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Dynamic IP Address Management in Open Virtual Network (OVN): Part One

Some background

For those unfamiliar, Open Virtual Network (OVN) is a subproject of OpenVswitch (OVS), a performant programmable multi-platform virtual switch. OVN provides the ability to express an overlay network as a series of virtual routers and switches. OVN also provides native methods for setting up Access Control Lists (ACLs), and it functions as an OpenFlow switch, providing services such as DHCP. The components of OVN program OVS on each of the hypervisors in the network. Many of Red Hat’s products, such as Red Hat OpenStack Platform and Red Hat Virtualization, are now using OVN. Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform will be using OVN soon.

Looking around the internet, it’s pretty easy to find high-quality tutorials on the basics of OVN. However, when it comes to more-advanced topics, it sometimes feels like the amount of information is lacking. In this tutorial, we’ll examine dynamic addressing in OVN. You will learn about IP address management (IPAM) options in OVN and how to apply them.

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Eclipse MicroProfile and Red Hat Update: Thorntail and SmallRye

During the last three months, there have been some changes regarding Eclipse MicroProfile at Red Hat. If you haven’t been following the details, this post recaps what’s changed and introduces Thorntail and SmallRye.

Bye-bye WildFly Swarm! Hello Thorntail!

You may have missed this important news. Our MicroProfile implementation changed its name two months ago.

After a lot of feedback from the community, we decided to rename “WildFly Swarm” to Thorntail. While the former name was nice, we found that the “Swarm” term was a bit overloaded in the IT industry and could be confusing. It’s the same for the “WildFly” part; sharing this name with our Java EE application server was a source of confusion for some users, making them think it was a subproject of WildFly.

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Firewalld: The Future is nftables

Firewalld, the default firewall management tool in Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Fedora, has gained long sought support for nftables. This was announced in detail on firewalld’s project blog. The feature landed in the firewalld 0.6.0 release as the new default firewall backend.

The benefits of nftables have been outlined on the Red Hat Developer Blog:

There are many longstanding issues with firewalld that we can address with nftables that were not possible with the old iptables backend. The nftables backend allows the following improvements:

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OKD: Renaming of OpenShift Origin with 3.10 release

[We are reposting on the Red Hat Developers blog this article from the Red Hat OpenShift blog, which was written by Diane Mueller-Klingspor.]

When we released OpenShift Origin as the open source upstream project for Red Hat OpenShift back in April 2012, we had little inkling of the phenomenal trajectory of cloud-native technology that was to come. With all the work that has gone into the Kubernetes-based core platform (OpenShift 3) from the initial OpenShift Origin 1.0 Release (OpenShift 3) in June 2015, to the current release of Red Hat OpenShift 3.10 release last week, we’ve seen the rise of Kubernetes and containers create the basis of the cloud-native landscape. We collaborated in the incubation and maturation of dozens of new cloud-native projects and into a myriad of upstream projects, expanding the universe of tools and platforms in a way we could only have dreamed about just three years ago.

So it’s time for a new logo, a new website, and a new name for our open source project. We are changing the name of our open source project to better represent who we are today, and who we’ll be tomorrow—the Origin community distribution of Kubernetes that powers Red Hat OpenShift.

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Collaboration in open source license enforcement — a community movement is happening

[We are reposting on the Red Hat Developers blog this article from the Red Hat blog, which was written by David Levine, assistant general counsel at Red Hat.]

“Discourage litigation. Persuade your neighbors to compromise whenever you can.”

This was Abraham Lincoln speaking in the mid-1800s but his advice is still relevant today. Litigation is almost always a poor tool for fostering collaboration, whether among neighbors or software developers.

In approaching the topic of open source license enforcement, it is important to consider Lincoln’s advice. Collaboration during open source license enforcement is a key to successful compliance just as it is an important element to success in the software development process. In assessing license enforcement tactics, you need to ask whether they will foster greater collaboration in open source software development. If the ultimate result of excessive or abusive enforcement is that developers and enterprises are turned off from participating in upstream open source communities, the ecosystems will wither and we all suffer as a result.

