Ansible

Automated migration from JBoss AMQ 6 to Red Hat AMQ 7 on Red Hat OpenShift

Automated migration from JBoss AMQ 6 to Red Hat AMQ 7 on Red Hat OpenShift

Since Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform was first released, Red Hat Middleware products were provided to deploy on it and help developers to build more complex solutions. Messaging Brokers are a very important piece in most new application architectures, such as microservices, event sourcing, and CQRS. Red Hat JBoss AMQ was provided from the beginning to deploy Messaging Brokers on Red Hat OpenShift easily.

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Full API lifecycle management: A primer

Full API lifecycle management: A primer

APIs are the cornerstone of so many recent breakthroughs: from mobile applications, to the Internet of Things, to cloud computing. All those technologies expose, consume, and are built on APIs. And those APIs are a key driver for generating new revenue. Salesforce generates 50% of its revenue through APIs, Expedia generates 90% of its, and eBay generates 60% of its. With APIs becoming so central, it becomes essential to deal with full API lifecycle management. The success of your digital transformation project depends on it!

This article describes a set of full API lifecycle management activities that can guide you from an idea to the realization, from the inception of an API program up to management at scale throughout your whole company.

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How to install Ansible Tower on Red Hat OpenShift

How to install Ansible Tower on Red Hat OpenShift

In this article, I will show how to install and manage Red Hat Ansible Tower on Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform. Ansible Tower helps you scale IT automation, manage complex deployments, and improve productivity. You can centralize and control your IT infrastructure with a visual dashboard, and it provides role-based access control, job scheduling, integrated notifications, graphical inventory management, and more.

As you may know, Ansible Tower 3.3, the latest release of this automation platform, was released a few weeks ago and added new features. From the release notes you’ll see that Ansible Tower 3.3 added support for a container-based installation on top of OpenShift

In this blog, we’ll see how easy it is to set up Ansible Tower 3.3 on OpenShift and have it running as a container in just a few minutes.

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Customizing an OpenShift Ansible Playbook Bundle

Customizing an OpenShift Ansible Playbook Bundle

Today I want to talk about Ansible Service Broker and Ansible Playbook Bundle. These components are relatively new in the Red Hat OpenShift ecosystem, but they are now fully supported features available in the Service Catalog component of OpenShift 3.9.

Before getting deep into the technology, I want to give you some basic information (quoted below from the product documentation) about all the components and their features:

  • Ansible Service Broker is an implementation of the Open Service Broker API that manages applications defined in Ansible Playbook Bundles.
  • Ansible Playbook Bundles (APB) are a method of defining applications via a collection of Ansible Playbooks built into a container with an Ansible runtime with the playbooks corresponding to a type of request specified in the Open Service Broker API specification.
  • Playbooks are Ansible’s configuration, deployment, and orchestration language. They can describe a policy you want your remote systems to enforce, or a set of steps in a general IT process.

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Using Ansible Galaxy Roles in Ansible Playbook Bundles

Using Ansible Galaxy Roles in Ansible Playbook Bundles

[In case you aren’t following the OpenShift blog, I’m cross posting my article here because I think it will be of interest to the Red Hat Developer commnity.]

The Open Service Broker API standard aims to standardize how services (cloud, third-party, on-premise, legacy, etc) are delivered to applications running on cloud platforms like OpenShift. This allows applications to consume services the exact same way no matter on which cloud platform they are deployed. The service broker pluggable architecture enables admins to add third-party brokers to the platform in order to make third-party and cloud services available to the application developers directly from the OpenShift service catalog. As an example AWS Service Broker created jointly by Amazon and Red Hat, Azure Service Broker created by Microsoft and Helm Service Broker created by Google to allow consumption of AWS services, Azure services and Helm charts on Kubernetes and OpenShift. Furthermore, admins can create their own brokers in order to make custom services like provisioning an Oracle database on their internal Oracle RAC available to the developers through the service catalog.

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Understanding Ansible Tower Isolated Nodes

Understanding Ansible Tower Isolated Nodes

Today I want to talk of one of the great, brand new features that Ansible Tower introduced in version 3.2: Ansible Tower Isolated Nodes.

Thanks to this feature, you’ll be able to create an isolated (Ansible-Tower) node in a restricted network that will manage automation jobs for the main tower, reporting results!

To quote the release statement:

“A Tower Isolated Node is a headless Ansible Tower node that can be used for local execution capacity, either in a constrained networking environment such as a DMZ or VPC, or in a remote data center for local execution capacity. The only prerequisite is that there is SSH connectivity from the Tower Cluster to the Isolated Node. The Tower Cluster will send all jobs for the relevant inventory to the Isolated Node, run them there, and then pull the job details back into Ansible Tower for viewing and reporting.”

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