Announcement

Red Hat Container Development Kit 3.6 now available

We are pleased to announce the availability of Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK) 3.6. CDK 3.6 is based on Minishift 1.24.0, a command-line tool to quickly provision an OpenShift and Kubernetes cluster on your local machine for developing cloud- and container-based applications. You can run CDK/Minishift on Windows, macOS, or Linux.

Today, we are also announcing the availability of Red Hat Developer Studio 12.9 and JBoss Tools 4.9 for Eclipse 2018-09. You can develop cloud/container-based applications with a familiar desktop IDE that has integrated tooling for CDK/Minishift.

Here’s a summary of the new features in CDK 3.6:

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Announcing Red Hat Developer Studio 12.9.0.GA and JBoss Tools 4.9.0.Final for Eclipse 2018-09

Attention desktop IDE users: Red Hat Developer Studio 12.9 and the community edition, JBoss Tools 4.9.0 for Eclipse 2018-09, are now available. You can download the Developer Studio bundled installer, which installs Eclipse 4.9 with all of the JBoss Tools already configured. Or, if you have an existing Eclipse 4.9 (2018-09) installation, you can download the JBoss Tools package.

This article highlights some of the new features in both JBoss Tools and Eclipse Photon, covering WildFly, Spring Boot, Camel, Maven, and many Java-related improvements—including full Java 11 support.

Developer Studio/JBoss Tools provides a desktop IDE with a broad set of tooling covering multiple programming models and frameworks. If you are doing container/cloud development, there is integrated functionality for working with Red Hat OpenShift, Kubernetes, Red Hat Container Development Kit, and Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes. For integration projects, there is tooling covering Camel and Red Hat Fuse that can be used in both local and cloud deployments.

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The future of Java and OpenJDK updates without Oracle support

Oracle recently announced that it would no longer supply free (as in beer) binary downloads for JDK releases after a six-month period, and neither would Oracle engineers write patches for OpenJDK bugs after that period. This has caused a great deal of concern among some Java users.

From my point of view, this is little more than business as usual. Several years ago, the OpenJDK 6 updates (jdk6u) project was relinquished by Oracle and I assumed leadership, and then the same happened with OpenJDK 7. Subsequently, Andrew Brygin of Azul took over the leadership of OpenJDK 6. The OpenJDK Vulnerability Group, with members from many organizations, collaborates on critical security issues. With the help of the wider OpenJDK community and my team at Red Hat, we have continued to provide updates for critical bugs and security vulnerabilities at regular intervals. I can see no reason why this process should not work in the same way for OpenJDK 8 and the next long-term support release, OpenJDK 11.

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Eclipse MicroProfile and Red Hat Update: Thorntail and SmallRye

During the last three months, there have been some changes regarding Eclipse MicroProfile at Red Hat. If you haven’t been following the details, this post recaps what’s changed and introduces Thorntail and SmallRye.

Bye-bye WildFly Swarm! Hello Thorntail!

You may have missed this important news. Our MicroProfile implementation changed its name two months ago.

After a lot of feedback from the community, we decided to rename “WildFly Swarm” to Thorntail. While the former name was nice, we found that the “Swarm” term was a bit overloaded in the IT industry and could be confusing. It’s the same for the “WildFly” part; sharing this name with our Java EE application server was a source of confusion for some users, making them think it was a subproject of WildFly.

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OKD: Renaming of OpenShift Origin with 3.10 release

[We are reposting on the Red Hat Developers blog this article from the Red Hat OpenShift blog, which was written by Diane Mueller-Klingspor.]

When we released OpenShift Origin as the open source upstream project for Red Hat OpenShift back in April 2012, we had little inkling of the phenomenal trajectory of cloud-native technology that was to come. With all the work that has gone into the Kubernetes-based core platform (OpenShift 3) from the initial OpenShift Origin 1.0 Release (OpenShift 3) in June 2015, to the current release of Red Hat OpenShift 3.10 release last week, we’ve seen the rise of Kubernetes and containers create the basis of the cloud-native landscape. We collaborated in the incubation and maturation of dozens of new cloud-native projects and into a myriad of upstream projects, expanding the universe of tools and platforms in a way we could only have dreamed about just three years ago.

