Rhuan Rocha

Red Hatter, Java EE/Jakarta EE developer, speaker, author and contributor. I'm specialist on Jakarta EE and MicroProfile. In my journey, I develop, architect and analyse distributed applications using Java EE/Jakarta EE and technologies of its ecosystem. Furthermore, I present lectures about several topics about Jakarta EE and wrote the book "Java EE 8 Design Patterns and Best Practices" to Packt. Beside that, I'm contributing to to Jakarta EE, MicroProfile and JNoSQL.

Areas of Expertise

Java, Microservice, Container

Recent Posts

Jakarta EE: Creating an Enterprise JavaBeans timer

Jakarta EE: Creating an Enterprise JavaBeans timer

Enterprise JavaBeans (EJB) has many interesting and useful features, some of which I will be highlighting in this and upcoming articles. In this article, I’ll show you how to create an EJB timer programmatically and with annotation. Let’s go!

The EJB timer feature allows us to schedule tasks to be executed according a calendar configuration. It is very useful because we can execute scheduled tasks using the power of Jakarta context. When we run tasks based on a timer, we need to answer some questions about concurrency, which node the task was scheduled on (in case of an application in a cluster), what is the action if the task does not execute, and others. When we use the EJB timer we can delegate many of these concerns to Jakarta context and care more about business logic. It is interesting, isn’t it?

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Jakarta EE: What’s in store for Enterprise JavaBeans?

Jakarta EE: What’s in store for Enterprise JavaBeans?

Enterprise JavaBeans (EJB) has been very important to the Java EE ecosystem and promoted many robust solutions to enterprise problems. Besides that, in the past when integration techniques were not so advanced, EJB did great work with remote EJB, integrating many Java EE applications. However, remote EJB is not necessary anymore, and we have many techniques and tools that are better for doing that. So, does EJB still have a place in this new cloud-native world?

Before writing this post, I did an informal survey via Twitter poll to hear what the community thinks about it. In this article, I’ll share the results of the survey as well as some discussion that emerged as part of the poll. Additionally, I’ll share my opinions on the topic.

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Introduction to microservices observability with Eclipse MicroProfile

Introduction to microservices observability with Eclipse MicroProfile

Microservices provide a modern approach to development, which is compliant with the cloud environment and gives us the ability to create cloud-native applications. With microservices, we promote resilience, fault tolerance, and scale; however, a microservice approach also presents different challenges than monolithic applications because of its distributed nature.

One of these challenges involves monitoring and logging, which naturally brings us to the concept of observability. In this article, we’ll look at how Eclipse MicroProfile can help you implement observability in microservices.

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Jakarta EE 8: The new era of Java EE explained

Jakarta EE 8: The new era of Java EE explained

Java EE is a fantastic project. However, it was created in 1999, under the name of J2EE, and is 20 years old, which means it also faces challenges in keeping pace with enterprise demands.

Now, Java EE has a new home and a new brand. The project was migrated from Oracle to the Eclipse Foundation, and it is called Jakarta EE, under the Eclipse Enterprise for Java (EE4J) project. The Eclipse Foundation released Jakarta EE 8 on September 10, and in this article, we’ll look at what that means for enterprise Java.

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Why Java is so hot right now

Why Java is so hot right now

The Java platform has become one of the most widely used platforms, with a huge ecosystem in the world of technology. Java lets developers create applications for several platforms, such as Windows, Linux, embedded systems, and mobile.

Java also has received criticisms, such as: Java is fat; Java takes a lot of memory; Java is verbose. But, Java was created to solve big problems, not small problems. Of course, you can also solve small problems with Java, but you see the real benefit of Java when you have a big problem, especially when creating solutions for enterprise environments. In this article, we’ll take a closer look at the current Java ecosystem.

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