Announcing Fuse for agile integration on the cloud – FIS 2.0 release

Today, I am very pleased to announce the GA of Fuse Integration Service 2.0. This release will make integration applications more portable, flexible and allow agile developers to react faster to business needs by supporting microservice architectures. Developers will now be able to realize the benefits of microservices within integration projects and be able to leverage integration patterns while breaking up monolithic applications and reducing the size of services pushed onto older ESB technology.

With FIS 2.0, developers can now choose a more suitable technology for the composition and integration of microservices,  with a more lightweight runtime providing for faster deployment, while simplifying packaging and ensuring a smoother process from development to production, as well as allowing management of the distributed application and taking care of fault tolerance all at the same time.

The list goes on. The best thing about Fuse Integration Service 2.0 is that it can be used as a best-practice foundation for developers to focus on building business value in microservices without worrying about how they need to solve every problem on the list. And here is why…

Superior pattern-based solution for building and composing microservice  – The new FIS 2.0 comes with Apache Camel 2.18,  with 150+ built-in components and data transformation, it fits perfectly with the microservice principle of building smart endpoints. Developers can simply configure connectors to various systems and services.  

Enterprise Integration Patterns – are a new, best practice in the concept of agile integration; developers can compose microservices with ease (Simple pipeline), and simply reuse the pattern without reinventing each time.

Excellent developer experience with Fuse Tooling.   From getting started,  to real world production deployments, Fuse provides a comprehensive set of tools to help developers through the complete application life cycle. Developers can choose between traditional Java programming styles or leverage drag and drop features from tooling. Debugging and unit testing can also be done in the IDE with testing suite libraries. Maven is included for dependency and builds management.  For getting started, Fuse also provides a set of quick-start examples that simplify the learning curve but are also great for experienced developers wanting to rapidly prototype new projects.


Containerized applications – 
 FIS 2.0 offers a repeatable and declarative environment, allowing developers to quickly package an integration application into a container, simplifying the use of the same image in development, QA, and production environments.  Fuse has pre-defined a base image for the docker-like container, allowing developers to use it as a base for application logic after which it will generate images using the tooling provided. 


Support Spring Boot and Karaf runtime – 
FIS now officially supports Spring Boot,  a widely adopted environment for microservices.  Spring Boot’s “autowire” capability, and ability to create lightweight stand-alone applications has made it a natural fit as a microservice runtime. Karaf as an OSGi runtime is also supported for existing Fuse developers.

 

API Support and Service Resiliency – With REST DSL, developers can now define a REST endpoint within minutes and
automatically export the API documentation (Swagger). When connecting APIs, it is important to make sure to maintain service resiliency. Fuse Integration Service adopts Kubernetes as it’s orchestration layer for containers, which will detect any failure of the service and recover by spinning up another running instance. By supporting Hystrixs in Camel, Fuse makes sure the failure is isolated without affecting other instances. 

Complete CI/CD cycle – FIS 2.0 provides a great user experience for continuous integration with features in the IDE, Maven, source control with git and other SCM applications, and the source-to-image plugin helps developers build images either to test locally or for deploying into an actual cloud platform. The out-of-the-box pipeline support helps developers create a complete cycle for continuous delivery.

Container Orchestration – Last but not least, as the number of microservices grows, developers needed a way to manage and orchestrate all containers and services. Kubernetes in FIS 2.0 will help to automatically discover services, load balance incoming requests, handle clustering and dynamically configure services when they come alive. Operations can scale up and down services on-demand and manage resource as needed.

Of course, don’t worry if your application can not immediately jump to microservices,  Fuse can also support traditional ESB approaches. TRY IT  TODAY and get started with the agile integration experience!

 

 


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Download and learn more about Red Hat JBoss Fuse, an innovative modular, cloud-ready architecture, powerful management and automation, and world class developer productivity. It is Java™ EE 7 certified and features powerful, enterprise-grade features such as high availability clustering, distributed caching, messaging, transactions, and a full web services stack.

