    • CIA’s C2S
    • Certified Cloud Provider
    • FISMA Moderate

Shawn then went on show a live demo, which can be viewed as part of the course content.  OpenSCAP is something that sounds extremely dry, but can be very valuable for your organization.  If you have ever had the pleasure of sitting through security, PCI and/or SOX audits, you’ll understand how having OpenSCAP enabled in your organization can save you from a lot of pain. If you have not experienced this joy, just do it for your InfoSec team, they will love you.

 

About the Author

Brian J. Atkisson is a Senior Principal Systems Engineer and the technical lead on the Red Hat IT Identity and Access Management team.  He has 18 years of experience as a Systems Administrator and Systems Engineer, focusing on identity management, virtualization, systems integration, and automation solutions. He is a Red Hat Certified Architect and Engineer, in addition to his academic background in Biochemistry, Microbiology and Philosophy.

 


Join Red Hat Developers, a developer program for you to learn, share, and code faster – and get access to Red Hat software for your development.  The developer program and software are both free!

 


More about DevNation:  DevNation 2014 was our inaugural open source, polyglot conference for application developers and maintainers. View some of the DevNation 2015 session recordings here.  DevNation 2016 will be in San Francisco, USA, the week of June 26.  Be sure to follow its status and register at www.devnation.org.

DevNation Live Blog: Drools 7.X Happenings and Roadmap

Drools is an open source rules expert engine and today the Drools co-founder and platform architect Mark Proctor from Red Hat gave an overview of the future of the KIE (Knowledge Is Everyhting) family. I’ll cover only a subset of what Mark covered, be sure to check out his slide deck for more details.

IMG_20160629_102117

UI and UX

With the recent addition of a dedicated User Experience and Design (UXD) team and full adoption of PatternFly for consistent and polished theming the UI is looking better than ever. The UXD team has been working on creating personas for different use cases ranging from  developers to project managers. The latest release will be targeting GWT 2.8 which will continue to bring outstanding efficiency in designing the frontend to the primarily Java based team. The Errai framework built on top of GWT brings extended benefits to the ecosystem rounding out some of GWT’s rough edges. Uberfire will continue to be used and enhanced to provide perspectives, screens, page composition, security, permissions and more on top of Errai to help Business Central provide a rich user interface and experience.

Bootstrap grid views for building custom forms brings responsiveness and consistent styling to your task forms. This allows for stylized user interfaces to be developed and maintained within the system and used for process and rule interaction.

Deployment

In the upcoming release of Drools you will be able to deploy applications directly to target environments such as OpenShift and WildFly. This allows your application with minimal code, which can now be comprised of just some Data Models and forms, to run directly on OpenShift or WildFly with no extra configuration! KIE will create all the glue code and use your custom forms to create and deploy a webapp. Look to more automatic application generation features coming in the future.

Engine Enhancments

The engine enhancement that Mark covered are numerous and broad in coverage, I won’t try to enumerate them all here. Two that stood out to me are the aggregate decision tables and thread safety updates. A new decision table editing UI has been created that will infinitely scale and can even compose decision tables to represent more complex rules than ever before.

IMG_20160629_104719

In previous versions of Drools, there existed a lot of synchronization code in many places and behavior was unreliable. To address this the team has re-factored the main engine and introduced a state machine at its core. This allowed one point of synchronization (a propagation queue) which simplifies the design and even added some performance benefits.

IMG_20160629_110103

Continue reading “DevNation Live Blog: Drools 7.X Happenings and Roadmap”


Join Red Hat Developers, a developer program for you to learn, share, and code faster – and get access to Red Hat software for your development.  The developer program and software are both free!

 


More about DevNation:  DevNation 2014 was our inaugural open source, polyglot conference for application developers and maintainers. View some of the DevNation 2015 session recordings here.  DevNation 2016 will be in San Francisco, USA, the week of June 26.  Be sure to follow its status and register at www.devnation.org.

DevNation Live Blog: Meet the assertable Chaos Monkeys for your Docker system

The production system has been targeted by troublesome random failures over a long period of time, and countless hours of debugging has yielded no valuable results. We’re close to throwing in the towel. An army of Chaos Monkeys has been deployed in an attempt to force the issue, but no solution is in sight. We need to take back control. It’s time to meet the assertable Chaos Monkey, Arquillian Cube Q. Arquilian Cube Q is an extension that gives you full control over a production-like system right from the comfort of your IDE. In this session, we’ll explore some of the things you can do when you have control over the whole system. We’ll validate scalability and connectivity, assert the failure state, enforce service responses, and more.

Aslak Knutsen, Senior Software Engineer, Red Hat
Bartosz Majsak, Atos Consulting Switzerland

Software is Eating the World

Everywhere you turn, software is running: your TV, your toaster, your car.  All of these systems, even the ones upon which your life depends, have bugs.  Recently, a French airport was shutdown due to a weather bug running on Windows 3.1 (note I said recently).  Solving bugs has always been a component, if not one of the primary purposes, of software development since day one.  Unit testing is one method of bug hunting, often using mock builds. While better than nothing, these are not really sufficient and have many disadvantages.  One major disadvantage being you still don’t know if it’ll work in production, much less know if it’ll work well in production.

High-Level tests running in production-like environments

Arquillian is a “middleware for your tests” framework.  It tries to removes lot of complexities and boring parts of automated tests.  Arquillian allows you to run these unit tests from within your IDE.  After defining the dependencies, you can generate unit tests quickly and easily using this framework.  It also knows about where you are running your code, allowing for run-time integration and feedback.  The main principles of Arquillian are:

  • Portable tests
  • Executable from IDE and build tools
  • Reuse existing frameworks
  • flexibility to adapt to new technologies

Arquillian Cube

Arquillian Cube is an extension that deals with containers, specifically Docker containers.  It supports managing the life-cycle of containers, even providing testing integration within the immutable container.  Additionally, it also has a basic level of orchestration, allowing full-stack testing, all within the IDE.  This Docker integration takes you down the path of production quality assurance, well beyond simple unit tests.

Arquillian Cube Q

The Cube Q extension intercepts and changes the Arquillian Cube Docker compose command to interject Toxic Proxies, where they would not otherwise exist.  This includes changing network conditions, such as increased latency, decreased bandwidth, packet loss, etc).  Doing so allows you to simulate how your code responds during periods of service or network degradation and build tests around these conditions.  Despite the fact that nothing on the Internet is ever considered to be down, modern applications must take into account many failure conditions.  Cube Q gives you a great mechanism for these tests.

The combination of Arquillian Cube and Arquillian Cube Q provide a new and interesting method for testing your code base.  These projects give you the tools you need to squash bugs well before you hit production.  With any hope, your toaster will treat you better because of these and similar tools 🙂

 

 

About the Author

Brian J. Atkisson is a Senior Principal Systems Engineer and the technical lead on the Red Hat IT Identity and Access Management team.  He has 18 years of experience as a Systems Administrator and Systems Engineer, focusing on identity management, virtualization, systems integration, and automation solutions. He is a Red Hat Certified Architect and Engineer, in addition to his academic background in Biochemistry, Microbiology and Philosophy.

 


Join Red Hat Developers, a developer program for you to learn, share, and code faster – and get access to Red Hat software for your development.  The developer program and software are both free!

 


More about DevNation:  DevNation 2014 was our inaugural open source, polyglot conference for application developers and maintainers. View some of the DevNation 2015 session recordings here.  DevNation 2016 will be in San Francisco, USA, the week of June 26.  Be sure to follow its status and register at www.devnation.org.