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June 2018 ISO C++ Meeting Trip Report (Core Language)

The Summer 2018 ISO C++ standards committee meeting this year was back in Rapperswil, Switzerland. The new features for C++2a are coming fast now; the Core language working group had very little time for issue processing because of all the proposal papers coming to us from the Evolution working group.

Red Hat sent three of us to the meeting, to cover different tracks: myself (Core), Jonathan Wakely (Library), and Torvald Riegel (Parallelism/Concurrency).  Overall, I thought the meeting was very successful; we made significant progress in a lot of areas.

New C++ language features that were accepted at this meeting:

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Eclipse Che 6.6 Release Notes

[This article is cross-posted from the Eclipse Che Blog.]

Eclipse Che 6.6 Release Notes

Eclipse Che 6.6 is here! Since the release of Che 6.0, the community has added a number of new capabilities:

  • Kubernetes support: Run Che on Kubernetes and deploy it using Helm.
  • Hot server updates: Upgrade Che with zero downtime.
  • C/C++ support: ClangD Language Server was added.
  • Camel LS support: Apache Camel Language Server Protocol (LSP) support was added.
  • <strong”>Eclipse Java Development Tools (JDT) Language Server (LS): Extended LS capabilities were added for Eclipse Che.
  • Faster workspace loading: Images are pulled in parallel with the new UI.

Quick Start

Che is a cloud IDE and containerized workspace server. You can get started with Che by using the following links:

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Detecting String Truncation with GCC 8

Continuing in the effort to detect common programming errors, the just-released GCC 8 contains a number of new warnings as well as enhancements to existing checkers to help find non-obvious bugs in C and C++ code. This article focuses on those that deal with inadvertent string truncation and discusses some of the approaches for avoiding the underlying problems. If you haven’t read it, you might also want to read David Malcolm’s article Usability improvements in GCC 8.

Why Is String Truncation a Problem?

It is well-known why buffer overflow is dangerous: writing past the end of an object can overwrite data in adjacent storage, resulting in data corruption. In the most benign cases, the corruption can simply lead to incorrect behavior of the program. If the adjacent data is an address in the executable text segment, the corruption may be exploitable to gain control of the affected process, which can lead to a security vulnerability. (See CWE-119 for more on buffer overflow.)

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A Red Hat Summit sign on the streets of San Francisco

Red Hat Summit: An introduction to OpenShift.io

Red Hat OpenShift.io is an innovative online service for development teams. Installing and configuring IDEs, libraries, and various tools is a major time sink. OpenShift.io is a cloud-native set of zero-install tools for editing and debugging code, agile planning, and managing CI/CD pipelines. It also features package analytics (an unbelievably cool feature we’ll discuss more in a minute), and has various quick starts for common frameworks. Because everyone on the team uses the exact same tools, “It works on my machine” becomes a thing of the past.

Product Manager Todd Mancini started the session with a brief overview of the product. There’s so much more here than just the ability to develop code online. Today’s best practices include complex deployment pipelines. With OpenShift.io, you get a Maven repository and a Jenkins pipeline automatically. You can select from several pipeline templates. If you need an approval stage, for example, that’s built in to the product. In short, all the tools you need to create a virtuous circle of analyze, plan, and create are here, with no installation or configuration needed.

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Eclipse Che’s Plans for 2018

 

2018 has been a busy year already, and we’re not even halfway through.  Eclipse Che 6 brought team and enterprise features including multi-user and multi-tenancy as well as a large number of other great capabilities (you can read all about it in our Che 6 release post).

We followed Che 6 GA with already 4 minor releases and the community worked hard in order to add even more capabilities:

  • Helm chart for Kubernetes deployment
  • C/C++ intellisense with integration of ClangD
  • Recover capabilities for OpenShift/Kubernetes
  • And almost 150 bug fixes

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March 2018 ISO C++ Meeting Trip Report (SG1: Concurrency and Parallelism)

This year’s Winter ISO C++ Standard Committee meeting was held in March in Jacksonville, Florida. A number of larger features, for which there is substantial interest but which are also difficult to get right, were discussed:

  • Concepts, along with Concept types from the Ranges TS; see P0898 and n4685
  • Modules; see n4689
  • Coroutines; see n4723
  • Networking; see n4711
  • Executors; see p0443

Jason Merrill’s recently published trip report covers the core language topics. This report focuses on the topics of interest to the Concurrency and Parallelism Study Group (SG1).  The “big ticket” items discussed in SG1 during the week were:

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Announcing Developer Studio 11.3.0.GA, JBoss Tools 4.5.3 for Eclipse Oxygen.3a

The community editions of JBoss Tools 4.5.3 and JBoss Developer Studio 11.3 for Eclipse Oxygen.3a are here waiting for you. Check it out!

Installation

JBoss Developer Studio comes with everything pre-bundled in its installer. Simply download it from our JBoss Products page and run it like this:

java -jar jboss-devstudio-<installername>.jar

JBoss Tools or Bring-Your-Own-Eclipse (BYOE) JBoss Developer Studio require a bit more:

This release requires at least Eclipse 4.7 (Oxygen) but we recommend using the latest Eclipse 4.7.3a Oxygen JEE Bundle since then you get most of the dependencies preinstalled.

Once you have installed Eclipse, you can either find us on the Eclipse Marketplace under “JBoss Tools” or “Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio”.

For JBoss Tools, you can also use our update site directly.

http://download.jboss.org/jbosstools/oxygen/stable/updates/

What is new?

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State of Functions-as-a-Service on Kubernetes (OpenShift Commons Briefing)

If you are interested in serverless computing / Functions-as-a-Service (FaaS), and are not following the OpenShift blog, you should checkout The State of Functions-as-a-Service on Kubernetes.  This video is part of the OpenShift Commons Briefing series, which has a lot of great content for developers who interested in cloud-native applications and microservices running on OpenShift and Kubernetes.

FaaS, or serverless as some call it, is a promising compute paradigm suitable for event-driven scenarios. In this briefing, Red Hat’s Michael Hausenblas and Brian Gracely reviewed the current open source offerings for FaaS on Kubernetes (Apache Open Whisk, kubeless, OpenFaaS, etc.) and discussed the pros and cons, on an architectural level and a user experience (UX) point of view. They also covered the topic FaaS vs. containers from a developers as well as an operators perspective.

This talk builds on material gathered by the Serverless Working Group , which is part of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). CNCF serves as the vendor-neutral home for many of the fastest-growing projects on GitHub, including Kubernetes, Prometheus, and Envoy.

Video, slides, and other resources:

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March 2018 ISO C++ Meeting Trip Report (Core Language)

The March C++ ISO Standard meeting this year was back in Jacksonville, Florida.  As usual, Red Hat sent three of us to the meeting: Torvald Riegel, Thomas Rodgers, and myself.  Jonathan Wakely attended via speakerphone.  There were 121 people attending the plenary meeting at the beginning of the week.

This meeting was mostly about new features for C++20, particularly when and how to merge Technical Specifications into the draft standard.  In the core language, the ones trying to make C++20 are Concepts (already partially merged), Coroutines, and Modules.  There was a lot of discussion around all three.

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