Summer 2017 GNU Toolchain Update

The GNU Toolchain is a collection of programming tools produced by the GNU Project. The tools are often packaged together due to their common use for developing software applications, operating systems, and low-level software for embedded systems.

This blog is part of a regular series covering the latest changes and improvements in the components that make up this Toolchain. Apart from the announcement of new releases, however, the features described here are at the bleeding edge of software development in the tools. This does mean that it may be a while before they make it into production releases, and they might not be fully functional yet. But anyone who is interested in experimenting with them can build their own copy of the Toolchain and then try them out.

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OpenShift 3.6 – Release Candidate (A Hands-On)

Hi, Everybody!

Today I want to introduce you to some features of OpenShift 3.6 while giving you the chance to have a hands-on experience with the Release Candidate.

First of all:

  1. It’s a Release Candidate and the features I’ll show you are marked as Tech Preview, so use them for testing purpose ONLY!
  2. We cannot use Minishift just because there is no Minishift updated yet. Anyway, I’ll show how could use its base iso-image.
  3. I don’t want to use ‘oc cluster up’ in a virtual machine just because setting up a virtual machine, to run it, would be a waste of time.

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6 Reasons why I started using containers

I’ve been using containers for nearly 3 years, initially working in the Technical Support team helping customers solve problems in their applications and giving advice about best practices to run containers. Today I work on a team where we develop containers to use in our OpenShift environment, and because of my Technical Support background, my troubleshooting skills helped me in this task. I run containers for most of my tasks and it makes my life easier. I can run any software on containers, whether for evaluation or even use in my websites. Let’s face the fact: containers are becoming more common across the companies. Google can spin up thousands of containers a day in their data centers without downtime, Netflix launches more than 1 million containers a week and many other companies, whether small or large, use containers in production to achieve a new level of scalability. Having this in mind, I’d like to list 6 main reasons why I started to use containers.

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The Dark Side: How Hackers are Manipulating Our World

To the average web developer, a hacker may seem simply like a nuisance, easily avoidable with the implementation of security standards and encryption methods. However, to many Americans nationwide, hackers are often defined as “super geniuses” which can “crack” into anything and terrorize our world. The main reason for this somewhat misguided interpretation of the hacking community is the fact that the media typically portrays these individuals as coffee-guzzling, cigarette-smoking rebels dressed in black, hiding in shadows, and wreaking havoc using techniques that are not only visually absurd but also completely inaccurate — think the new Fast and The Furious movie or the 1985 film Weird Science.

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Testing your Android App’s UI with Espresso

Android is one of the most used mobile operating systems in the market with an estimated market share of approximately 84.82%. Millions of apps loom in the Android OS, for various tasks and it’s a shame that only a small percentage of the apps have a well-developed user interface (UI), which is flexible and adaptable to various mobile sizes. For an average user, they want their apps to look good and do well. However, if you are an app developer there will be a monstrous problem for you, Android is open source and it comes in all sorts of mobile phones with all sorts of screen sizes. Android developers have taught of this problem and have introduced a new automated testing framework to test the UI of your app called Espresso.

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