Announcement

Red Hat Developer Toolset 8.1 Beta now available

Red Hat Developer Toolset 8.1 Beta now available

Red Hat Developer Toolset augments Red Hat Enterprise Linux with the latest, stable versions of GCC that install alongside the original base version. This version of Red Hat Developer Toolset 8.1 Beta includes the following new components:

  • GCC 8.2.1
  • GDB 8.2
  • binutils 2.30
  • elfutils 0.176
  • Valgrind 3.14.0

This Beta release is supported on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 for AMD64 and Intel 64 architectures. It also supports the following architectures on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7:  64-bit ARM, big- and little-endian variants of IBM POWER (), and IBM Z. See below for more information about each updated component.

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Red Hat Software Collections 3.3 Beta: New and updated components

Red Hat Software Collections 3.3 Beta: New and updated components

Red Hat Software Collections supply the latest, stable versions of development tools for Red Hat Enterprise Linux via two release trains per year. We are pleased to introduce three new and two updated components in this release, Red Hat Software Collections 3.3 Beta.

The new components are:

  • Ruby 2.6
  • MariaDB 10.3 featuring a new MariaDB Connector for Java
  • Redis 5.0

The updated items include:

  • Two updates to Apache httpd
  • One update to HAProxy

See below for component details.

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Eclipse Wild Web Developer adds a powerful YAML editor with built-in Kubernetes support

Eclipse Wild Web Developer adds a powerful YAML editor with built-in Kubernetes support

YAML Ain’t Markup Language (YAML) has grown increasingly popular during the past few years. It is a human-readable text-based format for specifying configuration information and is used in many platforms, such as Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift.

Eclipse Wild Web Developer is a language-based extension that provides a rich development experience for developing typical web and configuration files in the Eclipse IDE. According to the project page, “Eclipse Wild Web Developer relies on existing mainstream and maintained components to provide the language smartness, over popular configuration files like TextMate and protocols like Language Server Protocol  or Debug Adapter Protocol.”

Recently, the YAML Language Server has been integrated into Eclipse Wild Web Developer. This is a feature-rich YAML Language Server implementation that also powers editors including VSCode, Eclipse Che, and Atom. This integration brings all the features that Language Server supports, including validation, autocompletion, hover support, and document outlining to the Eclipse Generic Editor, making it much easier to write and maintain YAML files.

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Announcing Red Hat CodeReady Studio, the latest evolution of Red Hat Developer Studio

Announcing Red Hat CodeReady Studio, the latest evolution of Red Hat Developer Studio

Red Hat has been shipping a distribution of Eclipse IDE for years now, including all of the great features of Eclipse along with the add-ons, plugins, and tooling that make working with our products easy and enjoyable. These distributions have gone by different names over the years to indicate how they fit into the Red Hat ecosystem, and to tap into the trust that developers have when they think about Red Hat and what a Red Hat product means for them: it’ll be reliable; it’ll have a published lifecycle; it’s built from source; and if you submit a bug, we’ll fix it (and give the fix to the community). This change is no different.

Red Hat CodeReady Studio is the latest evolution of Red Hat Developer Studio, which itself was an evolution of JBoss Developer Studio. We’re proud to include our distribution of Eclipse IDE in the expanding CodeReady portfolio. Based on the latest Eclipse 4.11, with the latest additions of JBoss Tools and end-to-end testing that ensures everything works as expected, developers can count on the same great experience they’ve grown used to. With tools for working with Fuse and other middleware products and connectors for Red Hat OpenShift that enable super-fast, container-native “inner loop” development cycles, CodeReady Studio is absolutely one of the best desktop IDEs an enterprise JavaTM developer can use.

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What Red Hat OpenShift Connector for JetBrains products offers developers

What Red Hat OpenShift Connector for JetBrains products offers developers

We are extremely pleased to announce that the preview release of the Red Hat OpenShift Connector for JetBrains products (IntelliJ IDEA, WebStorm, etc.) is now available in Preview Mode and supports Java and Node.js components. You can download the OpenShift Connector plugin from the JetBrains marketplace or install it directly from the plugins gallery in JetBrains products.

In this article, we’ll look at features and benefits of the plugin and installation details, and show a demo of how using the plugin improves the end-to-end experience of developing and deploying Spring Boot applications to your OpenShift cluster.

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Red Hat Enterprise Linux compiler toolset updates: Clang/LLVM 7.0, Go 1.11, Rust 1.31

Red Hat Enterprise Linux compiler toolset updates: Clang/LLVM 7.0, Go 1.11, Rust 1.31

We are pleased to announce the general availability of these three compiler toolsets for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7:

  • Clang/LLVM 7.0
  • Go 1.11
  • Rust 1.31

These toolsets can be installed from the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Devtools channel. See the “Compiler toolset details” section of this article to learn about the new features.

These toolsets became officially supported Red Hat offerings as of the previous release.

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Kubernetes v1.14: What you need to know

Kubernetes v1.14: What you need to know

Kubernetes v1.14 was released today. The primary themes of the release are extensibility and supporting more workloads. It includes 31 enhancements, with a record 10 features graduating from beta to stable. Here are the highlights:

Persistent local storage

This feature, which was previously available as a beta, is now classified as stable. The primary use cases for persistent local storage are databases and distributed file systems. Obviously, local storage performs better than remote disks, whether that storage is a local SSD delivered by a cloud provider or a disk attached to a bare metal system. This has been in the works since Kubernetes v1.5, so its promotion to stable status is a significant milestone.

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Quarkus 0.12.0 released

Quarkus 0.12.0 released

Quarkus, a next-generation Kubernetes native Java framework, was announced in early March, and now Quarkus 0.12.0 has been released and is available from the Maven repository. The quickstarts, guides, and website also have been updated, and 213 issues and PRs are included in this release. That’s quite a few updates, but in particular check out the new metrics, health check, and Kafka guides. Also, this release requires GraalVM 1.0.0-RC13 for Building a Native Executable.

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Introducing Quarkus: a next-generation Kubernetes native Java framework

Introducing Quarkus: a next-generation Kubernetes native Java framework

Java was introduced to the open-source community more than 20 years ago and it still remains popular among developers. In fact, Java has never ranked lower than #2 on the TIOBE Index. Java was born in the mid-1990s and has nearly 20 years of optimizations for running highly dynamic monolithic applications that assumed sole ownership of (virtualized) host CPU and memory. However, we now live in a world dominated by the cloud, mobile, IoT, and open source, where containers, Kubernetes, microservices, reactive, Function-as-a-Service (FaaS), 12-factor, and cloud-native application development can deliver higher levels of productivity and efficiency. As an industry, we need to rethink how Java can be best utilized to address these new deployment environments and application architectures.

We’d like to introduce you to Quarkus and Supersonic Subatomic Java!

Quarkus is a Kubernetes Native Java framework tailored for GraalVM and HotSpot, crafted from best-of-breed Java libraries and standards. The goal of Quarkus is to make Java a leading platform in Kubernetes and serverless environments while offering developers a unified reactive and imperative programming model to optimally address a wider range of distributed application architectures.

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