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Eclipse Che 7 is Coming and It’s Really Hot (4/4)

Eclipse Che 7 is Coming and It’s Really Hot (4/4)

Eclipse Che 7 is an enterprise-grade IDE that is designed to solve many of the challenges faced by enterprise development teams. In my previous articles, I covered the main focus areas for Eclipse Che 7, the new plugin model, and kube-native developer workspaces. This article explains security and management of Eclipse Che 7 in enterprise deployment scenarios as well as release timing.

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Building Java 11 and Gradle containers for OpenShift

Building Java 11 and Gradle containers for OpenShift

How do YOU get your Java apps running in a cloud?

First you grab a cloud from the sky by, for example,  (1) Getting started with a free account on Red Hat OpenShift Online, or (2) locally on your laptop using Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK) or upstream Minishift on Windows, macOS, and Linux, or (3) using oc cluster up (only on Linux), or (4) by obtaining a login from someone running Red Hat OpenShift on a public or on-premises cloud. Then, you download the oc CLI client tool probably for Windows (and put it on your PATH). Then you select the Copy Login Command from the menu in the upper right corner under your name in the OpenShift Console’s UI, and you use, for example, the oc status command.

Great—now you just need to containerize your Java app. You could, of course, start to write your own Dockerfile, pick an appropriate container base image (and discuss Red Hat Enterprise Linux versus CentOS versus Fedora versus Ubuntu versus Debian versus Alpine with your co-workers; and, especially if you’re in an enterprise environment, figure out how to have that supported in production), figure out appropriate JVM startup parameters for a container, add monitoring, and so.

But perhaps what you really wanted to do today is…well, just get your Java app running in a cloud!

Read on to find an easier way.

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All Things Open 2018 – How To Jump Start a Career in Open Source (video)

All Things Open 2018 – How To Jump Start a Career in Open Source (video)

Last October I was in Raleigh, North Carolina speaking at All Things Open.  I gave a lightning talk on how to jump start a career in open source, in just 6 minutes.

The topic is near and dear to my heart, so as a lightning talk it was fun to promote the full session I gave earlier this Summer in one of the most amazing venues I’ve ever spoken at.

The talk includes links to the recording of that venue and the complete story I told. After the talk I posted the slides, but we’ve been waiting on the video recording of the session and it’s arrived!

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CodeReady Workspaces for OpenShift (Beta) – It works on their machines too

CodeReady Workspaces for OpenShift (Beta) – It works on their machines too

“It works on my machine.” If you write code with, for, or near anybody else, you’ve said those words at least once. Months ago I set up a library or package or environment variable or something on my machine and I haven’t thought about it since. So the code works for me, but it may take a long time to figure out what’s missing on your machine.

Code Ready Workspaces and Factories

Built on the open-source Eclipse Che project, CodeReady Workspaces solves this problem (and a couple of others that we’ll talk about in a minute) by delivering secure, sharable developer workspaces. Those workspaces include all the tools and dependencies needed to code, build, test, run, and debug your applications. The entire product runs in an OpenShift cluster (on-premises or in the cloud), so there’s nothing to install on your machine. Or mine.

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XML Language Server and the VSCode Extension

XML Language Server and the VSCode Extension

 

For my first and ongoing project as an intern at Red Hat, I’ve been working alongside Angelo Zerr and Fred Bricon to develop an implementation of the Language Server Protocol (LSP) for XML. Through the XML language server,  developer tools like VSCode and Eclipse receive XML syntax highlighting and checking, code completion, document folding, etc.  At the moment we appear to have the most feature rich XML language server implementation, including our Schema-based support which is an essential XML feature that we are most proud of. Combined, all these features make it much easier for developers to work on any type of project involving XML, from the comfort of their favorite editor or IDE.

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Announcing the Red Hat OpenShift extension for Visual Studio Code: Public Preview

Announcing the Red Hat OpenShift extension for Visual Studio Code: Public Preview

We are extremely pleased to announce that the preview release of the Red Hat OpenShift extension for Visual Studio Code is now available. You can download the OpenShift Connector extension from the marketplace or install it directly from the extension gallery in Visual Studio Code.

This article provides describes the features and benefits of the extension and provides installation details. It also provides a demo of how using the extension improves the end-to-end experience of developing and deploying Spring Boot applications to local OpenShift cluster.

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The Non-complexity of /etc/nsswitch.conf

The Non-complexity of /etc/nsswitch.conf

In most glibc-based operating systems, there’s a file /etc/nsswitch.conf that most people ignore, few people understand, but all people generally rely on. This file determines where the system finds things like host names, passwords, and protocol numbers. Does your company use LDAP? NIS? Plain files? The nsswitch file (it stands for “name services switch”) tells the system what service to use for each type of name lookup.

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