So it’s time for a new logo, a new website, and a new name for our open source project. We are changing the name of our open source project to better represent who we are today, and who we’ll be tomorrow—the Origin community distribution of Kubernetes that powers Red Hat OpenShift.

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Collaboration in open source license enforcement — a community movement is happening

[We are reposting on the Red Hat Developers blog this article from the Red Hat blog, which was written by David Levine, assistant general counsel at Red Hat.]

“Discourage litigation. Persuade your neighbors to compromise whenever you can.”

This was Abraham Lincoln speaking in the mid-1800s but his advice is still relevant today. Litigation is almost always a poor tool for fostering collaboration, whether among neighbors or software developers.

In approaching the topic of open source license enforcement, it is important to consider Lincoln’s advice. Collaboration during open source license enforcement is a key to successful compliance just as it is an important element to success in the software development process. In assessing license enforcement tactics, you need to ask whether they will foster greater collaboration in open source software development. If the ultimate result of excessive or abusive enforcement is that developers and enterprises are turned off from participating in upstream open source communities, the ecosystems will wither and we all suffer as a result.

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Announcing the DevConf.US 2018 developer conference

I am happy to announce that DevConf.US registration is now open and the schedule is live. DevConf events are free, but online registration is required. If you are available August 17–19, 2018, we would love for you to come and participate.

Similar to DevConf.CZ, DevConf.us 2018 is the 1st annual, free, Red Hat sponsored technology conference for community project and professional contributors to Free and Open Source technologies (FOSS) at the Boston University in the historic city of Boston, USA.

You should consider attending this DevConf event if you are:

  • A developer
  • A technology architect
  • An IT consultant
  • An IT student or a teacher from an IT university/faculty
  • Or simply an IT enthusiast interested in the latest trends in open source and emerging digital technologies

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Red Hat OpenShift

Sabre chooses Red Hat OpenShift for cloud-native DevOps platform

As part of its strategy to re-imagine the business of travel, Sabre Corporation today announced that it will leverage Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform as the foundation for its Next Generation Platform initiative. OpenShift will be the basis of a modern architecture that includes microservices, development and operations (DevOps), and a multi-faceted cloud strategy to lead an industry evolution in the future of retailing, distribution, and fulfillment through innovative technology. OpenShift, built on containers and Kubernetes, is the the industry’s leading enterprise Kubernetes platform for running existing and cloud-native applications in any cloud.

“The Next Generation Platform is the cornerstone of Sabre’s long-term technology strategy,” said Vish Saoji, Sabre CTO. “Red Hat has delivered the enterprise-hardened software environment we need to help drive our technology transformation, and this collaboration allows us to build upon that architecture and execute our plan.”

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jboss

Announcing Red Hat Application Migration Toolkit 4.1.0: Now with technical reports

[In case you aren’t following the Red Hat JBoss Middleware blog, we are reposting this article on developers.redhat.com.]

Red Hat Application Migration Toolkit (RHAMT) 4.1.0 has been released, and with it a new feature that I’d like to highlight in this article—Technology Reports.

If you’re not familiar with RHAMT, check out my previous article that introduces RHAMT and describes how you can use it to help with migration existing applications to a modern application platform by analyzing your code base.

Technology reports

This new feature in RHAMT provides an aggregate listing of the technologies used, grouped by function, for the analyzed applications. It shows how the technologies are distributed. After analysis has been performed, using this report hundreds of applications can be quickly compared. In addition, the size, number of libraries, and story point totals of each application are displayed, allowing you to quickly determine each application’s type from a single report, for example:

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The wait is over: JBoss Web Server 5 with Tomcat 9 is here!

We are excited to announce the General Availability release of Red Hat JBoss Web Server 5.0 for Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL). Other platforms are will be released shortly. This release includes a technology preview of transactions processing through Narayana. JBoss Web Server 5 is available in the ZIP or RPM format from the JBoss Web Server 5.0 Maven repository and Container Catalog.

JBoss Web Server combines market-leading open source technologies with enterprise capabilities to provide a single solution for large-scale websites and lightweight web applications. It combines the world’s most deployed web server (Apache) with the top servlet engine (Tomcat) and the best support in middleware (from Red Hat).

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