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Announcing the DevConf.US 2018 developer conference

I am happy to announce that DevConf.US registration is now open and the schedule is live. DevConf events are free, but online registration is required. If you are available August 17–19, 2018, we would love for you to come and participate.

Similar to DevConf.CZ, DevConf.us 2018 is the 1st annual, free, Red Hat sponsored technology conference for community project and professional contributors to Free and Open Source technologies (FOSS) at the Boston University in the historic city of Boston, USA.

You should consider attending this DevConf event if you are:

  • A developer
  • A technology architect
  • An IT consultant
  • An IT student or a teacher from an IT university/faculty
  • Or simply an IT enthusiast interested in the latest trends in open source and emerging digital technologies

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Announcing Red Hat Developer Studio 12.0.0.GA and JBoss Tools 4.6.0.Final for Eclipse Photon

Attention desktop IDE users: Red Hat Developer Studio 12.0 and the community edition, JBoss Tools 4.6.0 for Eclipse Photon, are now available. You can download a bundled installer, Developer Studio, which installs Eclipse 4.8 with all of the JBoss Tools already configured. Or, if you have an existing Eclipse 4.8 (Photon) installation, you can download the JBoss Tools package. This article highlights some of the new features in both JBoss Tools and Eclipse Photon, covering WildFly, Spring Boot, Camel, Maven, and many Java related improvements including full Java 10 support.

Developer Studio / JBoss Tools provides a desktop IDE with a broad set of tooling covering multiple programming models and frameworks. If you are doing container / cloud development, there is integrated functionality for working with Red Hat OpenShift, Kubernetes, Red Hat Container Development Kit, and Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes. For integration projects, there is tooling covering Camel and Red Hat Fuse that can be used in both local and cloud deployments.

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June 2018 ISO C++ Meeting Trip Report (Core Language)

The Summer 2018 ISO C++ standards committee meeting this year was back in Rapperswil, Switzerland. The new features for C++2a are coming fast now; the Core language working group had very little time for issue processing because of all the proposal papers coming to us from the Evolution working group.

Red Hat sent three of us to the meeting, to cover different tracks: myself (Core), Jonathan Wakely (Library), and Torvald Riegel (Parallelism/Concurrency).  Overall, I thought the meeting was very successful; we made significant progress in a lot of areas.

New C++ language features that were accepted at this meeting:

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Eclipse Che 6.6 Release Notes

[This article is cross-posted from the Eclipse Che Blog.]

Eclipse Che 6.6 Release Notes

Eclipse Che 6.6 is here! Since the release of Che 6.0, the community has added a number of new capabilities:

  • Kubernetes support: Run Che on Kubernetes and deploy it using Helm.
  • Hot server updates: Upgrade Che with zero downtime.
  • C/C++ support: ClangD Language Server was added.
  • Camel LS support: Apache Camel Language Server Protocol (LSP) support was added.
  • <strong”>Eclipse Java Development Tools (JDT) Language Server (LS): Extended LS capabilities were added for Eclipse Che.
  • Faster workspace loading: Images are pulled in parallel with the new UI.

Quick Start

Che is a cloud IDE and containerized workspace server. You can get started with Che by using the following links:

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Detecting String Truncation with GCC 8

Continuing in the effort to detect common programming errors, the just-released GCC 8 contains a number of new warnings as well as enhancements to existing checkers to help find non-obvious bugs in C and C++ code. This article focuses on those that deal with inadvertent string truncation and discusses some of the approaches for avoiding the underlying problems. If you haven’t read it, you might also want to read David Malcolm’s article Usability improvements in GCC 8.

Why Is String Truncation a Problem?

It is well-known why buffer overflow is dangerous: writing past the end of an object can overwrite data in adjacent storage, resulting in data corruption. In the most benign cases, the corruption can simply lead to incorrect behavior of the program. If the adjacent data is an address in the executable text segment, the corruption may be exploitable to gain control of the affected process, which can lead to a security vulnerability. (See CWE-119 for more on buffer overflow.)

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