Rob Terzi

Recent Posts

A Beginner’s Guide to Kubernetes (PodCTL Podcast #38)

If you aren’t following the OpenShift Blog, you might not be aware of the PodCTL podcast. It’s a free weekly tech podcast covering containers, kubernetes, and OpenShift hosted by Red Hat’s Brian Gracely (@bgracely) and Tyler Britten (@vmtyler). I’m reposting this episode here on the Red Hat Developer Blog because I think their realization is spot on—while early adopters might be deep into Kubernetes, many are just starting and could benefit from some insights.

Original Introduction from blog.openshift.com:

The Kubernetes community now has 10 releases (2.5 yrs) of software and experience. We just finished KubeCon Copenhagen, OpenShift Commons Gathering, and Red Hat Summit and we heard lots of companies talk about their deployments and journeys. But many of them took a while (12–18) months to get to where they are today. This feels like the “early adopters” and we’re beginning to get to the “crossing the chasm” part of the market. So thought we’d discuss some of the basics, lessons learned, and other things people could use to “fast-track” what they need to be successful with Kubernetes.

The podcast will always be available on the Red Hat OpenShift blog (search: #PodCTL), as well as on RSS FeedsiTunesGoogle PlayStitcherTuneIn, and all your favorite podcast players.

Continue reading “A Beginner’s Guide to Kubernetes (PodCTL Podcast #38)”

Share
Red Hat Developer

How to install Clang/LLVM 5 and GCC 7 on RHEL

If you are developing with C/C++, Clang tools and newer versions of GCC can be quite helpful for checking your code and giving you better warnings and error messages to help avoid bugs. The newer compilers have better optimizations and code generation.

You can easily install the latest-supported Clang and GCC compilers for C, C++, Objective-C, and FORTRAN using yum on Red Hat Enterprise Linux.  These compilers are available as software collections that are typically updated twice a year. The May 2018 update included Clang/LLVM 5 and GCC 7.3, as well as Go and Rust.

If you want your default gcc to always be GCC 7, or you want clang to always be in your path, this article shows how to permanently enable a software collection by adding it to the profile (dot files) for your user account. A number of common questions about software collections are also answered.

Continue reading “How to install Clang/LLVM 5 and GCC 7 on RHEL”

Share

Watch over 100 Red Hat Summit 2018 session videos online

Over 100 breakout sessions from Red Hat Summit 2018 are now available to watch on YouTube. Even if you were at Summit, there were too many sessions to attend all of the ones you might have wanted to see. All of the recorded sessions are in one big searchable YouTube playlist. Over 100 recorded breakout sessions for 2018 is a big improvement over the 54 session videos available for Red Hat Summit 2017.

Update: Many of the presentation slide decks are now available in a searchable archive.

In the next few weeks, a number of the developer sessions will be highlighted on this blog by topic.

To get a development-oriented overview of what happened at Red Hat Summit, watch these TheCube.net interviews with:

All interviews are embedded below.

Resources:

Continue reading “Watch over 100 Red Hat Summit 2018 session videos online”

Share

Red Hat Summit 2018 Burr Sutter Demo – Multi-cloud

One of the highlights of Red Hat Summit 2018 was another live, on-stage demo given by Burr Sutter (@burrsutter) and a team of developers. The demo was particularly engaging because the audience participated using a mobile game on their phones that communicated with a multi-cloud backend developed by Burr’s team. The objective of the demo was to show off the technologies, and also show how complex development and deployment challenges can be solved with a modern approach.

Audience members were challenged to take pictures of requested objects as part of the game. Points were assigned for how well the photo represented the request. The photos were automatically uploaded to the cloud where a TensorFlow image recognition service running on OpenShift scored each photo using machine learning. (The video is available after the break.)

Continue reading “Red Hat Summit 2018 Burr Sutter Demo – Multi-cloud”

Share

Red Hat Summit: Developing .NET Core Apps on Red Hat OpenShift

At Red Hat Summit 2018, Red Hat’s John Osborne and Microsoft’s Harold Wong gave a talk: Developing .NET Core Applications on Red Hat OpenShift.

.NET Core 1.0 availability for Linux was announced two years ago, but many developers still have a number of questions about the differences between .NET Framework and .NET Core. The session started with an overview of the differences. In a nutshell, .NET Framework is the set of APIs and libraries that Windows developers have used to years, which is pretty heavily tied to Microsoft Windows and Windows GUI APIs. On the other hand, .NET Core is the cross-platform set of APIs that are available for building applications that can run on Linux, macOS, or mobile devices via Xamarin.  .Net Core 2.0 was released last August; see Don Schenck’s article.

