Joel Lord

Joel Lord is passionate about web and technology in general. He likes to learn new things, but most of all, he wants to share his discoveries. He does so by travelling at various conferences all across the globe. He graduated from college in computer programming in the last millennium. Apart from a little break to get his BSc in computational astrophysics, he was always in the industry. As a developer advocate with Red Hat OpenShift, he meets with developers to help them make the web better by using best practices around Kubernetes. During his free time, he is usually found stargazing in a camping site somewhere or brewing a fresh batch of beer in his garage.

Areas of Expertise

OpenShift

Recent Posts

Containerize and deploy Strapi applications on Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift

Containerize and deploy Strapi applications on Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift

Strapi is the leading open-source headless content management system (CMS). It’s 100% JavaScript, fully customizable, and takes a developer-first approach. Strapi provides you with an interface to create and manage all the resources for your website. You can then build a front end to connect to your Strapi API with your favorite tools and frameworks. Content editors can use the friendly administration panel to manage and distribute content. Strapi is also based on a plugin system, which makes the CMS flexible and extensible.

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Making environment variables accessible in front-end containers

Making environment variables accessible in front-end containers

When building a container for a single-page application using any modern JavaScript framework (such as Angular, React, or Vue.js), you might find that the configuration settings are different depending on where the container will run. A typical case would be the base URL for your API, which will differ depending on whether you are testing the application or deploying it into production. Developers usually solve this problem using environment variables.

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Building rootless containers for JavaScript front ends

Building rootless containers for JavaScript front ends

By default, most containers are run as the root user. It is much easier to install dependencies, edit files, and run processes on restricted ports when they run as root. As is usually the case in computer science, though, simplicity comes at a cost. In this case, containers run as root are more vulnerable to malicious code and attacks. To avoid those potential security gaps, Red Hat OpenShift won’t let you run containers as a root user. This restriction adds a layer of security and isolates the containers.

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