Versions in Versions in Versions, AKA The .NET Core Russian Doll

Version One Point What?

Ever wonder what version of .NET Core you are running?

Well, that’s simple enough to figure out; simply drop to the command line and type dotnet. You’ll see something like this:

Continue reading “Versions in Versions in Versions, AKA The .NET Core Russian Doll”


Join Red Hat Developers, a developer program for you to learn, share, and code faster – and get access to Red Hat software for your development.  The developer program and software are both free!

 

Edit, Compile and Debug .NET on Linux using VS Code

One of the best features of Visual Studio is the ability to launch and debug an application from within the IDE. This is not an uncommon feature nowadays. When running .NET on Linux, however, you can’t use Visual Studio as your IDE. What to do?

Continue reading “Edit, Compile and Debug .NET on Linux using VS Code”


Join Red Hat Developers, a developer program for you to learn, share, and code faster – and get access to Red Hat software for your development.  The developer program and software are both free!

 

Take advantage of your Red Hat Developers membership and download RHEL today at no cost.

PowerShell on RHEL in One Minute

While not specifically related to .NET on Linux, PowerShell on Linux is available and — let’s face it — if you’re a Windows developer you’re using PowerShell.

If you’re not using PowerShell, now is the time to start. While bash is the traditional Linux shell, PowerShell gives you the advantage of objects. In PowerShell, everything is an object, with properties you can directly access. It’s also a very powerful object-oriented scripting language, with classes and methods, much like any OOP language.

Add to that the fact that you now have one scripting language for any platform, and PowerShell may (should in my not-so-humble opinion) become your shell and scripting language of choice.

(Hint: If you aren’t using PowerShell, here is your opportunity to turn your coding skills up to 11.)

Continue reading “PowerShell on RHEL in One Minute”


Join Red Hat Developers, a developer program for you to learn, share, and code faster – and get access to Red Hat software for your development.  The developer program and software are both free!

 

The Evolution of a Linux Container

(Probably, a more accurate title would be “The Evolution of a Linux Container Developer”)

Since .NET now runs on Linux (as well as Windows and macOS), the whole world of Linux containers and microservices has opened up to .NET developers. With a large pool of developers, a long track record of success, and performance numbers that are impressive, .NET offers a great opportunity to expand the world of Linux containers to formerly Windows-centric developers.

While it’s tempting to rush in — and I am the first to say, “go for it” — there are some nuances which should not be missed when running .NET code inside a Linux container. It’s far too easy to push some code into an image and be done. After all, everything happens so quickly, surely all is well. Right?

Continue reading “The Evolution of a Linux Container”


Join Red Hat Developers, a developer program for you to learn, share, and code faster – and get access to Red Hat software for your development.  The developer program and software are both free!

 

Take advantage of your Red Hat Developers membership and download RHEL today at no cost.

Creating your first ASP.NET MVC web site on RHEL

Follow this blog post, and within minutes you will have an ASP.NET MVC website running on Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL). Yes, I’m talking to you, Windows .NET developer; you’re about to double your OS skillset. Let’s do this.

Continue reading “Creating your first ASP.NET MVC web site on RHEL”


Join Red Hat Developers, a developer program for you to learn, share, and code faster – and get access to Red Hat software for your development.  The developer program and software are both free!

 

Take advantage of your Red Hat Developers membership and download RHEL today at no cost.

Debugging .NET on Red Hat Enterprise Linux from Visual Studio

Being able to edit your C# (or F# for that matter) code on your Linux VM from Visual Studio in Windows is pretty great. As a Windows developer, you’re able to work in an environment you know and trust while still being able to experiment — and hopefully produce production code — in Linux, where you may not be quite up to speed. Yet. Visual Studio, that familiar, productive and helpful IDE, is at your fingertips even though your code is far away in a Linux VM.

(Okay, not that far; the VM is running on the Red Hat Container Development Kit on your Windows box, but let’s call that last sentence “poetic license” and move on.)

Editing isn’t enough; we all know that. Since code sometimes has bugs (cough), we need to debug our code. Sure, we can write to a log and check inputs and outputs against expected results, but even that’s not enough. Any kinds of tests, even automated tests (you are using TDD, right? Right?) only confirm the existence — as rare as they are in your code — of defects. Finding the cause of a defect, ahhhh … there’s the rub. If only we could run interactive debugging from within Visual Studio against our compiled C# code running in our RHEL VM.

Well guess what; We can. It’s called “offroad debugging” and it’s not difficult to set up and — this is a technical term — it’s very cool. It’s a bit of work to get set up — not difficult, just several steps — but after doing it one time it becomes very easy for future projects. And never forget; if you get stuck, you can reach me on Twitter (@DonSchenck) or email me at dschenck@redhat.com.

Continue reading “Debugging .NET on Red Hat Enterprise Linux from Visual Studio”


Join Red Hat Developers, a developer program for you to learn, share, and code faster – and get access to Red Hat software for your development.  The developer program and software are both free!

 

Take advantage of your Red Hat Developers membership and download RHEL today at no cost.

Using Visual Studio with Linux (Hint: Windows is still required)

Running .NET on Linux, using the Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK), means your Linux VM is running “headless” — you don’t have a desktop UI. You have a command line, and that’s it.

Note: If you aren’t running .NET on Linux, hop over to the Red Hat Developer’s web page and download the CDK to get started.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux’s built-in editor, VIM, which is launched by the command vi, is not a full-featured development environment. Not even close. That’s like saying a first-grader in the annual holiday play isn’t Meryl Streep; there’s a world of difference.

So what is a Windows developer to do? You’re accustomed to using Visual Studio — the worlds greatest development environment in my not-so-humble opinion — but you want to start developing code on your Linux VM.

The short answer is “Shared Volume”. Since we’re going to assume that the CDK is being used, this blog post will get down to the very specifics you need. Following these instructions, you can share a directory|folder (“directory” is the chosen vocabulary in Linux; “folder” is more frequently used in Windows) between the Linux VM and Windows, then use any editor to edit your code. Of course, you’ll choose Visual Studio, because it’s so awesome.

Continue reading “Using Visual Studio with Linux (Hint: Windows is still required)”


Join Red Hat Developers, a developer program for you to learn, share, and code faster – and get access to Red Hat software for your development.  The developer program and software are both free!

 

.NET on RHEL: I can’t wait, and neither should you

Red Hat is committed to making .NET a First Class citizen on Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL). To that end, we’re working furiously to make sure everything’s perfect before we make .NET available by simply running:

yum install rh-dotnetcore10

In the meantime, I can’t wait.

No, literally, I can’t wait — you don’t need to either. You can hop over to Microsoft’s .NET download site and get .NET for RHEL. (What? You didn’t get your zero-dollar developer copy of RHEL? I’ll wait while you download it…)

Continue reading “.NET on RHEL: I can’t wait, and neither should you”


Join Red Hat Developers, a developer program for you to learn, share, and code faster – and get access to Red Hat software for your development.  The developer program and software are both free!

 

Take advantage of your Red Hat Developers membership and download RHEL today at no cost.