One of the key questions is when to use one versus the other.  Here’s the summary Harold Wong presented:

Continue reading “Red Hat Summit: Developing .NET Core Apps on Red Hat OpenShift”

Share

Red Hat Summit 2018: Learn how other developers are producing cloud-native applications

Want insights into how other organizations are building cloud-native applications and microservices? At Red Hat Summit 2018, developers from a number of different companies will be sharing their stories in break-out sessions, lightning talks, and birds-of-a-feather discussions.  Learn how they solved real business problems using containers, microservices, API management, integration services, and other middleware.

Join us at Red Hat Summit 2018, to hear speakers from Bell Canada, BMW, BP, Deutsche Bank, InComm, Sabre, SIA, Swiss Railways, USAA, and many more.

Session Highlights:

Continue reading “Red Hat Summit 2018: Learn how other developers are producing cloud-native applications”

Share

State of Functions-as-a-Service on Kubernetes (OpenShift Commons Briefing)

If you are interested in serverless computing / Functions-as-a-Service (FaaS), and are not following the OpenShift blog, you should checkout The State of Functions-as-a-Service on Kubernetes.  This video is part of the OpenShift Commons Briefing series, which has a lot of great content for developers who interested in cloud-native applications and microservices running on OpenShift and Kubernetes.

FaaS, or serverless as some call it, is a promising compute paradigm suitable for event-driven scenarios. In this briefing, Red Hat’s Michael Hausenblas and Brian Gracely reviewed the current open source offerings for FaaS on Kubernetes (Apache Open Whisk, kubeless, OpenFaaS, etc.) and discussed the pros and cons, on an architectural level and a user experience (UX) point of view. They also covered the topic FaaS vs. containers from a developers as well as an operators perspective.

This talk builds on material gathered by the Serverless Working Group , which is part of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). CNCF serves as the vendor-neutral home for many of the fastest-growing projects on GitHub, including Kubernetes, Prometheus, and Envoy.

Video, slides, and other resources:

Continue reading “State of Functions-as-a-Service on Kubernetes (OpenShift Commons Briefing)”

Share

DevNation Live Tech Talk: KubeBoot – Spring Boot deployment on Kubernetes

The next online DevNation Live Tech Talk will be Thursday, February 15th, at 12 pm EST.  The topic is Spring Boot deployment on Kubernetes presented by Kamesh Sampath.  In this 30-minute live session, we will see how to build, debug, deploy, and discover Spring Boot applications on Kubernetes. The talk will include details of the tools, libraries, and platform that could be used to make your spring boot deployment smooth and easy.

Register Now, and then join the live presentation at 12 pm EST, February 15th.

Continue reading “DevNation Live Tech Talk: KubeBoot – Spring Boot deployment on Kubernetes”

Share
Red Hat OpenShift.io is an end-to-end development environment for planning, building and deploying cloud-native applications.

Achieving Deployment Excellence with Red Hat OpenShift.io

Recently, the focus on the continuous delivery of value has created a lot of interest in microservices, CI/CD, and containers. The idea is that microservices are small and well defined enough to enable rapid innovation, automated testing, and frequent deployments with minimal risk. This is made possible by adopting continuous integration and continuous delivery pipelines. CI/CD requires the ability to quickly, easily, reliably, and automatically create and tear down complete execution environments. Linux containers address this need by creating lightweight, portable, and isolated runtime environments. It becomes easy to reach the conclusion that the path to digital transform is continuous value delivery via microservices-based on containers and CI/CD.

Continue reading “Achieving Deployment Excellence with Red Hat OpenShift.io”

Share
Red Hat OpenShift.io is an end-to-end development environment for planning, building and deploying cloud-native applications.

Increasing developer confidence and reducing development risk with Red Hat OpenShift.io Analytics

Developers often ask themselves these questions:

  • Is this the right dependency to add for the feature that I need to build?
  • What open source libraries and/or packages are others using?
  • Is this a stable and secure version?
  • Does this package’s license conform to my organization’s policies?

These are important questions that developers need to answer when choosing open source software components for their project. It is nearly impossible to deliver a modern application without depending on a number of software packages. It’s hard to justify spending time on the decision process since it doesn’t seem to add any visible business value. However, each component included is a potential liability if it has bugs or security vulnerabilities.

Continue reading “Increasing developer confidence and reducing development risk with Red Hat OpenShift.io Analytics”

Share