Cloud

Building .NET Core container images using S2I

Building .NET Core container images using S2I

Red Hat OpenShift implements .NET Core support via a source-to-image (S2I) builder. In this article, we’ll take a closer look at how you can use that builder directly. Using S2I, you can build .NET Core application images without having to write custom build scripts or Dockerfiles. This can be useful on your development machine or as part of a CI/CD pipeline.

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Writing better Spring applications using SpringFu

Writing better Spring applications using SpringFu

“Truth can only be found in one place: the code,” Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship.

The way we structure our code has a direct impact on how understandable is it. Code that is easy to follow with no or less hidden functionality is much easier to maintain. It also makes it easier for our fellow programmers to track down bugs in the code. This helps us to avoid Venkat’s Jesus Driven Development.

The way I write Spring applications comprises heavy use of Spring annotations. The problem with this approach is that partial flow of the application is controlled by annotations. The complete flow of my code is not in one place, that is, in my code. I need to look back to the documentation to understand the annotations’ behavior. By reading just the code, it is difficult to predict the flow of control.

Luckily, Spring has a new way to code to and it has been called Spring Functional or SpringFu. In this article, I will use Kotlin to showcase some of the benefits you get from SpringFu.

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Processing CloudEvents with Eclipse Vert.x

Processing CloudEvents with Eclipse Vert.x

Our connected world is full of events that are triggered or received by different software services. One of the big issues is that event publishers tend to describe events differently and in ways that are mostly incompatible with each other.

To address this, the Serverless Working Group from the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) recently announced version 0.2 of the CloudEvents specification. The specification aims to describe event data in a common, standardized way. To some degree, a CloudEvent is an abstract envelope with some specified attributes that describe a concrete event and its data.

Working with CloudEvents is simple. This article shows how to use the powerful JVM toolkit provided by Vert.x to either generate or receive and process CloudEvents.

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Red Hat KubeCon Seattle 2018 Events & Demos

Red Hat KubeCon Seattle 2018 Events & Demos

Visit Red Hat at booth D1

Stop by the Red Hat booth D1 to explore 1:1 demos and speak with our open source specialists. We’ll be giving away Red Hat beanies, stickers, Command Line Hero coloring books and more, while supplies last.

Booth Demos

Develop Anywhere: tools for cloud native development

Tue Dec 11 10:40 11:00am
Tugdual Grall

An overview of the tools developers can use to build cloud native applications.

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IP packet buffering in OVN

IP packet buffering in OVN

Open Virtual Network (OVN) is a subproject of Open vSwitch (OVS), a performant, programmable, multi-platform virtual switch. OVN adds to the OVS existing capabilities the support for overlay networks by introducing virtual network abstractions such as virtual switches and routers. Moreover, OVN provides native methods for setting up Access Control Lists (ACLs) and network services such as DHCP. Many Red Hat products, such as Red Hat OpenStack Platform and Red Hat Virtualization, are now using OVN, and Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform will be using OVN soon.

In this article, I’ll cover how OVN ARP/ND_NS actions work, the main limitations in the current implementation, and how to overcome those. First, I’ll provide a brief overview of OVN’s architecture to facilitate the discussion:

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Quickly try Red Hat Process Automation Manager in your cloud

Quickly try Red Hat Process Automation Manager in your cloud

It’s been some time since I last talked with you about putting JBoss BPM Suite (now called Red Hat Process Automation Manager) into your cloud, and with the new release, it’s time to talk AppDev in the cloud again.

It’s time to update the story and see how to put Red Hat Process Automation Manager in your cloud so you are set up with a standard configuration to start your first business rules project.

With the easy installation demo project described below, you can leverage process automation tooling through the business central web console running containerized on any Red Hat OpenShift.

Let’s take a closer look at how this works.

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Announcing the Red Hat OpenShift extension for Visual Studio Code: Public Preview

Announcing the Red Hat OpenShift extension for Visual Studio Code: Public Preview

We are extremely pleased to announce that the preview release of the Red Hat OpenShift extension for Visual Studio Code is now available. You can download the OpenShift Connector extension from the marketplace or install it directly from the extension gallery in Visual Studio Code.

This article provides describes the features and benefits of the extension and provides installation details. It also provides a demo of how using the extension improves the end-to-end experience of developing and deploying Spring Boot applications to local OpenShift cluster.

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Solving the challenges of debugging microservices on a container platform

Solving the challenges of debugging microservices on a container platform

Microservices have become mainstream in the enterprise. This proliferation of microservices applications generates new problems, which requires a new approach to managing problems. A microservice is a small, independently deployable, and independently scalable software service that is designed to encapsulate a specific semantic function in the larger applicationl. This article explores several approaches to deploying tools to debug microservices applications on a Kubernetes platform like Red Hat OpenShift, including OpenTracing,  Squash, Telepresence, and creating a Squash Operator in Red Hat Ansible Automation.

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Extending support to Spring Boot for Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes

Extending support to Spring Boot for Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes

What Red Hat is providing

Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes (RHOAR) is a recommended set of products, tools, and components for developing and maintaining cloud-native applications on the Red Hat OpenShift platform. As part of this offering, Red Hat is extending its support to Spring Boot and related frameworks for building modern, production-grade, Java-based cloud-native applications.

Spring Boot lets you create opinionated Spring-based standalone applications. The Spring Boot runtime also integrates with the OpenShift platform, allowing your services to externalize their configuration, implement health checks, provide resiliency and failover, and much more. To learn more about how Spring Boot applications integrate with the wider Red Hat portfolio, check out the following OpenShift Commons Briefing by Thomas Qvarnstrom:

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Leveraging OpenShift or Kubernetes for automated performance tests (part 1)

Leveraging OpenShift or Kubernetes for automated performance tests (part 1)

This is the first article in a series of three articles based on a session I hold at Red Hat Tech Exchange EMEA. In this first article, I present the rationale and approach for leveraging Red Hat OpenShift or Kubernetes for automated performance testing, give an overview of the setup, and discuss points that are worth considering when executing and analyzing performance tests. I will also say a few words about performance tuning.

In the second article, we will look at building an observability stack, which—beyond the support it provides in production—can be leveraged during performance tests. Open sources projects like Prometheus, Jaeger, Elasticsearch and Grafana will be used for the purpose. The third article will present the details for building an environment for performance testing and automating the execution with JMeter and Jenkins.

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