Syed M Shaaf

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Red Hat Runtimes brings Vert.x and Dekorate to Spring Boot 2.2.6

Red Hat Runtimes brings Vert.x and Dekorate to Spring Boot 2.2.6

The latest update to Red Hat Runtimes features support for Spring Boot 2.2.6, along with the Dekorate project and Spring Reactive. Together, these technologies are a boost for developers building Spring-based applications on the Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform. In this article, I present the highlights of this update.

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Red Hat build of Eclipse Vert.x 3.9 brings Fluent API Query

Red Hat build of Eclipse Vert.x 3.9 brings Fluent API Query

Red Hat Runtimes provides a set of comprehensive frameworks, runtimes, and programming languages for developers, architects, and IT leaders with cloud-native application development needs. The latest update to Red Hat Runtimes has arrived with Red Hat’s build of Eclipse Vert.x version 3.9. Red Hat Runtimes provides application developers with a variety of application runtimes and lets them run on the Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform.

A fluent API is a common pattern throughout Vert.x, it lets multiple methods calls be chained together. For example:

request.response().putHeader("Content-Type", "text/plain").write("some text").end();

Chaining calls like this also allows you to write code that’s a bit less verbose.

With 3.9, you can now create prepared statements and collector queries with the inclusion of Query in the Fluent API. If you are familiar with JDBC, PreparedStatement lets you create and execute statements. Moreover, you can run multiple interactions, such as cursor or stream operations.

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Red Hat Data Grid 8.0 brings new server architecture, improved REST API, and more

Red Hat Data Grid 8.0 brings new server architecture, improved REST API, and more

Red Hat Data Grid helps applications access, process, and analyze data at in-memory speed. Red Hat Data Grid 8.0 is included in the latest update to Red Hat Runtimes, providing a distributed in-memory, NoSQL datastore. This release includes a new Operator for handling complex applications, a new server architecture that reduces memory consumption and increases security, a faster API with new features, a new CLI, and compatibility with a variety of observability tools.

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Node.js update for Red Hat Runtimes brings improved support for native modules, diagnostic reporting, and more

Node.js update for Red Hat Runtimes brings improved support for native modules, diagnostic reporting, and more

Developing applications on a Kubernetes distribution like Red Hat OpenShift—or on Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), or by using our Universal Base Images—is easier with Red Hat’s build of Node.js. The latest update of Red Hat Runtimes now includes Node.js 12.4.1, which provides a supported runtime for LTS releases. This new Red Hat build of Node.js together with the release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 provides a number of new features and enhancements compared to Node.js 10.

This article focuses on these new features and enhancements.

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How Quarkus brings imperative and reactive programming together

How Quarkus brings imperative and reactive programming together

The supersonic subatomic Java singularity has expanded!

42 releases, 8 months of community participation, and 177 amazing contributors led up to the release of Quarkus 1.0.  This release is a significant milestone with a lot of cool features behind it. You can read more in the release announcement.

Building on that awesome news, we want to delve into how Quarkus unifies both imperative and reactive programming models and its reactive core. We’ll start with a brief history and then take a deep dive into what makes up this dual-faceted reactive core and how Java developers can take advantage of it.

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Set up JDK Mission Control with Red Hat Build of OpenJDK

Set up JDK Mission Control with Red Hat Build of OpenJDK

JDK Mission Control is now the newest member of the Red Hat Software Collections (RHSCL). JDK Mission Control is a powerful profiler for HotSpot Java virtual machines (JVMs) and has an advanced set of tools that enable efficient and detailed analysis of the extensive data collected by JDK Flight Recorder. The toolchain enables developers and administrators to collect and analyze data from Java applications running locally or deployed in production environments using OpenJDK 11.

In this article, I will go through a primary example of setting up JDK Mission Control. For Linux, JDK Mission Control is part of the RHSCL and, for Windows, it is available as part of the OpenJDK zip distribution on the Red Hat Customer Portal.  For Linux, these instructions assume that Red Hat Build of OpenJDK 11 is already installed. I will show how to set up the system to install software from RHSCL, which provides the latest development technologies for Red Hat Enterprise Linux. Then, I will install the JDK Mission Control and run a simple sample application. The whole tutorial should take fewer than 10 minutes to complete.

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Creating and deploying a Java 8 runtime container image

Creating and deploying a Java 8 runtime container image

A Java runtime environment should be able to run compiled source code, whereas a development kit, for example, OpenJDK, would include all the libraries/binaries to compile and run the source code. Essentially the latter is a superset of the runtime environment. More details on OpenJDK support and lifecycle can be found here.

Red Hat ships and supports container images with OpenJDK for both Java 8 and 11. More details are here. If you are using Red Hat Middleware, the s2i images shipped are also useful to deploy, for example, on Red Hat Openshift Container Platform.

Note that Red Hat only provides OpenJDK-based Java 8 and 11 images. With that said, there will certainly be situations where developers would like to create their own Java runtime images. For example, there could be reasons such as minimizing storage to run a runtime image. On the other hand, a lot of manual work around libraries such as Jolokio or Hawkular and even security parameters would need to be set up as well. If you’d prefer not to get into those details, I would recommend using the container images for OpenJDK shipped by Red Hat.

In this article we will:

  • Build an image with Docker as well as Buildah.
  • We will run that image with Docker as well as Podman on localhost.
  • We will push our image to Quay.
  • Finally, we will run our app by importing a stream into OpenShift.

This article was written for both OpenShift 3.11 and 4.0 beta. Let’s jump right into it.

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Using Red Hat Application Migration Toolkit to see the impact of migrating to OpenJDK

Using Red Hat Application Migration Toolkit to see the impact of migrating to OpenJDK

Migrating from one software solution to another is a reality that all good software developers need to plan for. Having a plan helps to drive innovation at a continuous pace, whether you are developing software for in-house use or you are acquiring software from a vendor. In either case, never anticipating or planning for migration endangers the entire innovation value proposition. And in today’s ever-changing world of software, everyone who wants to benefit from the success of the cloud has to ensure that cloud innovation is continuous. Therefore, maintaining a stack that is changing along with technological advancements is a necessity.

In this article, we will take a look at the impact of moving to OpenJDK and the results will aid in drawing further conclusions and in planning. It’s quite common to be using a proprietary version of JDK, and this article addresses how to use Red Hat Application Migration Toolkit to analyze your codebase to understand the impact of migrating to OpenJDK.

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