Don Schenck

Recent Posts

Editing, debugging, and GitHub in Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2

Editing, debugging, and GitHub in Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2

In a previous article, I showed how to get Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2.0 (CRW) up and running with a workspace available for use. This time, we will go through the edit-debug-push (to GitHub) cycle. This walk-through will simulate a real-life development effort.

To start, you’ll need to fork a GitHub repository. The Quote Of The Day repo contains a microservice written in Go that we’ll use for this article. Don’t worry if you’ve never worked with Go. This is a simple program and we’ll only change one line of code.

After you fork the repo, make note of (or copy) your fork’s URL. We’ll be using that information in a moment.

Continue reading “Editing, debugging, and GitHub in Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2”

Share
Managing development environments with Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2

Managing development environments with Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2

The release of Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2.0 (CRW) brings changes. Based on Eclipse Che 7 and the Theia online editor, CRW 2.0 frees the developer from the confines of a specially configured PC in favor of multiple specially configured workspaces. Imagine having a separate work environment for each language, version, tools and more, all available from a browser. This article discusses some of the features of CRW.

Continue reading “Managing development environments with Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2”

Share
CodeReady Workspaces devfile, demystified

CodeReady Workspaces devfile, demystified

With the exciting advent of CodeReady Workspaces (CRW) 2.0 comes some important changes. Based on the upstream project Eclipse Che 7, CRW brings even more of the “Infrastructure as Code” idea to fruition. Workspaces mimic the environment of a PC, an operating system, programming language support, the tools needed, and an editor. The real power comes by defining a workspace using a YAML file—a text file that can be stored and versioned in a source control system such as Git. This file, called devfile.yaml, is powerful and complex. This article will attempt to demystify the devfile.

Continue reading “CodeReady Workspaces devfile, demystified”

Share
Fixing the oc and Red Hat OpenShift install “not downloaded” error on macOS

Fixing the oc and Red Hat OpenShift install “not downloaded” error on macOS

I recently decided to use my macOS machine to create a Red Hat OpenShift cluster. After downloading the openshift-install command-line tool and running it, however, I received the following error:

(Yes, I know the above error is related to the oc command, but it also threw the error and, after I fixed the openshift-install command, I was unable to “unfix” it.)

Continue reading “Fixing the oc and Red Hat OpenShift install “not downloaded” error on macOS”

Share
Using a MySQL database in your Red Hat OpenShift application

Using a MySQL database in your Red Hat OpenShift application

Creating a MySQL database in Red Hat OpenShift is useful for developers, there’s no doubt about that. But, once the database is ready, with tables and data, how do you use the data in your application? Is there some special magic when using Red Hat OpenShift? What about the fact that pod names can change? This article will walk you through the steps necessary to access a MySQL database that is running in your OpenShift cluster.

Continue reading “Using a MySQL database in your Red Hat OpenShift application”

Share
Eclipse Che 7 and the .NET developer

Eclipse Che 7 and the .NET developer

Eclipse Che 7, an open source in-the-browser development environment, allows you to define custom workspaces for your software development. Think of a workspace as you would think of a development PC: You have an operating system, programming language support, and all the tools necessary to write code. In this article, I’ll introduce the .NET developer to this new world and highlight ways you can use Eclipse Che to your advantage.

Continue reading “Eclipse Che 7 and the .NET developer”

Share
4 command-line tools for Kubernetes: Linux edition

4 command-line tools for Kubernetes: Linux edition

In a previous blog post, I detailed how to install four very useful Kubernetes tools on your macOS or Windows machine. Those tools—kubectl, stern, kubectx, and kubens—are must-haves for the advancing developer, as well as any folks in operations. What I failed to do previously, however, was include instructions for installing these tools on Linux. So… here we are.

Continue reading “4 command-line tools for Kubernetes: Linux edition”

Share
MySQL for developers in Red Hat OpenShift

MySQL for developers in Red Hat OpenShift

As a software developer, it’s often necessary to access a relational database—or any type of database, for that matter. If you’ve been held back by that situation where you need to have someone in operations provision a database for you, then this article will set you free. I’ll show you how to spin up (and wipe out) a MySQL database in seconds using Red Hat OpenShift.

Continue reading “MySQL for developers in Red Hat OpenShift”

Share
Command-line tools for Kubernetes: kubectl, stern, kubectx, kubens

Command-line tools for Kubernetes: kubectl, stern, kubectx, kubens

If you’ve ever worked with your hands, you know that you can’t do the job right without the right tools. That adage carries over quite well to software development as well. The right tools can make the difference between success or failure, regardless of the underlying technology. In the Kubernetes ecosystem, more and more tools are being introduced as folks find ways to solve a common problem. This article looks are four of those tools.

Continue reading “Command-line tools for Kubernetes: kubectl, stern, kubectx, kubens”

Share