Gianni Salinetti

Solutions Architect working at Red Hat, focused on *nix operating systems, Hybrid Clouds, Containers, Virtualization, Distributed Storage, Automation and DevOps.

Areas of Expertise

OpenShift, Containers, RHEL

Recent Posts

How to customize Fedora CoreOS for dedicated workloads with OSTree

How to customize Fedora CoreOS for dedicated workloads with OSTree

In part one of this series, I introduced Fedora CoreOS (and Red Hat CoreOS) and explained why its immutable and atomic nature is important for running containers. I then walked you through getting Fedora CoreOS, creating an Ignition file, booting Fedora CoreOS, logging in, and running a test container. In this article, I will walk you through customizing Fedora CoreOS and making use of its immutable and atomic nature.

Continue reading How to customize Fedora CoreOS for dedicated workloads with OSTree

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How to run containerized workloads securely and at scale with Fedora CoreOS

How to run containerized workloads securely and at scale with Fedora CoreOS

The history of container-optimized operating systems is short but filled by a variety of proposals with different degrees of success. Along with CoreOS Container Linux, Red Hat sponsored the Project Atomic community, which is today the umbrella that holds many projects, from Fedora/CentOS/Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host to container tools (Buildah, skopeo, and others) and Fedora SilverBlue, an immutable OS for the desktop (more on the “immutable” term in the next sections).

When Red Hat acquired the San Francisco-based company CoreOS on January 2018 new perspectives opened. Red Hat Enterprise Linux CoreOS (RHCOS) was one of the first products of this merge, becoming the base operating system in OpenShift 4. Since Red Hat is focused on open source software, always striving to create and feed upstream communities, the Fedora ecosystem was the natural environment for the RHCOS-related upstream, Fedora CoreOS. Fedora CoreOS is based on the best parts of CoreOS Container Linux and Atomic Host, merging features and tools from both.

In this first article, I introduce Fedora CoreOS and explain why it is so important to developers and DevOps professionals. Throughout the rest of this series, I will dive into the details of setting up, using, and managing Fedora CoreOS.

Continue reading “How to run containerized workloads securely and at scale with Fedora CoreOS”

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