Doug Tidwell

Red Hat Technical Titan

Doug Tidwell is a programmer and writer who creates videos, articles, sample code, container images, and other useful things for the Red Hat Developer program. He has given hundreds of presentations at dozens of conferences around the world and is the author of O'Reilly's XSLT, a copy of which makes a perfect gift for all occasions. Not that it's particularly relevant, but he enjoys hiking and craft cocktails when not at work.

You can reach Doug through the usual channels or email him at doug.tidwell@redhat.com.

https://github.com/DougTidwell
Doug Tidwell

Articles by Doug Tidwell

Creating factories in Eclipse Che

Factories in Eclipse Che are a great way to onboard new teammates. This article explains how to create a workspace that includes a code base and various tools. From there, customize the workspace and create a factory from it. Finally, see how to customize the factory so that anyone who uses it gets a complete development environment pre-loaded with code, a running Tomcat server, and a SpringBoot application. When it's all done, you'll have a factory URL that you can share with your team. Everyone who opens that URL gets the same environment, so "It works on my machine" becomes a thing of the past. 

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Pet Clinic sample application

Part 3: Deploying a Serverless Service to Knative

Now that you've built and tested your service, it's time to put everything together. In this article, you'll use resources from Kamesh Sampath's excellent Knative tutorial to install Istio and Knative on top of Kubernetes. With that infrastructure in place, it's easy to deploy your service to Knative. After taking a look at your service in the OpenShift console, you'll invoke it from the command line. Finally, we'll look at a Knative proxy that lets the Don Schenck's React front end access your service as well. 

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Serverless computing in action

Part 2: Building a Serverless Service

In this article, we take an in-depth look at the image manipulation code at the heart of the Coderland photo booth. After explaining the code, we run it and show how it creates the custom images we'll be selling at the Coderland Swag Shop. Finally, we'll look at a modern web application that lets us interact with the service directly. 

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Serverless computing in action

Part 1: Introduction to Serverless with Knative

The Knative serverless environment lets you deploy code to Kubernetes, but no resources are consumed unless your code needs to do something. With Knative, you create a service by packaging your code as a Docker image and handing it to the system. Your code only runs when it needs to, with Knative starting and stopping instances automatically. 

This article introduces you to the Compile Driver, a new attraction at the Coderland theme park. To increase revenue, management has installed a camera next to the ride. It captures images of happy guests as they plunge through the air. Your assignment is to write a service that transforms those images into souvenir photos. The resulting pictures feature the Coderland logo, a message, and a date stamp.

Over the next two articles, you'll examine how the service works and you'll learn how to deploy that service to Knative. 

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Serverless computing in action

Creating custom stacks in Eclipse Che

Eclipse Che stacks contain compilers, runtimes, tools, and other useful things for most popular programming languages. But there's a chance your project needs tooling and other utilities. Fortunately, you can build a custom stack that includes everything you need, then build a workspace on top of your new stack. This article shows you how. 

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Podman - The next generation of Linux container tools

Podman is part of the next generation of Linux container tools. Based on the Open Container Initiative, podman builds docker-compatible images without Docker - this article and video show you how. Best of all, it includes a link to a container image (built with podman, of course) that you can pull to your machine and run with Docker. 

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Introduction to podman

How to create a pull request: contributing to Open Source

So you've found a really interesting open source project and you'd really like to help out. Where to get started? Your first step towards being an active member of a community is a pull request. This article shows you how to create one and what can happen to your PR once you've created it. All the examples here are based on the Command Line Heroes game, an open source project managed by Jared Sprague and Michael Clayton. 

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Skee-ball Machine Photo