Testing… Testing… GCC

The next release of the GNU Compiler CollectionGCC 7, is fast approaching, so in this post, I’m going to talk about work I’ve done to make GCC more reliable

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New vscode-java 0.0.8 release

Version 0.0.8 of the Java extension for Visual Studio Code (a.k.a. vscode-java) has been unleashed onto the world. It’s available in the Visual Studio Code Marketplace and can be found and installed directly from within Code.

Highlights of this release can be seen in this screencast:

Gradle Support

vscode-java finally provides basic Gradle support for Java projects. Basically, you just need to open a folder containing a build.gradle file in its root and wait for the Java support to kick in. Code completion, Navigation, References and all the other existing features of the Java support will work as long as the Gradle project can be successfully imported.

However, please be aware that Gradle-based Android projects are not supported, because of a limitation in BuildShip, the upstream project in which this Gradle support is based on.

Update project configuration

Whenever a build configuration file is modified and saved, a project re-configuration (eg. Java compilation level update) or classpath change (dependencies or source paths) might be required, so the VS Code internal model stays in sync with the build descriptor.

So, a warning will pop up whenever a Maven pom.xml or Gradle (*.gradle) file is saved:

Choosing Never will discard the message so it won’t show up on subsequent build file changes. Clicking  Now will trigger a project update command, but the message will show up again on the next change. Selecting  Always will trigger configuration updates every time the build file is saved.

Please be aware a project update can be a long-running, CPU-intensive operation. For large projects, it might be preferable to keep the option turned off and instead call the  Update project configuration command manually (via Ctrl+Alt+U or Cmd+Alt+U on MacOS) when the editor is focused on a Maven pom.xml or a Gradle file.

Whenever you need to change the behavior, you can open the workspace settings and look for the java.configuration.updateBuildConfiguration key. It specifies how modifications on build files update the Java classpath/configuration. Supported values are:

  • disabled : never updates automatically on save, doesn’t show a warning.
  • interactive : asks about updating on every build file save.
  • automatic : updating is automatically triggered on build file save.

Mute “Incomplete classpath” warnings

Whenever a java file is opened, that does not belong to a project (what we call a standalone Java file), vscode-java is unable to compute a proper classpath. It makes it useless to report compilation errors, as the UI would be filled with distracting red errors all over the file. But vscode-java is still able to provide content-assist for base JDK classes, and report syntax errors, so the following warning is displayed:

It’s now possible to discard the message permanently, by clicking the Don’t show again option.

Should you change your mind, it’s possible to modify that choice in VS Code’s user settings: The java.errors.incompleteClasspath.severity  key specifies the severity of the message when the classpath is incomplete for a Java file. Supported values are ignore, info, warning and error.

Conclusion

This release represents an important milestone for this small project as it finally provides basic Gradle support for Java projects, by far, the most requested feature by the community along with some important usability features.

A complete changelog for this version is available there.

This Java extension is powered by two components, a front-end part, the VS Code client, and a back-end part, the headless Java Language Server, based on Eclipse JDT, The M2E project (for Maven support) and now BuildShip (for Gradle support). Both components are developed under the open source Eclipse Public License. All contributions are welcome, whether it’s code, feedback, bug reports. Please do so under any of these Github repositories:

 


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Release of v3.15 of the Red Hat Mobile Application Platform

Red Hat Mobile Application Platform (RHMAP) lets teams extend their development capabilities to mobile by developing collaboratively, centralizing control of security and using back-end integration with a range of cloud deployments.

We have just completed the deployment of the RHMAP v3.15 to all our actively updated grids.

Please pay particular attention to notes on deprecations and upcoming removals.

Full release notes including a list of known issues, customer-facing bug-fixes and changes are available on the Customer Portal here.

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Red Hat adds .NET Core 1.1 to Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform

Today, we’re pleased to announce that .NET Core 1.1 is now available and supported on Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform. This second .NET Core release shows Red Hat’s continued commitment to opening up platform choices for enterprises seeking to use .NET in Linux environments, including container-centric operating systems. We’re also pleased to lead the way in the Linux world yet again with our support for .NET, as Red Hat Enterprise Linux is the only commercial Linux distribution to feature full, enterprise-grade support for .NET Core.

