.NET Core Magic: Develop on one OS, run on another

I recently attempted to write a blog post about Angular and .NET Core 2.0 [Note: It will be posted as soon as the .NET Core 2.0 RPMs are released], using my Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) VM as the operating system. Even though the .NET Core 2.0 bits are not available yet from Red Hat, I gave it a shot by using a daily build. When I tried to run the code, however, I got an error related to the Roslyn compiler. Sometimes, when you play with fire — i.e. a daily build — you get burned.

And that’s when the creative juices, combined with the knowledge of .NET Core’s Self-contained deployment technology (you might also see it referred to as a “Standalone app”) came to the rescue.

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PowerShell on RHEL in One Minute

While not specifically related to .NET on Linux, PowerShell on Linux is available and — let’s face it — if you’re a Windows developer you’re using PowerShell.

If you’re not using PowerShell, now is the time to start. While bash is the traditional Linux shell, PowerShell gives you the advantage of objects. In PowerShell, everything is an object, with properties you can directly access. It’s also a very powerful object-oriented scripting language, with classes and methods, much like any OOP language.

Add to that the fact that you now have one scripting language for any platform, and PowerShell may (should in my not-so-humble opinion) become your shell and scripting language of choice.

(Hint: If you aren’t using PowerShell, here is your opportunity to turn your coding skills up to 11.)

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