Developer Tools

Installing Red Hat’s migration toolkit for applications on your laptop

Installing Red Hat’s migration toolkit for applications on your laptop

If you are a developer considering modernizing your Java applications by containerizing or migrating them to a more modern application server, then you are likely aware of Red Hat’s migration toolkit for applications. This article helps you get started with migration toolkit for applications by installing it directly on your laptop. For more about the toolkit, see:

Note: Red Hat’s migration toolkit for applications (formerly Red Hat Application Migration Toolkit) is based on the upstream, open source Windup project. Check out the code and see how it works!

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Support for IBM Power Systems and more with Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2.5

Support for IBM Power Systems and more with Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2.5

Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2.5 is now available. This article introduces support for IBM Power Systems and the new single-host mode in CodeReady Workspaces 2.5. We also briefly discuss support for Red Hat OpenShift 4.6 and language updates in this release.

Note: CodeReady Workspaces 2.5 is available on Red Hat OpenShift 3.11 and Red Hat OpenShift 4.5 and higher.

About CodeReady Workspaces

CodeReady Workspaces (CRW) is based on Eclipse Che, an open source project. CodeReady Workspaces significantly improves developer productivity with near-instant onboarding and consistent, production-like development environments. Developers can use CodeReady Workspaces for cloud-native development on Red Hat OpenShift and other types of development.

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vscode-xml 0.14.0: A more customizable XML extension for VS Code

vscode-xml 0.14.0: A more customizable XML extension for VS Code

Red Hat’s XML extension for Visual Studio Code (VS Code) has improved significantly since the last release. This article is an overview of the most notable updates in the vscode-xml extension 0.14.0 release. Improvements include embedded settings documentation, customizable document outlines, links for seamless XML catalog navigation, and error aggregation for schema validation.

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New features in Red Hat CodeReady Studio 12.17 GA and JBoss Tools 4.17.0 Final for Eclipse 2020-09

New features in Red Hat CodeReady Studio 12.17 GA and JBoss Tools 4.17.0 Final for Eclipse 2020-09

JBoss Tools 4.17.0 and Red Hat CodeReady Studio 12.17 for Eclipse 4.17 (2020-09) are now available. For this release, we focused on improving Quarkus and container-based development and fixing bugs. We also updated the Hibernate Tools runtime provider and Java Developer Tools (JDT) extensions, which are now compatible with Java 15. Additionally, we made many changes to platform views, dialogs, and toolbars in the user interface (UI).

Keep reading for an overview of what’s new in JBoss Tools 4.17.0 and CodeReady Studio 12.17 for Eclipse 4.17 (2020-09).

Installation

First, let’s look at how to install these updates. CodeReady Studio (previously Red Hat Developer Studio) comes with everything pre-bundled in its installer. Download the installer from the Red Hat CodeReady Studio product page and run it as follows:

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Open Liberty 20.0.0.11 brings Kerberos authentication and Thanos support in Grafana dashboards

Open Liberty 20.0.0.11 brings Kerberos authentication and Thanos support in Grafana dashboards

This article is a quick look at two exciting updates in the new Open Liberty 20.0.0.11 release. First, you can now use the Kerberos authentication protocol to secure Java Database Connectivity (JDBC) data sources. I’ll introduce the new kerberos configuration element in Open Liberty’s server.xml and show you how to use the Kerberos protocol to secure a data source.

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Using Microsoft SQL Server on Red Hat OpenShift

Using Microsoft SQL Server on Red Hat OpenShift

In this article, you’ll learn how to deploy Microsoft SQL Server 2019 on Red Hat OpenShift. We’ll then use SQL Server from an ASP.NET Core application that is also deployed on OpenShift. Next, I’ll show you how to connect to SQL Server while working on the application from your local development machine. And finally, we’ll connect to the server using Azure Data Studio.

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Migrating from Fabric8 Maven Plugin to Eclipse JKube 1.0.0

Migrating from Fabric8 Maven Plugin to Eclipse JKube 1.0.0

The recent release of Eclipse JKube 1.0.0 means that the Fabric8 Maven Plugin is no longer supported. If you are currently using the Fabric8 Maven Plugin, this article provides instructions for migrating to JKube instead. I will also explain the relationship between Eclipse JKube and the Fabric8 Maven Plugin (they’re the same thing) and introduce the highlights of the new Eclipse JKube 1.0.0 release. These migration instructions are for developers working on the Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift platforms.

Eclipse JKube is the Fabric8 Maven Plugin

Eclipse JKube and the Fabric8 Maven Plugin are one and the same. Eclipse JKube was first released in 2014 under the name of Fabric8 Maven Plugin. The development team changed the name when we pre-released Eclipse JKube 0.1.0 in December 2019. For more about the name change, see my recent introduction to Eclipse JKube. This article focuses on the migration path to JKube 1.0.0.

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How to run Red Hat CodeReady Containers on Windows 10 Enterprise

How to run Red Hat CodeReady Containers on Windows 10 Enterprise

Red Hat CodeReady Containers allows you to spin up a small Red Hat OpenShift cluster on your local PC, without the need for a server, a cloud, or a team of operations people. For developers who want to get started immediately with cloud-native development, containers, and Kubernetes (as well as OpenShift), it’s a simple and slick tool. It runs on macOS, Linux, and all versions of Windows 10.

Except for Windows 10 Enterprise.

Which I painfully learned.

Because I lazily didn’t pay attention to the documentation.

OK, so I’m the only developer who glosses over documentation. Fortunately for you, I struggled and managed to get CRC running on my Windows 10 Enterprise notebook computer, and this article explains what is involved to get it working. So, in a sense, you’re welcome that I’m lazy.

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