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CI/CD for .NET Core container applications on Red Hat OpenShift

CI/CD for .NET Core container applications on Red Hat OpenShift

Many people have done continuous integration and continuous delivery (CI/CD) for .NET Core, but they still may wonder how to implement this process in Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform (OCP). The information is out there, but it has not been structurally documented. In this article, we’ll walk through the process.

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New developer tools in Red Hat OpenShift 4.2

New developer tools in Red Hat OpenShift 4.2

Today’s announcement of Red Hat OpenShift 4.2 represents a major release for developers working with OpenShift and Kubernetes.  There is a new application development-focused user interface, new tools, and plugins for container builds, CI/CD pipelines, and serverless architecture.

application topology view in openshift
Application topology view in developer perspective.

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Tour of the Developer Perspective in the Red Hat OpenShift 4.2 web console

Tour of the Developer Perspective in the Red Hat OpenShift 4.2 web console

Of all of the new features of the Red Hat OpenShift 4.2 release, what I’ve been looking forward to the most are the developer-focused updates to the web console. If you’ve used OpenShift 4.1, then you’re probably already familiar with the updated Administrator Perspective, which is where you can manage workloads, storage, networking, cluster settings, and more.

The addition of the new Developer Perspective aims to give developers an optimized experience with the features and workflows they’re most likely to need to be productive. Developers can focus on higher level abstractions like their application and components, and then drill down deeper to get to the OpenShift and Kubernetes resources that make up their application.

Let’s take a tour of the Developer Perspective and explore some of the key features.

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Red Hat CodeReady Containers overview for Windows and macOS

Red Hat CodeReady Containers overview for Windows and macOS

Red Hat CodeReady Containers 1.0 is now available with support for Red Hat OpenShift 4.2. CodeReady Containers is “OpenShift on your laptop,” the easiest way to get a local OpenShift environment running on your machine. You can get an overview of CodeReady Containers in the tech preview launch post. You can download CodeReady Containers from the product page.

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How to reduce Red Hat Fuse image size

How to reduce Red Hat Fuse image size

Red Hat Fuse is a leading integration platform, which is capable of solving any given problem with simple enterprise integration patterns (EIP).  Over time, Red Hat Fuse has evolved to cater to a wide range of infrastructure needs.

For more information on each of these, check out the Red Hat Fuse documentation. The Fuse on Red Hat OpenShift flavor uses a Fuse image that has runtime components packaged inside a Linux container image.  This article will discuss how to reduce the size of the Fuse image. The same principle can be used for other images.

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How to configure Red Hat OpenShift 4 to use Auth0

How to configure Red Hat OpenShift 4 to use Auth0

My colleague and I recently had to stand up a Red Hat OpenShift 4 cluster for a customer to determine how difficult it would be for them to port their application. Although they could have achieved a similar outcome with CodeReady Containers, their local development machines did not have enough resources (8GB RAM minimum, which is one problem of developing on tablets).

To reduce the overhead of adding and removing users from the project during the trial, we decided to skip over the simple HTPasswd provider and use the OAuth provider backed by Auth0. We also wanted to publish our guide to make it easier for others to adopt a similar deployment.

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Write a simple Kubernetes Operator in Java using the Fabric8 Kubernetes Client

Write a simple Kubernetes Operator in Java using the Fabric8 Kubernetes Client

Kubernetes is becoming much more than just a platform for running container workloads. Its API can be extended with application-specific Custom Resource Definitions(CRDs), and you can implement your own logic adapting your applications dynamically to changes in the cluster. In this article, we’ll be writing a simple Kubernetes Operator in Java using the Fabric8 Kubernetes Client

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Getting started with Golang Operators by using Operator SDK

Getting started with Golang Operators by using Operator SDK

The open source Operator Framework is a toolkit to manage Kubernetes-native applications. The framework and its features provide the ability to develop solutions to simplify some complexities, such as the process to install, configure, manage and package applications on Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift. It provides the ability to use a client to perform CRUD actions, that is, operations to create, read, update, and delete data on these platforms.

By using operators, it’s possible not only to provide all expected resources but also to manage them dynamically, programmatically, and at execution time. To illustrate this idea, imagine if someone accidentally changed a configuration or removed a resource by mistake; in this case, the operator could fix it without any human intervention. We’ll take a look at Operators and the Operator SDK in this article.

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Deploy Red Hat AMQ Streams and Fuse on OpenShift Container Platform 4

Deploy Red Hat AMQ Streams and Fuse on OpenShift Container Platform 4

In the following video, I demonstrate how to deploy Red Hat AMQ Streams (based on upstream Apache Kafka) on OpenShift 4.

I will also demonstrate how to use AMQ Streams in a basic way using Red Hat Fuse.  There is a Camel route exposing a REST endpoint at /goodbye, which—when hit—sends a “Goodbye World” message to the topic.  There is also a timer sending “Hello World” messages periodically to the topic.  A separate Camel route consumes from the topic and logs the messages for our visibility.

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