Accelerated Development and Management

Communicating Large Objects with Web Workers in javascript

As html5 and client side solutions become more prevalent, the need for handling more and more data through javascript will increase.  One such challenge, and the focus of this article, is a strategy for handling hundreds of megabytes of data through Web Workers.

What created this need for me personally was the development of Log Reaper [1] which is a client side approach to parsing log files with no server side upload or processing. Log Reaper identifies and parses log files (of currently accepted types) in a Web Worker, then communicates the structured objects back to the browser where they are further map reduced and visualized.

Continue reading “Communicating Large Objects with Web Workers in javascript”

Share

Using RHQ (JON) to monitor Java apps

While there is not yet a RHQ plugin for Glassfish, it is already possible to monitor an instance of Glassfish (GF), using the existing JMX Server resource template. Let’s see how this unfolds…

Set up

Foreword: While not difficult, setting this up on a laptop requires running a LOT of Java processes, on top of a database. As the latter needs to be a somewhat older version of PostgreSQL (8.4), you might even end up running it on VM using virt-manager. That is to say, at the end of the day, you do need a little bit of memory and CPU power…

Here what do we need to run exactly:

Continue reading “Using RHQ (JON) to monitor Java apps”

Share

XML editing with Bash script

Photo by seeweb

Countless products uses XML files, whether it is for data persistence, serialization or mere configuration. This is even more true when it comes to the Red Hat middleware portfolio, the JBoss projects having always been keen on using this format for configuration files – on top of the ones specified by JEE such as the famous (or infamous ?) web.xml.  While the XML format has some definitive qualities, it is not the easiest format to parse, and this often causes issues when integrating product inside an RPM or designing an automated installation procedure.

As I’ve been working on such automation for most of my career, I’ve picked up a bunch of nifty tricks and also designed some useful practices that I wanted to share on this blog.

Continue reading “XML editing with Bash script”

Share

Resilient Enterprise Messaging with JBoss A-MQ & Red Hat Enterprise Linux

Background

At JUDCon 2013 in Boston, Scott Cranton and I presented a talk entitled Resilient Enterprise Messaging with Fuse & Red Hat Enterprise Linux. This technical article is the follow up work from that presentation.

JBoss A-MQ is built on ActiveMQ which is a robust messaging platform that supports STOMP, JMS, AMQP and modern principals in Message Oriented Middleware (MOM). It’s built from the ground up to be loosely coupled and asynchronous in nature. This provides ActiveMQ with native high availability capabilities. An administrator can easily configure an ActiveMQ master/slave architecture with a shared filesystem. In the future this will be augmented with Replicated LevelDB.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux is the popular, stable and scalable Linux distribution which has High Availability and Resilient Storage add-on support built on CMAN, RGManager, Corosync, and GFS2. High Availability and Resilient Storage expand upon the high availability capabilities built into ActiveMQ and provide a robust, and complete solution for enterprise deployments that require deeper clustering capabilities.

There are two main architectures commonly used to provide fault tolerance to a messaging server. The first is master/slave which is easy to configure, but as it scales, it requires 2X resources. The second is made up of active nodes and redundant nodes. The redundant nodes can take over for any one of the active nodes should they scale. The active/redundant architecture requires more software and more initial configuration, but uses N+1 or N+2 resources as it scales.

This article will explore the technical requirements and best practices for building and designing a N+1 architecture using JBoss A-MQ, Red Hat Enterprise Linux, the High Availability Add-On and the Resilient Storage Add-On.

Continue reading “Resilient Enterprise Messaging with JBoss A-MQ & Red Hat Enterprise Linux”

Share

Red Hat Extends JBoss Middleware to OpenShift

Excerpts from Red Hat announcement: Red Hat Doubles Down on Enterprise PaaS: Reveals Plans for First Full Complement of Enterprise Middleware Services within OpenShift

Red Hat recently announced JBoss xPaaS services for OpenShift which provides a rich set of enterprise application, integration and business process automation capabilities and services in an extensible open PaaS platform, and is uniquely positioned to enable accelerated development and deployment of next-generation enterprise applications and business processes in the cloud.  Per the announcement, Gartner uses the term xPaaS to describe the whole spectrum of specialized middleware services that can be offered as PaaS.  See Mark Little’s blog on xPaaS.

The initial phase of Red Hat’s PaaS strategy was marked by the introduction of OpenShift Enterprise, which combined the core enterprise technologies that power OpenShift, including Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform, into an integrated open hybrid cloud application platform, followed by the commercial availability of OpenShift Online, Red Hat’s public PaaS offering.

Continue reading “Red Hat Extends JBoss Middleware to OpenShift”

Share