New application development highlights in Microsoft’s .NET Core 1.1 are:

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Red Hat Summit, DevNation, and an Application Development call for papers

Red Hat Summit has always catered to multiple user roles and this year will be no different.  What will be different in 2017 is an expanded focus on professional application developers much like DevNation has done in recent years.  As such, we will not be hosting a separate DevNation event alongside Summit 2017. Instead, Summit will include more advanced Application Development sessions, CodeStarters, labs, birds of a feathers, a new “Developer Zone” in the expo area, and much more.
What does this mean for you?
  • Attendees:  Every attendee can now access everything that’s developer-related and at no extra cost.
  • Speakers:  You now have a larger audience to share your application development story, plus you and co-presenters get access to the entire Summit event.
Speakers:  submit your Application Development proposals today!

Continue reading “Red Hat Summit, DevNation, and an Application Development call for papers”


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More about DevNation:  DevNation 2014 was our inaugural open source, polyglot conference for application developers and maintainers. View some of the DevNation 2015 session recordings here.  DevNation 2016 will be in San Francisco, USA, the week of June 26.  Be sure to follow its status and register at www.devnation.org.

JBoss Fuse Tooling released for Eclipse Mars

We are happy to announce the release of Red Hat JBoss Fuse Tooling for Eclipse Mars. It is available now as part of the JBoss Tools Integration Stack 4.3.2 / Developer Studio Integration Stack 9.0.2.

Let me highlight the most important changes only. You can see a full list of changes in the What’s New section for the release.

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Java Language Support for Visual Studio Code has landed

Java language server is an implementation of the language server protocol for Java. If you recall, language server protocol provides a common way for editors and IDEs to integrate with language smartness providers. By design, all of the language tooling magic happens on the Java language server, and can provide same level of smartness to tools that support the protocol. In fact, we are working with communities such as Eclipse Che to make this server available for their tools.

As of Friday, September 16th, we have released our Java language support extension to Visual Studio Code marketplace. This initial release comes with a modest feature list that will make VS Code more fun to use for Java developers. Here is a list of features supported in this release. (Note, the Java language support extension makes use of the Java language server.)

  • Maven based project support
  • As you type compilation error reporting
  • Code completion
  • Javadoc hovers
  • Code outline
  • Code navigation
  • Code lens  for references
  • Highlights
  • Code formatting

You should expect to see more deployments with different tools in the near future, in the meanwhile enjoy Java support on VS Code.


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Release of v3.13 of the Red Hat Mobile Application Platform

We have just completed the deployment of the Red Hat Mobile Application Platform v3.13 to all our actively updated grids. This is mainly a bug-fix and enhancement release with no major new features.

Please pay particular attention to the extra notes below on Node.js 0.10.x, Cordova Light and CocoaPods 1.x.

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JBoss EAP 7 Domain deployments – Part 2: Domain deployments through the EAP 7.0 Management Console

In this blog series we will present several ways to deploy an application on an EAP Domain. The series consists of 5 parts. Each one will be a standalone article, but the series as a whole will present a range of useful topics for working with JBoss EAP.

  • Part 1: Setup a simple EAP 7.0 Domain.
  • Part 2: Domain deployments through the new EAP 7.0 Management Console (this article)
  • Part 3:  Introduction to DMR (Dynamic Model Representation) and domain deployments from the Common Language Interface CLI.
  • Part 4: Domain deployment from the REST Management API.
  • Part 5: Manage EAP 6 Hosts from EAP 7.0 domain

In part 1 of this series on JBoss EAP 7 Domain deployments, we set up a simple EAP 7.0 domain with three hosts:

Review the domain Configuration

The domain controller host0, and two slaves hosts running several EAP 7.0 instances.

JBoss EAP Simple Domain

In the following tutorial we are going to see how to deploy an application on JBoss EAP domain using the new EAP 7.0 Management Console.

Continue reading “JBoss EAP 7 Domain deployments – Part 2: Domain deployments through the EAP 7.0 Management Console”


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