The Perils Of The Bleeding Edge in .NET Core

Let’s face it: As developers, many of us enjoy being on the leading — or, better — the bleeding edge of technology. Whether it’s because it’s fun to learn new things, or for bragging rights at the local user group, or because we want to keep our “career sword” sharpened, the bleeding edge is guaranteed to bring excitement to our days. Sure beats maintaining VB6 code.

But with that excitement comes the reason for the term “bleeding edge”; death by a thousand cuts.

I still have the stinging from one of those tiny cuts I suffered recently.

Continue reading “The Perils Of The Bleeding Edge in .NET Core”

Share

Advanced Microservices with .NET

During Red Hat Summit, this past May I along with Scott Hunter from Microsoft took part in a session titled Microservices and OpenShift with .NET Core and .NET Standard 2.0.  I went first and talked about building microservices.

This was an overview demonstrating the evolution through running a program at a command line, a .NET Core program in RHEL. Once completed I then showed just how easy it was to take the image and put into OpenShift and scale it up and down by running it through Docker.

Continue reading “Advanced Microservices with .NET”

Share

.NET Core Magic: Develop on one OS, run on another

I recently attempted to write a blog post about Angular and .NET Core 2.0 [Note: It will be posted as soon as the .NET Core 2.0 RPMs are released], using my Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) VM as the operating system. Even though the .NET Core 2.0 bits are not available yet from Red Hat, I gave it a shot by using a daily build. When I tried to run the code, however, I got an error related to the Roslyn compiler. Sometimes, when you play with fire — i.e. a daily build — you get burned.

And that’s when the creative juices, combined with the knowledge of .NET Core’s Self-contained deployment technology (you might also see it referred to as a “Standalone app”) came to the rescue.

Continue reading “.NET Core Magic: Develop on one OS, run on another”

Share