Red Hat Developer Toolset

How to secure microservices with Red Hat Single Sign-On, Fuse, and 3scale

How to secure microservices with Red Hat Single Sign-On, Fuse, and 3scale

In this article, we’ll cover microservice security concepts by using protocols such as OpenID Connect with the support of Red Hat Single Sign-On and 3scale. Working with a microservice-based architecture, user identity, and access control in a distributed, in-depth form must be carefully designed. Here, the integration of these tools will be detailed, step-by-step, in a realistic view.

This article exemplifies the use of tools that can securely run your businesses, avoiding using homemade solutions, and protecting your services by using an API gateway, preventing your applications from being exposed to the public network. The use of an API gateway also provides additional access control, monetization, and analytics.

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Introducing debuginfod, the elfutils debuginfo server

Introducing debuginfod, the elfutils debuginfo server

Because bugs are inevitable, developers need quick and easy access to the artifacts that debugging tools like Systemtap and GDB depend on, which are typically DWARF (Debugging With Attributed Record Formats) debuginfo or source files. Accessing these resources should not be an issue when debugging your own local build tree, but all too often they are not readily available.

For example, your distro might package debuginfo and source files separately from the executable you’re trying to debug and you may lack the permissions to install these packages. Or, perhaps you’re debugging within a container that was not built with these resources, or maybe you simply don’t want these files taking up space on your machine.

Debuginfo files are notorious for taking up large amounts of space, and it is not unusual for their size to be five to fifteen times that of the corresponding executable. debuginfod aims to resolve these problems.

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Developer Toolset 8.1 and GCC 8.3 now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux  7

Developer Toolset 8.1 and GCC 8.3 now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7

Red Hat Developer Toolset delivers GCC, GDB, and a set of complementary development tools for Red Hat Enterprise Linux via two release trains per year. We are pleased to share that Developer Toolset 8.1 with GCC 8.3 is now available and supported on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.

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Red Hat Developer Toolset 8.1 Beta now available

Red Hat Developer Toolset 8.1 Beta now available

Red Hat Developer Toolset augments Red Hat Enterprise Linux with the latest, stable versions of GCC that install alongside the original base version. This version of Red Hat Developer Toolset 8.1 Beta includes the following new components:

  • GCC 8.2.1
  • GDB 8.2
  • binutils 2.30
  • elfutils 0.176
  • Valgrind 3.14.0

This Beta release is supported on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 for AMD64 and Intel 64 architectures. It also supports the following architectures on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7:  64-bit ARM, big- and little-endian variants of IBM POWER (), and IBM Z. See below for more information about each updated component.

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Red Hat Enterprise Linux compiler toolset updates: Clang/LLVM 7.0, Go 1.11, Rust 1.31

Red Hat Enterprise Linux compiler toolset updates: Clang/LLVM 7.0, Go 1.11, Rust 1.31

We are pleased to announce the general availability of these three compiler toolsets for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7:

  • Clang/LLVM 7.0
  • Go 1.11
  • Rust 1.31

These toolsets can be installed from the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Devtools channel. See the “Compiler toolset details” section of this article to learn about the new features.

These toolsets became officially supported Red Hat offerings as of the previous release.

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Understanding GCC warnings, Part 2

Understanding GCC warnings, Part 2

In part 1, I shed light on trade-offs involved in the GCC implementation choices for various types of front-end warnings, such as preprocessor warnings, lexical warnings, type-safety warnings, and other warnings.

As useful as front-end warnings are, those based on the flow of control or data through the program have rather inconvenient limitations. To overcome them, flow-based warnings have increasingly been implemented in what GCC calls the “middle end.” Middle-end warnings are the focus of this article.

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Understanding GCC warnings

Understanding GCC warnings

Most of us appreciate when our compiler lets us know we made a mistake. Finding coding errors early lets us correct them before they embarrass us in a code review or, worse, turn into bugs that impact our customers. Besides the compulsory errors, many projects enable additional diagnostics by using the -Wall and -Wextra command-line options. For this reason, some projects even turn them into errors via -Werror as their first line of defense. But not every instance of a warning necessarily means the code is buggy. Conversely, the absence of warnings for a piece of code is no guarantee that there are no bugs lurking in it.

In this article, I would like to shed more light on trade-offs involved in the GCC implementation choices. Besides illuminating underlying issues for GCC contributors interested in implementing new warnings or improving existing ones, I hope it will help calibrate expectations for GCC users about what kinds of problems can be expected to be detected and with what efficacy. Having a better understanding of the challenges should also reduce the frustration the limitations of the available solutions can sometimes cause. (See part 2 to learn more about middle-end warnings.)

The article isn’t specific to any GCC version, but some command-line options it refers to are more recent than others. Most are in GCC 4 that ships with Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), but some are as recent as GCC 7. The output of the compiler shown in the examples may vary between GCC versions. See How to install GCC 8 on RHEL if you’d like to use the latest GCC.

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How to install GCC 8 and Clang/LLVM 6 on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7

How to install GCC 8 and Clang/LLVM 6 on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7

There has been a lot of work to improve C/C++ compilers in recent years. A number of articles have been posted by Red Hat engineers working on the compilers themselves covering usability improvements, features to detect possible bugs, and security issues in your code.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Beta ships with GCC 8 as the default compiler. This article shows you how to install GCC 8 as well as Clang/LLVM 6 on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. You’ll be able to use the same updated (and supported) compilers from Red Hat on both RHEL 7 and 8.

If you want your default gcc to always be GCC 8, or you want clang to always be in your path, this article shows how to permanently enable a software collection by adding it to the profile (dot files) for your user account. A number of common questions about software collections are also answered.

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